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Puppchen, Du Bist Mein Augenstern


Sebastian
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Hello,

 

I don't know many other concertina players, and those I do know play different kinds of music on the concertina than I do. So I can't realy compare my playing. Therefore I decided to make a recording, put it onto Youtube and invite you to comment on it. :unsure: Maybe you could refer me to players who play in a similar style?

 

https://youtu.be/Mylmiqjrknw

 

(

is an original recording from 1913.)
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Wow. It's all there. Imaginative arrangement, secure rhythm, confident playing. I'm not an anglo player, so that's as far as I can take it.

 

If Jody Kruskal doesn't respond directly, you should PM him. This is just his kind of stuff, and he offers lessons by Skype. He might have some valuable suggestions.

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Hello,

 

I don't know many other concertina players, and those I do know play different kinds of music on the concertina than I do. So I can't realy compare my playing. Therefore I decided to make a recording, put it onto Youtube and invite you to comment on it. :unsure: Maybe you could refer me to players who play in a similar style?

 

https://youtu.be/Mylmiqjrknw

 

(

is an original recording from 1913.)

 

 

Really nice! And more proof that you can get some fine music out of a 20 button Anglo.

Edited by Jim Besser
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Hello,

 

I don't know many other concertina players, and those I do know play different kinds of music on the concertina than I do. So I can't realy compare my playing. Therefore I decided to make a recording, put it onto Youtube and invite you to comment on it. :unsure: Maybe you could refer me to players who play in a similar style?

 

https://youtu.be/Mylmiqjrknw

 

(

is an original recording from 1913.)

 

 

Wow, I just worked this out on a 30 button C/G. Keeping the basses going on the left hand, with some of the melody also falling to the left side, is really tricky, making your effort all the more impressive.

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I just worked this out on a 30 button C/G. Keeping the basses going on the left hand, with some of the melody also falling to the left side, is really tricky

One thing I don't understand about the 30 button layout is that the lowest button of the G-row doesn't play the fundamental of the G chord on the push nor the fundamental of the D chord on the pull. It kind of works, because it still plays a note from the chord, but not the fundamental.

 

When I play this song, the melody stays on the right-hand side.

 

To play the melody on a 20 button concertina I had to modify the melody quite heavily. For example, I had to transpose the B section up a fifth. (Therefore I provided a link to the original version, too.) I came up with this version:

 

puppchen_6001.gif?w=604

 

(Everything after the sign is to be played one octave higher, but I don't know how to notate 8va in ABC.)

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hello,

 

I don't know many other concertina players, and those I do know play different kinds of music on the concertina than I do. So I can't realy compare my playing. Therefore I decided to make a recording, put it onto Youtube and invite you to comment on it. :unsure: Maybe you could refer me to players who play in a similar style?

 

https://youtu.be/Mylmiqjrknw

 

(

is an original recording from 1913.)

I, too, am an anglo player (30 buttons) who plays in different modes and traditions not normally associated with the instrument and I love this unique style you've carved out for yourself (I went ahead and listened to all your concertina uploads; they're all marvelous). Your style reminds me of much of the concertina playing I've encountered in maritime, or nautical settings. The Smithsonian Folkways label, for one, has released a decent number of such anthologies to furnish you with some terrific examples.

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One thing I don't understand about the 30 button layout is that the lowest button of the G-row doesn't play the fundamental of the G chord on the push nor the fundamental of the D chord on the pull. It kind of works, because it still plays a note from the chord, but not the fundamental.

That's a nifty arrangement, and some lovely playing!

 

The lack of the low fundamental on the last button of the left-hand G row came up in a different thread here the other day. My sense of the arrangement is that, while you already have a very accessible push-low-G nearby (fourth button on the C row), the push-B is a useful note (especially for bass runs) that you don't have elsewhere. So you're not sacrificing anything (other than perfect consistency), and you're gaining some fingering possibilities you wouldn't have otherwise.

 

As for the pull-note on that button, many if not most Anglos do have a (redundant) D there, though one of my two instruments has a low A instead. I much prefer the A. It allows me to vamp a D chord on the draw with an alternating 1/5 bass. Again, it's less logical, but (to me, anyway) more useful.

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

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