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Concertina Cases


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After searching the internet for a case to go with my concertina I have fallen in live with the little hexagon shaped wooden boxes. To my disappointment I haven't found a single site that sells something similar. Are there any downsides to a hexagonal case or are they less common due to cost of production? If anyone knows where I could find a case like that I would be eternally grateful.

 

Thanks,

 

Armadi11o

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When stood on end the hexagonal cases store the concertina in the wrong orientation. The valves on one end will hang down and may assume a new resting orientation that is open rather than closed.

 

However, they do look really good. Maybe replacing the valves every few years is worth the aesthetics?

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When stood on end the hexagonal cases store the concertina in the wrong orientation. The valves on one end will hang down and may assume a new resting orientation that is open rather than closed.

 

However, they do look really good. Maybe replacing the valves every few years is worth the aesthetics?

I suppose you could store a hex case on its side and hope it doesn't roll, but you'd still have the issue of getting the instrument safely in and out, which I understand from c.net discussions can be awkward.

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After searching the internet for a case to go with my concertina I have fallen in live with the little hexagon shaped wooden boxes. To my disappointment I haven't found a single site that sells something similar. Are there any downsides to a hexagonal case or are they less common due to cost of production? If anyone knows where I could find a case like that I would be eternally grateful.

 

My best answer could depend on what make and type of concertina you have Armadi11o, because dimensions can vary greatly.

 

If it's an older instrument, it may not be too hard to find an old case that's an exact fit for that model.

 

Otherwise, hexagonal wooden cases have been hand made in Ireland, designed to open lengthways and sit on their sides (instead of being "top-loading" and sitting on their ends like the old ones). I have one here and I'll take a picture of it in the daylight tomorrow, so you can see what I mean.

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When stood on end the hexagonal cases store the concertina in the wrong orientation. The valves on one end will hang down and may assume a new resting orientation that is open rather than closed.

 

It is true that, when the concertina is kept in a "top-loading" case, the downward-facing valves will tend to curl in that direction over time - but that's just as true with most gig bags that are on the market today, not just antique hexagonal cases. :unsure:

 

 

However, they do look really good. Maybe replacing the valves every few years is worth the aesthetics?

 

Maybe, but a much simpler and cheaper option is to store the instument with the case on its side... ;)

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When stood on end the hexagonal cases store the concertina in the wrong orientation. The valves on one end will hang down and may assume a new resting orientation that is open rather than closed.

 

However, they do look really good. Maybe replacing the valves every few years is worth the aesthetics?

 

I hadn't thought of that, function does outweigh fashion for me. As awesome as it would look I'd rather not harm the instrument. I'll either go with a gig bag or regular case. Maybe sometime down the road I could try making a hexagonal one myself to show of for when I want to feel fancy.

 

Thanks

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Custy's used to sell hexagonal concertina cases. Fiddler Joe Ryan used to make the original incarnation of those, for a while at least. They did keep the concertina on its side but the carrying handle and locks were perhaps not the greatest looking ones, if efficient to use. Not sure anybody still does them. You could use the design as a template I suppose if you're going to attempt one yourself.

 

[edit] I overlooked Steve's comment even though I expected him to mention these. I ditto having one here and the need for daylight to take a pic (which I won't if Steve does).

Edited by Peter Laban
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The problem with a hex case has nothing to do with buttons being depressed, as the palm rest (on an Anglo or Duet) protrudes beyond the level of the buttons, so the concertina would be resting on that, and the strap, assuming the end of the case was flat. On an English, the thumb-strap and pinky rest would serve the same function. The real concern is when the concertina is stored on end, the valves potentially hang down on the lower side of each reed pan, and they could get set in that position, which would make them ineffective.

 

The EASY and CHEAP solution (which I use myself) is to always store the case on its side, so the instrument is only on end while I am actually carrying it to and fro, so at most a few minutes at a time.

 

Of course, if you are considering having a case made, it is worth noting that a close fitting hex case where the concertina slides in end-on is a bit more awkward. It isn't really hard to get the instrument in and out, but it just takes a little more effort, which discourages using the case when setting the instrument down for a moment to take a break. I have another instrument which has a square case, and I do appreciate that I can pick it up and set it down directly from playing position. The only really issue is the square box is bigger of course. If I was having a new case made, I would consider a hex case that opened along the side, like a clam-shell, so it would be best of both.

Edited by Tradewinds Ted
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Six of my concertinas come with the 'original' hexagonal wooden cases, and like several

folks have already said, I store 'em on their side (I have a 25 cm wide bookcase, the shelves

of which are the perfect size for a hex 'tina box on its side - looks good and impresses the

hell out of the visitors...).

 

Reading this thread, it has just occurred to me that depending which 'face' of the hex box is

at the bottom, the 'tina can still be stored with the valve fixing points being at the bottom,

thus allowing the valve to sag away from the reed pan - the same problem as when stored

vertically? Or am I being just too pernickety?

 

Roger

 

 

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