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Jim Besser

Theme Of The Month For November, 2014: Something Irish

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...the idea of emulating the robust style of the older Anglo players I met in Co.Clare. A certain 'along the rows' flavour...

 

This remark from Geoff led me to record this, played on a 20-button multi-reed Scholer.

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Thats another favorite of mine.

Played in the octaves?

Nice!

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I have never played in the Irish style, and am not certain what it entails. I just played this melody only and tried to keep a good rhythm.Hope this qualifies as "Irish Style":)

 

https://soundcloud.com/ariaqueezehammer/merrily-kiss-the-quaker-3

 

You're making amazing progress on that Morse G/D!

 

Thanks so much. This TOTM forum has been such a good learning tool for me.

 

 

And the builder of your new dulcimer says hi. (He came to our dance tonight).

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Thats another favorite of mine.

Played in the octaves?

Nice!

 

If that's a response to my post, thanks! The concertina I was playing has multiple reeds for each note, generally two tuned an octave apart. So it sounds in octaves, but I was playing only one button at a time. I do sometimes play in octaves by playing multiple buttons, but on that concertina it takes so much air pressure to even play one button at a time that I wouldn't generally try it, especially on a reel.

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...the idea of emulating the robust style of the older Anglo players I met in Co.Clare. A certain 'along the rows' flavour...

 

This remark from Geoff led me to record this, played on a 20-button multi-reed Scholer.

 

 

Wow, that really sounds like a button accordion! Nicely done. I have one of those multivoiced Scholers, but it's hopelessly out of tune.

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Thanks a lot Jim and Don, good to know you like "my" tune,

 

and here's another one:

 

Down By The Sally Gardens

which you might like as well then...

 

(and Daria, listened to the first track of yours as yet, wich is very nice, and prompting me to resume this great jig - which I used to play on my PA previously - with the EC now)

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I don't make any claims to play in Irish style but there are several Irish tunes I enjoy playing.

 

Here is a little medley of two O'Carolan tunes; Eleanor Plunkett and Fanny Powers played on my Anglo with added accompaniment.

 

As I've said before, I'm essentially a melody player on the Anglo - at least for tunes - so I add accompaniment using other instruments.

 

 

Edit: Oops! I forgot to add the link

 

Edited by Tootler

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Thanks a lot Jim and Don, good to know you like "my" tune,

 

and here's another one:

 

Down By The Sally Gardens

which you might like as well then...

 

(and Daria, listened to the first track of yours as yet, wich is very nice, and prompting me to resume this great jig - which I used to play on my PA previously - with the EC now)

Very well played Wolf. I liked the counter melodies in the harmony and starting with just the melody then adding harmony. Very nice indeed.

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Thanks a lot Jim and Don, good to know you like "my" tune,

 

and here's another one:

 

Down By The Sally Gardens

which you might like as well then...

 

(and Daria, listened to the first track of yours as yet, wich is very nice, and prompting me to resume this great jig - which I used to play on my PA previously - with the EC now)

 

Excellent. You are able to resist the tendency to speed up a slow air like this - a tendency that plagues me.

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Thanks a lot Jim and Don, good to know you like "my" tune,

 

and here's another one:

 

Down By The Sally Gardens

which you might like as well then...

 

(and Daria, listened to the first track of yours as yet, wich is very nice, and prompting me to resume this great jig - which I used to play on my PA previously - with the EC now)

 

Excellent. You are able to resist the tendency to speed up a slow air like this - a tendency that plagues me.

 

Thanks a lot for the fine compliments Jim (as I'm pretty familiar with that disease) and Geoff (will give your track a listen ASAP, which won't be in the office I guess; am curious about the "other instruments", good that you didn't spoil the anticipation by naming them...)!

 

Best wishes - Wolf

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Thats another favorite of mine.

Played in the octaves?

Nice!

 

If that's a response to my post, thanks! The concertina I was playing has multiple reeds for each note, generally two tuned an octave apart. So it sounds in octaves, but I was playing only one button at a time. I do sometimes play in octaves by playing multiple buttons, but on that concertina it takes so much air pressure to even play one button at a time that I wouldn't generally try it, especially on a reel.

Interesting. I tried playing my Anglo in octaves as per Scan Tester but my fingers kept getting mixed up so I just play it single note style for melodies. I believe Scan Tester did it to get more volume but these days with PA that's less necessary.

 

Nice playing, though. Had an Irish feel to it.

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Some really nice stuff this month. I like it all but I am surprised that, so far, we have had no real die-hard ITM breakneck Anglo playing.

 

Going out on a limb here and I will probably get shot down for this suggestion, but listening to Geoff's Valentia Harbour this is not the first time that a Sean Nos tune has reminded me of Portuguese Fado. I really know nothing about either genres but they both have a sad, mournful slow sound. Maybe they both use the same flatted scales?

 

Anyway, great stuff from Geoff, Wolf and all of the others. Thank you.

 

Don.

The sound scape of Sean Nos airs can have similar impressions on the senses to those one can feel with singing from other cultures it is true.

 

I have noticed those feelings listening to singing from India and other places where older traditions have been passed on without too many modern influences. Solo singing is a perfect vehicle for conveying an intended emotion because Modes can be expressed well by subtle adjustments to the pitch and tone of notes. That vocal control of tone and pitch is hardly available to us on an instrument like a concertina so a rendition of this nature needs , at least, a degree of understanding of the story or of imagining the feelings behind the creation of the piece.

 

This type of music is I find easier to play on the Pipes where a control of vocal tone colour and the ability to shade and slide notes into just a 'right' pitch and ,of course, how these notes relate to the Drones and the resulting set of perfect intervals that rarely occur with Instruments tuned to Equal Temperament, all have a profound if very subtle effect on the ear of the listener.

 

The problem I find with making 'self-recordings' of this type of music is that the practical action of working the recording machine can detract from the 'inner space' I am looking for to bring the melody across in a genuine fashion..... A feeling not disimmilar from that when attempting to play a piece like this as a short interlude during a session of Reels.

 

So, thanks Don (and Ruediger) and all who said nice things about the recording.

 

Geoff.

Edited by Geoff Wooff

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A couple of standard double jigs: Junior Crehan's classic composition The Mist-Covered Mountain followed by Tatter Jack Walsh. An attempt at a bit of irish on the English.

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A couple of standard double jigs: Junior Crehan's classic composition The Mist-Covered Mountain followed by Tatter Jack Walsh. An attempt at a bit of irish on the English.

 

On an English? Impressive? I know the first one, but haven't heard the second until now - great tune.

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I'm new to the forum (see my post "Delurking" in "General Concertina Discussion"). Since ITM is most of what I do on the instrument, I figured I may as well pitch right in on this Theme. So here's a favorite set dance played on a 40 button Lachenal Anglo. No slur intended against any Gaugers in the group.

 

Bob Michel

 

http://youtu.be/VodzZoepooA

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I'm new to the forum (see my post "Delurking" in "General Concertina Discussion"). Since ITM is most of what I do on the instrument, I figured I may as well pitch right in on this Theme. So here's a favorite set dance played on a 40 button Lachenal Anglo. No slur intended against any Gaugers in the group.

 

Bob Michel

 

http://youtu.be/VodzZoepooA

Welcome, Bob. Nicely played in the good old style. Nice looking/sounding flute you have there too!

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Thanks, chas, for the kind words. It's one of Terry McGee's, actually, a Pratten style with a short foot, and it is indeed a very fine instrument. I've been been neglecting the flute shamefully in recent years, and putting up a few videos has been sort of an expiatory exercise.

 

Bob Michel

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Great playing Michael.

Love that style, not too fast, not too ornamental.

Enjoying your you tube channel aswell.

Welcome to the forum.

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