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Music Advice For Newbie None Reader Please


VIN
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I've noticed that some notes duplicate on the C and G rows i.e. the note is shown in exactly the same position on the staff just in c or g, forgive me if this is a stupid question as I am an absolute novice but does that mean that I can use either

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I've noticed that some notes duplicate on the C and G rows i.e. the note is shown in exactly the same position on the staff just in c or g, forgive me if this is a stupid question as I am an absolute novice but does that mean that I can use either

Yes, you can - just choose the easier accesible or better sounding...

 

Best wishes - Wolf

Edited by blue eyed sailor
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But notice that often the same note will be push on one row and pull on the other row. This is really useful when playing chords on Left side and Tune on right. Useful to really study which notes are duplicated and which not so that you can reach for alternative notes instinctively. Remember, F and F# always pull notes.

 

BTW, convention is that note names always typed as capital letters, unless you are depicting which octave a note sits in when upper and lower case letters are used.

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In addition to choosing which button to use based on wanting a push or pull, you might also choose which button to use based on which finger is free, or which finger you will need to be free for the following note. That is particularly true of the G which shows up in more than one place, but is usually only on the push for a 20 button (except for one low G in the C row), or A which is only on the pull.

 

(If you have a 30 button then you get to have G's and A's in the other direction, so even more options.)

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Vin,

As mentioned, some notes have alternates, some don't, and some alternates are in the same direction and others are in opposite directions. Not as confusing as it sounds, but it will take some getting used to (but you'll be glad you did).

 

You'll learn quickest if you try not to think in terms of rows - you're free to move about the instrument and find whatever notes you need.

 

Gary

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You'll learn quickest if you try not to think in terms of rows - you're free to move about the instrument and find whatever notes you need.

 

Agreed. I play mainly English, but some anglo (and some other instruments). My philosophy on all instruments, but especially on the anglo is, "The notes are where you find them."

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On the Anglo, there are reasons why the buttons are arranged so "illogically". In fact, it's quite logical, in its own quirky way.

 

It's one of those things where reading about it won't help much, but trying it for a few years suddenly makes it all seem obvious.

 

Many players learn the simple "along the row" style (like two parallel mouth organs) and some of them then struggle to learn to cross the rows. I did the opposite and set off with the intention of playing across the rows - and am only now learning how along the row is sometimes better.

 

You won't learn by having it explained, but you will learn by trying the options and having someone show you little "tricks of the trade" in the context of tunes you are working on.

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