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Improving The Wikipedia Article "concertina"


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Dan mentions Joe Hooneberg in the past tense. Sean Minnie, whom I last heard from in the US, once offered for sale an English (baritone-treble, if I remember correctly). I think he played more than one kind of concertina, though I don't remember which type was his main one. Is someone else still in contact with him? I think he might be able to tell us a lot about the history, maybe provide additional contacts.

 

Which leaves me wondering... do we have any Boer players here on concertina.net?

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Steve, while you're fixing English, Dan Worral notes at least one notable Boer musician playing the English: http://books.google.com.co/books?id=JKZO1aevsiIC&pg=PA30&dq=boeremusiek+duet+concertina&hl=en&sa=X&ei=C2RqVIalIYqkNsusgsgH&ved=0CBoQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=boeremusiek%20duet%20concertina&f=false

 

And note per the Boeremusiek.org.za site I cited above, the English is called the "four row", which would be "4-ry" in Afrikaans. The same site also notes that the Boer use the term "English" to mean "English-style build" vice German, so "English concertina" doesn't mean what we call English, but rather an Anglo by Lachenal or Wheatstone (or in niche cases an English or Duet).

 

Note: if there are any GoogleBooks pages you want to cite, http://reftag.appspot.comcan instantly turn any GoogleBooks links into a full Wikipedia footnote with just a click.

 

Done - but if you've any more to add to the English page please do pitch right in, I'm only doing it because nobody else has put their hand up.

 

That goes for anyone else as well, come on in the water's lovely (even if the page editor is fairly gnarly).

 

I've got some more stuff in the pipeline but want to do a bit of reference checking first. There's probably only Matthew & myself reading this thread now, so I'm just going to get on with it rather than publicising every change here :)

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I've got some more stuff in the pipeline but want to do a bit of reference checking first. There's probably only Matthew & myself reading this thread now, so I'm just going to get on with it rather than publicising every change here :)

 

 

Oh, I'm reading it, though with not enough "spare" time to contribute anything useful of my own.

 

But you all certainly don't have to announce every little change here. I can always check Wikipedia from time to time. :)

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  • 2 months later...

Just took 15 minutes and knocked out a quick bio on the inventor of the "big square German concertinas":

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Friedrich_Uhlig'>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Friedrich_Uhlig

 

Interestingly enough, the only Wikipedia that had a bio on him prior to this was Finnish Wikipedia. Any chance we have any German or French speakers (or any other language really) that can take a minute to help translate this article so we can put it up on other languages' Wikipedias?

 

Since he shuffled off this mortal coil nearly a century and a half ago, his photo is fortunately firmly in the public domain.

 

2lu5noo.jpg

Edited by MatthewVanitas
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Just took 15 minutes and knocked out a quick bio on the inventor of the "big square German concertinas":

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Friedrich_Uhlig

 

Interestingly enough, the only Wikipedia that had a bio on him prior to this was Finnish Wikipedia. Any chance we have any German or French speakers (or any other language really) that can take a minute to help translate this article so we can put it up on other languages' Wikipedias?

 

I'll gladly settle this for de.wikipedia.org over the next weekend!

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Thanks for the help! If anyone else speaks a language, but isn't familiar with Wikipedia editing and doesn't want to learn, I can just take your translation and code it into Wikipedia for you for any concertina article, just ping me if needed.

 

I also just whipped up this article on the Carlsfelder concertina: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlsfelder_concertina

 

I'm still not totally clear on how a Carlsfelder differs from a Chemnitzer, but I did my best to dig up cited material and footnote it in, so at least the basic facts are out there. If anyone happens to have a photo, to which you yourself own the rights or was published prior to 1923, or a Carslfelder, I'd be happy to add that to the article.

 

 

UPDATE: Also created the "Category:Concertina makers", since we have four such articles now and they should be sub-categorized together: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Concertina_makers

Edited by MatthewVanitas
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And note per the Boeremusiek.org.za site I cited above, the English is called the "four row", which would be "4-ry" in Afrikaans. The same site also notes that the Boer use the term "English" to mean "English-style build" vice German, so "English concertina" doesn't mean what we call English, but rather an Anglo by Lachenal or Wheatstone (or in niche cases an English or Duet).

 

 

 

Based on 'our' own (Crabb) involvement (1930 -1989) with supplying instruments to South Africa, here are some general observations.

 

In South Africa, Anglo concertinas of British make were/are commonly referred to as; ‘Wheatstone’ or ‘English’ concertinas. Not to be confused with the English system.

In general,

20 Button instruments were/are known as ‘Two Row’.

30 Button instruments were/are known as ‘Three Row’ (Can include 31 & 32 Buttons).

40 Button instruments were/are known as ‘Three & three quarter Row’.

Hexagonal instruments were/are known as ‘Six cornered’.

Octagonal instruments were/are known as ‘Eight cornered’.

 

English System, Crane Duet System and Wheatstone/Maccann Duet System derivatives were/are referred to as Four, Five and Six row instruments respectively.

 

Geoffrey

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  • 4 months later...

I continue to make little improvements here and there to concertina articles. I also just knocked out a new one, and could use any suggestions/improvements on it. Again, I emphasize that any info added has to be backed up to some sort of source which is published in some reasonably credible venue; concertina.com and concertina.net articles are probably a real gray area, but forum posts aren't citeable. Books or published magazines/newsletters are optimal to cite.

 

Take a look, let me know what needs changing:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hill_Maccann'>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Hill_Maccann

Edited by MatthewVanitas
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I did write a bio on John Butterworth (who patented the Crane duet system) - it's available as a .pdf download from the Crane Concertina site here - if you want to link that into the article, you're welcome.

 

John Hill Maccann is a different kettle of fish, a story still being researched, full of bigamy, desertion, and misinformation. May take a while.

 

Andrew

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