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Gm On Cg Anglo Possibilities ?


Sandy2v
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Just wondered if this is viable? I know 30 button cg Anglo is almost chromatic but is this key a no no? Hoping someone will save me hours to work it out as I'm a bit slow. Thank you. Sandy :)

P.s. Any links to Gm patterns/scale on CG would be greatly received.

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Just wondered if this is viable? I know 30 button cg Anglo is almost chromatic but is this key a no no? Hoping someone will save me hours to work it out as I'm a bit slow. Thank you. Sandy :)

P.s. Any links to Gm patterns/scale on CG would be greatly received.

 

I'm far from being a top gun on the anglo, but I can say that Gm is definitely possible, and not just for melody-only playing. You'll need to use the 3rd row for the Eb's and Bb's, but don't stop there. Using the pull G's lets you get full Gm and Eb chords or arpeggios on the pull. For D's and A's you might want to use the pull note at some times and the push note at other times, either for comfortable fingering or to even up the use of the bellows. Similarly, you could sometimes use the push G, though for the above-mentioned reason, it makes sense to use the pull G as the default.

 

Note: From the D just above middle C to the G two and a half octaves higher, it's theoretically possible to do a complete Gm scale with every note on the pull. Of course, you'll quickly run out of air if you try to play only on the pull. B)

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Gm is a lovely key on a 30-key C/G Anglo. This chart is worth bookmarking, if you don't already know it:

 

http://www.concertina.info/tina.faq/images/finger3.htm

 

One way to approach this key would be to start from the G major scale (entirely playable on the G row) and think about which notes you need to change to make it minor. If you're practicing the natural minor scale, that means substituting a Bb (on the accidental row) for B, an Eb (on the accidental row) for E, and an F (on the C row) for F#.

 

The pattern this gives you almost certainly won't be the optimal one (there will be better alternative fingerings that involve crossing rows), but it's a reasonable starting point.

 

Note that all these altered notes can be played only on the draw. Playing in Gm requires some forethought about grabbing air when you can, on the push notes. This is particularly true if you're playing chords. The six most essential chords in Gm (Gm, Cm and Dm, along with their relative majors Bb, Eb and F) all contain notes which can be played only on the draw.

 

So even though you can form all these chords on a 30-button box, in practice it's pretty difficult to play a full chordal accompaniment smoothly in Gm. Instead, you need to rely some of the time on partial chords that dispense with the draw-only notes. This isn't bad stylistic advice, by the way: in many contexts partial chords sound better anyway, particularly if you're singing.

 

The best way to wrap your head around Gm, I think, would be to learn two or three tunes in that key very thoroughly. Try the jig "Crabs in the Skillet":

 

https://thesession.org/tunes/1082

 

...or the reel "Eileen Curran":

 

https://thesession.org/tunes/132

 

(The latter is also sometimes notated as G Dorian.)

 

Hope this helps!

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

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Yes, totally viable. You just have to suck it up and learn weird fingering layout patterns for a key you haven't learned yet, that is somewhat inconvenient due to no two-directional "F" on 30b c/g Anglo and no two-directional "b-flat" on 30b c/g Anglo (Jeffries layout anyway). But it's completely doable, just use your two-way "Gs" and two-way "Ds" a lot to make up for the lack of bellows control you have without bidirectional b-flats and fs. Or, that is what I do, anyway. Or did. I am currently in thrall to the siren call of playing in all kinds of keys on my TAM-accordion-reeded Morse Geordie Tenor EC. G minor is beautiful on this box and you can play everything in any direction you want. On Anglo it is a Rubik's Cube, but fun once you get past the counter-intuitive stage. I sometimes enjoy doing "The Galway Hornpipe" in gm followed by 2 gm reels, "Farewell to Miltown" and whatever the one is that Bobby Casey put after it in a gorgeous duet track with his son on mando. Can't remember the title.

 

For some reason my "Copy" function will not work on the machine I'm at this sec to transfer a link between sites, but on youtube, keyword "Edel Fox at Eigse Mrs Crotty 2008" to get EF's classy rendition of "Farewell to Miltown," posted by cnet's own Henrik Muller. Ehhhrrrrmmmm . . . I THOUGHT it was a c/g . . . :rolleyes:

 

Currently, the entirety of Jacqueline McCarthy's wonderful solo concertina recording, "The Hidden Note," is on the 'tube. So, keyword in "Jacqueline McCarthy Hidden Note Farewell to Miltown," for a swellegant gm set, "Old Torn Petticoat," and "Farewell to Miltown."

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Gm is a lovely key on a 30-key C/G Anglo.

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

 

Gm is a lovely key, full stop (period you'd say in US).

 

I'm impressed with your post in this topic Bob, well thought through. With the resources you've offered and the advice given I thing Sandy should have a good leg up on playing Gm on anglo. I hope so anyway Sandy. There's not many issues with Gm on EC thankfully.

 

Cheers Steve.

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Gm is a lovely key on a 30-key C/G Anglo. This chart is worth bookmarking, if you don't already know it:

 

So even though you can form all these chords on a 30-button box, in practice it's pretty difficult to play a full chordal accompaniment smoothly in Gm. Instead, you need to rely some of the time on partial chords that dispense with the draw-only notes. This isn't bad stylistic advice, by the way: in many contexts partial chords sound better anyway, particularly if you're singing.

 

The best way to wrap your head around Gm, I think, would be to learn two or three tunes in that key very thoroughly. Try the jig "Crabs in the Skillet":

 

 

Bob hit the nail on the head. Gm is doable on a 30 button C/G Anglo, but there are limitations, especially in chording. And the fingering can be torturous. Some tunes require a bit of brain rewiring.

 

That said, it's a great key, and some tunes just sound perfect in Gm. A lot of musicians play John Kirkpatrick's Jump at the Sun in Em because it's easier, but it really does sound better - to my ear, at least - in the original Gm. It's worth the effort.

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