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I recently got a 1952 Wheatstone Anglo to replace my Rochelle. I used a pair of M400s to mic the Rochelle, but I find that the Velcro strips don't stick well to the Wheatstone. Would you try a different adhesive or would you switch to mics on stands?

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Are you using fresh Velcro strips or have you peeled off the old strips with the hope of using them again ? I found that re-using the strips did not work too well.

 

Mics on stands will probably sound better but it is a lot of extra hardwear to shift.

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I prefer to use stitch-on Velcro.

 

You will need to take the ends off and remove the fretwork. You can then use strong thread to stitch the Velcro on. It will never come off by accident and can easily be removed by cutting the stitches. There is no risk of adhesive damaging the finish of the ends.

 

Steve

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I have seen so many instruments with spoiled finishes from self adhesive Velcro, please try to find another solution, and if you try to 'clean' the fretting you can damage the polish, plus if you press too hard you can crack the old and very dry, thin wood. I know the instrument is still only middle aged, but I guess that even meths would spoil the polish

 

clip on, or mics on sticks have got to be better, I do like the idea of stitching on as well.

 

Dave

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but I guess that even meths would spoil the polish

If the finish is French polish then meths will definitely spoil it - meths (and alcohol) is used a solvent for shellac.

 

If you must clean a French polish finish of grease, oils and other accumulations, then use white spirit (which is not a solvent of shellac).

Edited by SteveS
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When I had a pair of these, I didn't want to stick velcro to the body of the instrument so I stuck them to the side of the wooden bracket carrying the hand straps, where it was practically invisible and I didn't have to worry about marking the finish.

 

I now use a pair of AKG C416 goosenecks which I lash to the straps themselves using velcro cable ties, This is fairly quick to swap between instruments.

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clip on, or mics on sticks have got to be better, I do like the idea of stitching on as well.

 

Dave

It may sound a bit naff but for nearly 40 years now I (and my wife too, come to that) have successfully attached mics to an EC with bits of elastic (Is it called that outside the UK?). We used this method with cheap tie-clip condenser mics for a few years before buying some M400s, which we continued to attach in the same way. We've never had a problem over hundreds of ceilidh band gigs.

Originally, we would thread a bit of elastic through the fretwork then knot it to form a small loop into which the mic fits snugly and securely, held against the side of the instrument. Admittedly, this looked a tad scruffy - Chris Algar was unimpressed when he saw our Wheatstone thus adorned! Even when trying to use velcro, we threaded the lead through the elastic for security, but I've abandoned velcro now because of the damage to the finish.

These days, we cut a short length of elastic, tie it to form a loop, stretch this over the thumbstrap and then under the end of the strap where it emerges beyond the screw on top of the concertina. That way, we only need leave it on for the duration of the gig. With the right amount of tension, there's no damage to the instrument and the mic is firmly held.

They're not top quality mics, after all so this low tech approach has always seemed somehow appropriate. :)

But yes, for better quality, go for expensive clip ons, AKG or whatever.

 

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Thank you for all the great advice. I've noticed a small change to the finish (if the light is right - or should I say, wrong) where I applied the Velcro, so the possibility of finish damage is certainly there. I like the idea of putting something through the fretwork, either sewing non-adhesive Velcro or using some elastic. I'll give that a try.

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but I guess that even meths would spoil the polish

If the finish is French polish then meths will definitely spoil it - meths (and alcohol) is used a solvent for shellac.

 

If you must clean a French polish finish of grease, oils and other accumulations, then use white spirit (which is not a solvent of shellac).

 

 

Steve,

 

I am well aware of this, but others may not be, however a 1952 instrument may well have been cellulose sprayed, hence my slight obfuscation

 

D

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