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Three Score And Ten


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Ok, the Dubliners' version... :)

 

Further Comments? :D

Some significant differences from the melody I'm used to, so I went to YouTube to listen to The Dubliners. Yep, their melody on the verse is rather different from the one that I understand was collected from Yorkshire fishermen. There's also a short bit in the chorus where I think you may have taken their harmony as the melody, since I can hear "my" melody in one of their other voices. But that's the folk process for you. :)

 

The Dubliners also have some differences in the words, and I wonder where they got them. One in particular seems to me to diminish the story: They sing "methinks I see a wee small craft" where I'm used to "methinks I see a host of craft"... and "a host" is certainly more expressive of the nature and scope of the tragedy, as well as being more consistent with the rest of the song (e.g., "many hundreds more were drowned").

 

As for your playing and singing, that's more difficult, because our personal styles and interpretations are rather different. I do have the feeling that you're getting the result you want, and that's what should be most important to you. If I have a "criticism", it would be that your accompaniment reminds me slightly of the calliope music on a carousel... nice in it's own right, but for me not quite in keeping with the nature of the story you're telling.

 

But definitely, keep up your contributions. :)

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Hi Jim,

 

thank you so much for your in-depth reviewing!

 

As to the details: For whatever reason (maybe just because it's so familiar) I do like this version of the melody better. I had been aware of possibly having chosen at least one note from the harmony singing which however had been significant in my listening to their recording right from the start.

 

I hadn't been sure with the text variety and was about creating a somewhat mixed version but ended up with just the Dubliners' words. However, it had just been the "wee small craft" what biased me towards their version; the "host" having been mentioned in the first line the "wee small" might be regarded as looking at the single specimen with few men and boys on board, in order to make things more descriptive and moving...

 

Maybe I'll nevertheless work on the text (of the third verse as well) some day...

 

Back to the music, your calliope reference, based on your fine observation and knowledge, seems in fact to rather fortifying me in what I'm doing here (not sure as yet, but this is my second thought after having considered the criticism). Seems like I'll have just this concept in mind from now on, which would be singing what in German would be called a "Moritat", but with sympathy (would you say, these two don't go together?). Thus you're giving me a criticism which I will have to consider but more likely turn into just making more clear what I'm trying to achieve... :)

 

Finally, thank you once again Jim for the critique as well as the encouragement and attention in general! You will have noticed my being in a stage of further developing my skills and style, and such input is highly valuable!

 

Best wishes - Wolf

 

edited to add: Jim, could you point me at a recording, preferably from your side, otherwise a third party track, demonstrating your interpretation to some extent? would really appreciate that!

Edited by blue eyed sailor
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Jim, could you point me at a recording, preferably from your side, otherwise a third party track, demonstrating your interpretation to some extent? would really appreciate that!

 

Expect an email from me, Wolf, though maybe not for a week or so. Trying to get various things sorted out before I start a 24-hour train trip Tuesday morning. :o :)

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The Dubliners also have some differences in the words, and I wonder where they got them. One in particular seems to me to diminish the story: They sing "methinks I see a wee small craft" where I'm used to "methinks I see a host of craft"... and "a host" is certainly more expressive of the nature and scope of the tragedy, as well as being more consistent with the rest of the song (e.g., "many hundreds more were drowned").

 

OOPS! I wasn't paying proper attention.

 

My "criticism" still stands, but I mixed up a couple of lines from the version I know. (It's been a while since I've sung it.) Where Wolf sings "methinks I see a wee small craft and crew with hearts so brave", the words I'm used to are "methinks I see on board each craft a crew with hearts so brave". So no repetition of the earlier line "methinks I see a host of craft".

 

Sorry for the confusion.

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The Dubliners apparently tried to put the song in a wider perspective from the distance, swapping "our" to "their", emphasising both the helplessness and nobleness a.s.f., slightly more melodramatic one might say, which howeverI didn't find that bad as a starting point, and maybe fitting with my approach in terms of music (in their footpaths) as well...

 

Thank you Jim for the correction and Alex for the hint to Liam Robinson, will look after that CD "Muddy Banks", and thank you for the "like" as well Alex, much appreciated!

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  • 3 weeks later...

So here's just another version of my treating the song, with one verse sort of adapted from the original poem (thank you so much Jim!):

 

Methinks I see them yet again,

The midnight hour was passed.

Their little craft was battling there

Against the fiery blast.

Methinks I read the thoughts of them

Who now are called away;

All thinking of their loved ones dear

Who were at home to stay.

and some changes as to the music too:

 

 

Three Score and Ten - reworked

 

Hope you'll be joining my preferring this take... :)

Edited by blue eyed sailor
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