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Small/miniature Concertinas?


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I'm not sure if this is the correct forum for this, but here goes...

 

I recently acquired a Marcus Traveller - the small 'travelling' model.

 

I was a bit worried about the size of the keyboard/buttons - would

I be able to manipulate them? The answer is yes - brilliant - I love

this machine (It's LOUD - blow yer socks off at 50 yards - lovely!!!).

 

So, cut to the chase - are there other 'miniature' instruments out

there? I'd love to pick up an 'antique' example. Which companies

made 'em, when did they make 'em, etc?

 

Thanks.

 

Roger

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I think someone recently posted a photo of a Wheatstone miniature here (an EC, as I recall). I once played a Crabb 12-button English that Randy Merris brought to Jim Bessor's house, and it held its own in a room full of other concertinas and accordions. Indeed, Geoff Crabb recently made a miniature and posted a YouTube link to the French (?) performer who used it in his act.

Edited by Mike Franch
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I think someone recently posted a photo of a Wheatstone miniature here (an EC, as I recall). I once played a Crabb 12-button English that Randy Merris brought to Jim Bessor's house, and it held its own in a room full of other concertinas and accordions. Indeed.

 

I think that what Roger is referring to is a smaller-than-standard but fully-keyed instrument. These -- at least anglos -- were apparently made by various makers. Lachenal and Jeffries, for sure, and likely others, but they were and are far less common than the "standard" size. (Of course. Otherwise, they would have been the "standard".)

 

The Dipper County Clare model, though maybe not "vintage", would be in that same class.

 

Geoff Crabb recently made a miniature and posted a YouTube link to the French (?) performer who used it in his act.

I believe that was a Danish circus performer.

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> Sorry, OT, but you always make me kind of jealous with your avatar picture...

 

That is indeed the afore-mentioned Marcus Traveller. Taken on board Pilgrim shortly after acquisition a few

weeks ago...

 

> I think that what Roger is referring to is a smaller-than-standard but fully-keyed instrument. These -- at least

> anglos -- were apparently made by various makers. Lachenal and Jeffries, for sure...

 

Thanks - that's what I wanted to know. I worded my original question somewhat clumsily so my meaning was

not fully clear. I'm thinking in terms of a 20/30-button Anglo though one with only one key would be fine too (I seem

to remember reading somewhere that Cajun music was sometimes performed with single key/row melodeons?).

 

After messing about with the Traveller for a few weeks, I'm intrigued by the idea of these physically smaller

instruments.

 

> The Dipper County Clare model, though maybe not "vintage", would be in that same class.

 

I wasn't aware of that one. I will have a look, thank you. I am thinking in terms of a "vintage" item though.

 

Now I know they exist, I can start looking - ain't seen one yet though...

 

Thanks to all.

 

Roger

Edited by lachenal74693
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Roger,

Please see my article--R. Merris, "Miniature and Semi-miniature Concertinas," Papers of the International Concertina Association, Vol. 9 (2012), pp. 8-39. In addition to the text, there are lots of images of miniatures, semi-miniatures, key layouts, and some of the many concertina professionals who played them. (I wish the images were in color, which really would show off their style.)

The article is archived at the International Concertina Association website--www.concertina.org. Click on the PICA tab on the left of the home page. Click on PICA Vol. 9. Click on Download PICA09-2012 (18MB)

I think the article will contain just about all you want to know about miniature concertinas and semi-miniature concertinas. (Maybe even more than you want to know!)

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I happen to have a very pretty little Lachenal of about this class -- 26 button C/G Anglo -- 5.3" across the flats.

 

Lovely! I have taken the liberty of copying this picture for my small-but-expanding 'archive'. That is exactly the

sort of instrument I am now looking for. Thank you

 

Bob Tedrow was making a "concertiny" at one point: http://hmi.homewood.net/mini/

 

Yes, I had spotted that one. Thank you. I see these folks also do rather nice looking ukuleles (No, no, I must be strong...).

 

Please see my article--R. Merris, "Miniature and Semi-miniature Concertinas," Papers of the International

Concertina Association, Vol. 9 (2012), pp. 8-39....(Maybe even more than you want to know!)

 

Oh, goodie - looks fascinating. Thank you very much. What an interesting looking journal - I must download the other

volumes.

 

Roger.

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  • 1 month later...

Button Box currently has an 18-button Aeola miniature (EC) listed . . .

 

I am the fortunate owner of a 30b Dipper Clare. I have lately been playing a Morse Geordie Tenor EC, but only because I've been seized by the yearning to have more notes, and lower notes. The Dipper Clare is a wondrous little creation indeed. With a big voice, too.

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I only just noticed that this thread has sprung to life again, so:

 

I had a look at the PICA article on small instruments. Fascinating stuff! I now realise that

what I am after is a 'semi-miniature' instrument.

 

I looked at the 18 button Aeola. If I have understood correctly, that is a form of English? I

am currently an Anglo player (though the way things are going, I could be interested in

an English before long).

 

I have just been contacted by someone who may have a semi-miniature for sale. Ooh goodie!

 

Roger

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yes, the BB's 18-button seems to be an EC. no thumbstrap needed, it seems.

 

RE miniature Anglos---have you seen/heard Noel Hill play his mini-Wheatstone Anglo? It is usually part of a Noel Hill concert, and as charming as hell. He does make a joyful noise with it.

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While we are on this topic - do you have a suggestion of case for small size concertina (5.5 inches across the flats)?

 

I just managed to find myself a small 26 buttons Lachenal concertina, it's really nice instrument.

 

I thought about getting a case for carrying mandolin and concertina in one case, but it could be hard to find somebody to make such a case, and it will, probably, be expensive (here's a thread on mandolincase forums). So now I'm thinking about possible options of getting small padded case for this concertina so I can carry it together with my mandolin (or probably even clip it on a mandolin case)

 

Thanks

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Applied physics: pressure = force / area... The smaller the instrument, the higher the air-pressure inside, the louder!

Ah, that make sense!

 

I have a Tedrow concerTiny, one row, in D. I'm ashamed to say I don't play it much, but it sure is LOUD!

I have Norman mini in C (plus 3 accidentals). This 4-inch across flats box is also very LOUD!

It is suitable for outdoor playing. I play it St. Paddy's day parade every year.

My only regret was I need longer bellows.

 

 

 

 

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