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Stephen Chambers

Shire 36-Key C / G Anglo Concertina - Reworked

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Shire 36-Key C/G Anglo Concertina #8 - Reworked

 

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"Shire" concertinas were made in England in 1978-9 (and for a short time after?) by John Timpany, and there have been a number of references to them here - including an explanation of what happened to the project from John Timpany.

 

Shire Anglos were of traditional English construction, with concertina reeds and reed pans, and a 36-key button layout that is basically "Jeffries" - though the 30 "core" buttons on this C/G one (#8) are in Wheatstone fingering.

 

It had extensive work done to it in 2008 by Marcus Music in Wales (for a well-known Irish concertina player and teacher) - see the Invoice (with his name blanked out) in my last photo. This involved new 7-fold bellows, relining of the bellows frames, new pads, valves, handstraps, bushings and dampers, plus tuning.

 

I've just finished the long task of dovetailing the reedframes securely into the pan board (they were only a "friction fit" previously, which was totally inadequate to produce a decent sound/response), voicing and tuning the reeds and, though it doesn't have the volume of a Jeffries, it does now play very nicely, with an appealing "concertina" tone.

 

Complete with a new, de-luxe, Italian fitted case.

 

I'm selling this for a lady in Ireland.

Edited by Stephen Chambers

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Interesting Stephen. My 36 key C/G Shire Anglo was possibly the last in the line. I bought it brand new from John and it remains in its totally original state apart from a few new springs and replacement leather straps. The only significant difference is that mine still has its original finely woven fabric lining behind the metal end plates, which I guess probably contributes to a certain extent to its appealing tone and certainly must play a part in protecting the guts of the instrument from the ingress of dust, dirt and other extraneous matter. Its relatively soft delicate tone is, to me, one of its most attractive features.

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I have a Shire English in the resto pile - it's in a bit of state though :mellow:

Edited by SteveS

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Hello Steve. Could we see a layout chart and possibly hear a sound clip. Many thanks

Paul

 

I'll draw a layout chart as soon as I get a chance Paul, the sound clip is likely to be more of a problem because I don't know how you do that...

Edited by Stephen Chambers

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Just for curiosity, what are the reed frames made of?

Hard to tell from the pics.

 

They're aluminium Patrick, whilst some of the reed clamping nuts are brass, and the remainder aluminium.

 

I took the photo as the daylight was fading, and the greys of the leather bellows gasket and the aluminium have come out with a bluish cast to them.

Edited by Stephen Chambers

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removed - realised the question was addessed to Stephen

Edited by SteveS

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I'll be in England (mainly Brighton, London and Luton) later this week, from Thursday 12th to Monday 16th January. So let me know if you'd like to see and try the instrument...

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