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56 Button. English Wheatstone. At Auction 13Th Aug. Atlanta, Ga.


Anglogeezertoo
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At auction, 13th August by Peachtree and Bennett, Atlanta, GA.

Lot 13.
Description: Anglo C. Wheatstone and Co. concertina having tortoiseshell veneer. Including original box and leather case by C. Wheatstone & Co. Serial # 35725, 56 key, London, England. 7 inches height, 7 inches width, 6 inches depth. 7"H x 7"W x 6"D Wear from age and use
Estimate $3,000 – $6,000
ledgers indicate made in 1951.
Use of the term ANGLO in the description is puzzling!!
regards
Jake
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At auction, 13th August by Peachtree and Bennett, Atlanta, GA.

Lot 13.
Description: Anglo C. Wheatstone and Co. concertina having tortoiseshell veneer. Including original box and leather case by C. Wheatstone & Co. Serial # 35725, 56 key, London, England. 7 inches height, 7 inches width, 6 inches depth. 7"H x 7"W x 6"D Wear from age and use
Estimate $3,000 – $6,000
ledgers indicate made in 1951.
Use of the term ANGLO in the description is puzzling!!
regards
Jake

 

And the photo of an appraisal is for a C. Jeffries?

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Am I right in thinking that the buyer of the Wheatstone will need to consider possible problems taking the concertina out of the country and then re-entering because of the tortoiseshell veneer? I recall some serious complications that other musicians have run into from the Fish & Widlife agents' enforcement of recent legislation about importing certain materials, e.g., ivory, totoisehell, rare woods, and the like.

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Am I right in thinking that the buyer of the Wheatstone will need to consider possible problems taking the concertina out of the country and then re-entering because of the tortoiseshell veneer? I recall some serious complications that other musicians have run into from the Fish & Widlife agents' enforcement of recent legislation about importing certain materials, e.g., ivory, totoisehell, rare woods, and the like.

 

I believe it's been established that most, if not all, "tortoise shell" concertinas are actually veneered in imitation "tortoise shell". Among other evidence, I believe Stephen Chambers has noted that such instruments didn't start appearing in the Wheatstone ledgers until after the first appearance (invention?) of imitation "tortoise shell".

 

Nevertheless, it would be important to get an expert appraisal to document that it's not "real".

 

One further comment: Artificial or not, I really like the tone quality of the various "tortoise shell" concertinas I've tried, and I think it's especially suited to baroque music.

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The damage shown to the left hand end, around the bottom three edges, would perhaps support what Jim says, above. It looks like it might be the result of the breaking down of an imitation toroiseshell (early plastic type) material.

 

There also looks to be gap in the end frames, at this end of the concertina, perhaps from an impact/drop. My recollections of antique toroiseshell when used as a veneer, is that it can crack, and occasionally scale, but not break down to a semigranular form.

Edited by Myrtle's cook
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