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Theme Of The Month For June, 2015: Waltzes


Jim Besser
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Hmmm. I should have listened before posting. AN extra beat in the B part on the run? Gotta go back and fix that.

While you're fixing, you are consistently playing a 4-beat measure as the 2nd and 10th measures of the B section. :ph34r:

 

 

 

Yep. Can't believe I missed that.

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Flatbush Waltz, by Andy Statman. .

 

Another try, hopefully with the errant rhythm in the B part fixed. This time in Am on a C/G Lachenal/Dipper 30 button Anglo

 

My problem was that I was looking at notation, something that almost always messes me up!

Edited by Jim Besser
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A couple more waltzes:

 

http://youtu.be/yHl2stYP8to

 

Back in the late '90s I was part of a group whose lead singer did a lovely waltz-time version of the song "Ned of the Hill." At her/their request--or maybe it was my own idea; I can't remember--I wrote a second waltz to complement the tune. The title "Her Eyes So Blue" was probably conceived as a weak pun on "Her Mantle So Green."

 

We played a complex arrangement with the two waltzes interwoven; here I just play them sequentially, after an intro quoting my tune.

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

Edited by Bob Michel
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Very pleasant Bob. Do you pre-record the accompaniment and then add the concertina melody or do you do it the other way around ? Whatever you do it is very effective and delightfully executed, balanced and co-ordinated.

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Do you pre-record the accompaniment and then add the concertina melody or do you do it the other way around ?

Thanks to Wolf and Rod for the kind words. Typically I just sit down and record something on the concertina (or other main instrument), and then decide what accompaniment, if any, might be suitable.

 

I have tried it t'other way around: e.g., some months back I made a YouTube recording of "Eighth of January" and "Arkansas Traveler" for the Theme of the Month at www.melodeon.net, where I recorded a stringband arrangement in advance and did the video portion (playing melodeon) last, wearing headphones. I was surprised at how awkward and counterintuitive this was. Probably I should take the trouble to start with a scratch track of concertina and replace it with a more polished take later, as I would if recording "serious" audio. But a lot of the enjoyment I get from making the videos comes from doing them quickly and spontaneously. If it started to feel like work I'd probably start avoiding it.

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

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Jeeze, that sounds so much like another waltz I know...can't put my finger on it. Or maybe the same waltz with a different name.

Any useful information here?

 

http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:My_Own_House

 

I've only ever known it as "My Own House," and I probably learned it from the Highwoods, though I've heard an awful lot of versions in the years since.

 

 

 

Nope. It'll come to me.

 

I learned a lot of tunes from Highwoods over the years!

 

 

I know

the Apart of that one as well (though the Bpart is isn't quite the same as what's playing in my head) - maybe I can come up with a name.

Edited by spindizzy
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Jeeze, that sounds so much like another waltz I know...can't put my finger on it. Or maybe the same waltz with a different name.

Any useful information here?http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:My_Own_House

I've only ever known it as "My Own House," and I probably learned it from the Highwoods, though I've heard an awful lot of versions in the years since.

Nope. It'll come to me.

 

I learned a lot of tunes from Highwoods over the years!

I know the Apart of that one as well (though the Bpart is isn't quite the same as what's playing in my head) - maybe I can come up with a name.

The tune playing in my head was Elsey's Waltz.

Which starts out the same, but is a different tune altogether.

 

https://soundcloud.com/chris-jordan-45/elseys-waltz-concertina-net-theme-of-the-month-june-2015

 

edited to change link to soundcloud

Edited by spindizzy
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Bob

 

I just love all of your stuff and recommend that folks investigate your Youtube channel for your non-concertina music.

 

A question: AFAICT you have both a 40 button wooden-ended Wheatstone and a 40 button metal-ended Lachenal. What factors into your choice between the two for a particular piece of music?

 

Don.

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What factors into your choice between the two for a particular piece of music?

Don.

Thanks for the kind words, Don.

 

Probably the biggest factor is simply which of the two I've been playing more recently; I try to give them equal time. That said, there are some differences. The Wheatstone is a late one (1953), but I had a riveted action installed in it by The Button Box years ago. So it's quite fast and responsive. It also has a whopping eight-fold bellows in the South African style, so it's great for chording. And it's loud; it probably goes to more sessions than the other box.

 

The Lachenal had a major makeover in 2013, and I'm simply in love with it, clacky hook-and-lever action and all. It's a bit more demanding to play (though still quite fast), but oh, those reeds. It's sweetly tuned, and its layout is wonderful--I have a pull E in the low octave! Even the action has grown on me: I like an instrument that pushes back a bit. I haven't had the opportunity to play vast numbers of concertinas, but I've gradually formed the impression (and more knowledgeable people have told me in so many words) that it's a highly unusual Lachenal.

 

The upshot? The Wheatstone is certainly more efficient. The Lachenal is more expressive. The Wheatstone is a first-rate tool for a working musician. The Lachenal approaches being a soulmate. I doubt I'd ever part with the Wheatstone. I know I'll never part with the Lachenal.

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

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Looks like there is a sibling to your Lachenal up on eBay right now

Yep, that looks awfully familiar. A bit cleaner than mine was (or is), actually. If it's in decent restorable condition it could be a nice find for someone.

 

Of course, the most important question is whether the whistle and baby's cry buttons work. Mine do!

 

Bob Michel

Near Philly

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Couldn't resist, one more waltz: Larry Unger's Far Away.

 

Larry has written many wonderful waltzes that have become staples on the American contra dance circuit.

 

He has, indeed. But he didn't write this one. Pete Jung (pronounced "Young") did. See page 21 of the Waltz Book.

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Couldn't resist, one more waltz: Larry Unger's Far Away.

 

Larry has written many wonderful waltzes that have become staples on the American contra dance circuit.

 

He has, indeed. But he didn't write this one. Pete Jung (pronounced "Young") did. See page 21 of the Waltz Book.

 

 

Ahhh, you're right.

 

Maybe I should record a genuine Larry Unger waltz like Two Rivers to restore my lost credibility.

 

Or Jay Ungar's Ashoken Farewell, just to confuse matters.

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