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I happen to have jstor access through my university, so I had a look. An analysis of the always-interesting symmetries of (Wheatstone's) layouts. The author is a music professor at Ohio State University.

 

If you can't access the full article and are in the U.S., my wife the librarian would want me to remind you that you can go to most any library and request it by interlibrary loan. Sorry, I don't know what to suggest if you live elsewhere, maybe someone else does.

 

Ken

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This article was reprinted in the final issue of PICA and can be found free of charge at http://www.concertina.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/PICA-10-Final.pdf , (Thanks, ICA!) Also previously discussed on c.net at http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=16526

The article in PICA Vol.10 was a reprint of Anna Gawboy's article in Journal of Music Theory: The Wheatstone Concertina and Symmetrical Arrangement of Tonal Space.

 

In PICA Vol. 8 there was another article on the subject by Anna Gawboy: The English Concertina as an Instrument of Science . ICA:

http://www.concertina.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/PICA08-2011.pdf

This article presents a survey of general historical circumstances rather than the theoretical discussion of acoustics in the other

 

There was also some comments in PICA Vol. 9 / Communications / regarding conclusions in the articles. ICA website:

http://www.concertina.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/PICA09-2012.pdf

 

One interesting aspect is why mean-tone temperament tuning seemingly was maintained with concertinas long after it was abandoned with pianos ( by Broadwood in the midst of 1840s) . Or did Wheatstones market their instruments with mean tone tuning longer than other makers? Do the ledgers tell anything about it or do other documents/catalogues? The issue is of interest firstly with english system concertinas. What is known about tuning temperaments with early Anglo-German instruments? I guess you expect at least 20 key instruments from the early years being tuned by ear with just ( pythagorean) intervals. Or?

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