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I made a chart for myself, partly as a side-trip of something else I'm working on. While it isn't particularly spectacular and some of my digital photo editing, color matching, etc., was a challenge, I do kind of like this.

 

So, I'll post it here. It's also posted in my blog, so if one doesn't work out, the other will.

 

prkkc4gnipk1ukiadwvo.jpg

 

Besides here at in my blog, this is also found at box.com/concertinachartrootswendy

 

I don't like to rely on charts or printed music, but if I have something visual, it will make a space in my mind and I think it does help me to a degree.

 

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I think this sort of thing can be good ,especially if it helps you memorise the note positions.

 

I find that I'm more inclinded to memorise the 'sound positions' and if someone asks " ah, what note is that you are playing?" I'd have to think.

 

Still Wendy, this looks fun and much better than my Bass Stave crib sheet .

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I think this sort of thing can be good ,especially if it helps you memorise the note positions.

 

I find that I'm more inclinded to memorise the 'sound positions' and if someone asks " ah, what note is that you are playing?" I'd have to think.

 

Still Wendy, this looks fun and much better than my Bass Stave crib sheet .

 

Uh…. Base Stave? Well, I guess maybe if you're playing a bass concertina…

 

 

Like these too. I can see that for some people's learning styles the colours will be very helpful.

 

I, for one, do find the colors helpful, on some things. I was vaguely trying, just for fun, to follow along with using the actual planetary colors assigned to tones (re, 'The Cosmic Octave,' book by Hans Cousto) -- but that didn't really work out for me. (The scrapbook companies that make the paper fasteners, or 'brads,' just are not all that cosmic, I guess… :wacko: )

 

I just now found this site, too -- Music note or sound colors -- which is totally different from the planetary color arrangement. I haven't even looked that over.

 

Thing is, I really don't have a sincere interest in color sciences behind musical tones. But once I started using colored markers and brads to make some charts, I found that does really help add to things for me.

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I think this sort of thing can be good ,especially if it helps you memorise the note positions.

 

I find that I'm more inclinded to memorise the 'sound positions' and if someone asks " ah, what note is that you are playing?" I'd have to think.

 

Still Wendy, this looks fun and much better than my Bass Stave crib sheet .

 

Uh…. Base Stave? Well, I guess maybe if you're playing a bass concertina…

 

 

Sorry ,I've probably used the wrong term for this... I was refering to what some would call the Left hand Staff (or Stave) in written Piano music.

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I think this sort of thing can be good ,especially if it helps you memorise the note positions.

 

I find that I'm more inclinded to memorise the 'sound positions' and if someone asks " ah, what note is that you are playing?" I'd have to think.

 

Still Wendy, this looks fun and much better than my Bass Stave crib sheet .

 

Uh…. Base Stave? Well, I guess maybe if you're playing a bass concertina…

 

 

Sorry ,I've probably used the wrong term for this... I was refering to what some would call the Left hand Staff (or Stave) in written Piano music.

 

 

Treble clef... is the G clef; Bass clef.... oh yeah, I forgot! Left had piano music. It's been so long since I've bothered with that, since playing the concertina, that I was thinking it was somehow something even way lower than piano music. I think I was secretly happy to disregard the bass cleff, so I just conveniently forgot all about it. :lol:

 

 

Thanks to Wendy

Your picture on my tablet results a nice visual help to find quickly and easily the commoner chords

 

Eddy

 

Nice! :) I was happy to discover that I can even see it enough without my glasses on. I'm stuck wearing them most of the time, now.

 

I used picmonkey.com to edit my photo, and I use a Chromebook (all very Google). I don't know a lot about computers or software to start with, and then things keep changing, too (i.e., dropped my smartphone and broke it, didn't want to replace it). So I prefer to make an actual physical chart, photograph it, and edit the photo. I'm sure there's a way to make the colors more 'accurate' but I was done sitting at the computer... :P

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