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Used Peacock Hayden On Ebay (Uk, Close 21 Nov)


MatthewVanitas
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Hey Trayton! Glad to have another Hayden player aboard!

 

We could definitely use your insight in any review threads we have of the Peacock, as only a couple of us have written of our experiences with the CC Peacock and BB Beaumont Hayden models so far.

 

If you get a chance to introduce yourself in the General section later, it's always great to see the diversity of styles of players of the Hayden, since we seem to have quite a span of influences that lead people to choose that system.

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Yeah, I know it starts only from C, but I'm just wondering if there is such a difference.

There's also this one which is also smaller, but doesn't boast such a loud sound:

http://www.wakker-concertinas.com/E-3.htm

 

I can't understand why the removal of 5 notes on the bottom changes the loudness, that's

why I'm asking. I'd rather get a loud 37 key instrument starting from G.

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Yeah, I know it starts only from C, but I'm just wondering if there is such a difference.

There's also this one which is also smaller, but doesn't boast such a loud sound:

http://www.wakker-concertinas.com/E-3.htm

 

I can't understand why the removal of 5 notes on the bottom changes the loudness, that's

why I'm asking. I'd rather get a loud 37 key instrument starting from G.

Perhaps as there is a 'photos not yet available' this could signify that Wim has yet to make one,so he is reserving comment on its characteristics?

 

Smaller concertinas can be louder due to having a smaller crossection and thus more air pressure created for the same amount of push/pull effort and less internal Mass to dampen the sound. The power advantage of a Jeffries over a Wheatstone Anglo could have something to do with the slightly smaller size of the Jeffries.

 

Another factor could be the Mass of the Reedpan... with less reeds a 30 key Anglo does not have as much weight as a 48 English, so there is not so much material to deaden the sound of the reed.... perhaps the effect is slight but the result could be significant enough.

 

One last suggestion; on an Anglo with a non-radial reedpan all the reeds ( or almost all) are organised in-line with the grain of the wood. I think this might have an affect on the output volume of the instrument because vibration of the reedpan is not constricted across the grain. No proof, just a theory.

Edited by Geoff Wooff
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