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SteveS

Restored Wheatstone Bass

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Here is a Wheatstone 29 key bass I've almost finished restoring.

All that's left now is fine tuning.

 

I've made new ends for this 'tina - the original ends were smashed.

 

This 'tina has large resonance chambers giving it a very rich bass sound.

Single action.

Low F in G# position of right hand.

 

Serial number is 24699 - so made in 1909.

post-1950-0-31250700-1450824662_thumb.jpg

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Looks like you have done a beautifull job of restoration Steve!

Congratulations.... and are you looking for work ?

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@Geoff - thanks - I've no plans to take on any work right now

 

@Mike - playing bass is new to me and I'm working on a few ideas - I'll try and post something soon

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Here is a Wheatstone 29 key bass I've almost finished restoring.

 

Interesting to me is that it's a Wheatstone. In my (limited) experience, Wheatstone basses go down to cello C. The ones I've seen that descend to the G below (i.e., 2 octaves below the low G of a treble) have all been Lachenals. Also, the old Wheatstone price lists don't include an entry for such a "G-bass" (as some call it; calling the others "C-bass"), though they do indicate the possibility of a "contra bass" an octave lower than the "bass". (My own G-bass is a 35-button double-action Lachenal. My C-bass is a 56-button double action Aeola. And 40 years ago I got to handle a 48-button double action Edeophone, which I think I remember was a G-bass.)

 

So I'm curious, and I hope those of you with more experience can tell me: How common were/are G-basses in comparison to C-basses, and is there any significant difference in the ratios between Lachenal and Wheatstone?

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FWIW this bass used to play in the Oldham Concertina Band - lead by Joseph Astley.

Edited by SteveS

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7 hours ago, Bassconcertina.net said:

How did you get a hold of that bass, because i'm in the market for one and i don't intend to break the bank.

 

Those could be two contradictory goals.  How strong is your bank?  In general, basses are quite rare and don't come cheap.

 

I could tell you where I got both of mine, but that wouldn't help at all.  I got them respectively 39 and 30 years ago, and they were both single items from individuals, not from dealers.  (And neither is for sale.)

 

For what it's worth, right now Chris Algar has what appears to be an exceptional bass for sale:  57 buttons, double action... listed with a price of £4000.  But I'd be surprised if you didn't already know that.

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On 12/24/2015 at 11:20 AM, JimLucas said:

 

Interesting to me is that it's a Wheatstone. In my (limited) experience, Wheatstone basses go down to cello C. The ones I've seen that descend to the G below (i.e., 2 octaves below the low G of a treble) have all been Lachenals. Also, the old Wheatstone price lists don't include an entry for such a "G-bass" (as some call it; calling the others "C-bass"), though they do indicate the possibility of a "contra bass" an octave lower than the "bass". (My own G-bass is a 35-button double-action Lachenal. My C-bass is a 56-button double action Aeola. And 40 years ago I got to handle a 48-button double action Edeophone, which I think I remember was a G-bass.)

 

So I'm curious, and I hope those of you with more experience can tell me: How common were/are G-basses in comparison to C-basses, and is there any significant difference in the ratios between Lachenal and Wheatstone?

 

I have worked on several full bass , (G Bass) Wheatstone concertinas over the years, all single action. Amongst the concertina band fraternity in the UK these instruments are quite common, although my own G Bass is a Lachenal.  As an aside; I believe that there were a series of very big Wheatstone G Basses, of which only a couple survive. I did work on one of these. It lived in a large box which had a cushion on top like a bit of furniture. 

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