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Jim Besser

Tune Of The Month For May, 2014: Michael Turner's Waltz

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Sorry for the delay, folks, but it was Mayday and I was up at dawn playing for my two bleary eyed Morris groups.

 

But we won't let that stop us from enjoying May's winner - by a big margin. Michael Turner's Waltz, also known as part of "Six German Dances" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, is not too hard to learn and sounds wonderful on concertinas of every variety.

 

Here's notation for one (of many) versions of his great waltz. It's most commonly played in G, but feel free to play it in the key that works best for you - or in multiple keys, if you're so inclined. I've heard lovely versions that stripped the melody down a bit, and equally lovely ones that elaborate extensively on the melody.

 

a version on English concertina and
on a 20 button Anglo. Also one on melodeon and one by a band.
This is a great tune for relative beginners as well as advanced players. Don't be shy: the TOTM is fun as well as a great boost to learning.

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So, here's my first attempt, pre-recorded spontaneously anticipating the more and more likely result of the poll:

 

Michael Turner's Waltz.

 

I might add that listening to Danny's fine playing this tune had been an obvious and welcome landmark whilst developing fully harmonized playing skills some two years ago... thank you for that and many more great and inspiring recordings, Danny!

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Nice tune, but sounds like maybe a hambo or some other triple time tune to me. Probably just me though... Still, Mozart called it a "German Dance" which is more likely to be a Minuet (in the German style--al la Haydn), or more accurately one of the many other 3/4 tune types.

Edited by cboody

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Nice tune, but sounds like maybe a hambo or some other triple time tune to me. Probably just me though... Still, Mozart called it a "German Dance" which is more likely to be a Minuet (in the German style--al la Haydn), or more accurately one of the many other 3/4 tune types.

 

Hi Chuck, since I've been pairing this one with another, very well-known Minuet, this is most likely my understanding as well. It's definitely no Waltz. Now that you're raising the topic the Austrian "Ländler" come to my mind as well.

 

Best wishes - Wolf

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So, here's my first attempt, pre-recorded spontaneously anticipating the more and more likely result of the poll:

 

Michael Turner's Waltz.

 

I might add that listening to Danny's fine playing this tune had been an obvious and welcome landmark whilst developing fully harmonized playing skills some two years ago... thank you for that and many more great and inspiring recordings, Danny!

 

Very nice :). The sort of arrangement that I might aspire to.

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Thank you Robert and (on the SC) Alex, very glad that you like the arrangement resp. playing!

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Nice tune, but sounds like maybe a hambo or some other triple time tune to me. Probably just me though... Still, Mozart called it a "German Dance" which is more likely to be a Minuet (in the German style--al la Haydn), or more accurately one of the many other 3/4 tune types.

 

Hi Chuck, since I've been pairing this one with another, very well-known Minuet, this is most likely my understanding as well. It's definitely no Waltz. Now that you're raising the topic the Austrian "Ländler" come to my mind as well.

 

Best wishes - Wolf

 

Ländler! The very word I was looking for and couldn't find! Spot on I think Wolf. Thanks.

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I hope I am like many who always have a go at TOTM but would never consider recording it myself. Can I ask a technical question please, as this tune has a very good example of this particular beginners dilemma. Played on a G/D in the key of G how is it best to tackle the G/F#/E/D notes at bars 3 to 4. Is it best to drop on to the D row and try and work out chords as best as possible, but keep the same right hand position or, to keep on the G row but move the right hand up to the last few buttons? I hope this question makes sense and apologies if this has been asked before. Thanks.

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Hello Derek,

 

I keep on the G row for this, except for the G itself which I play on the D row draw using the middle finger. As for shifting up the row for the high notes, I do that constantly. Hope this helps!

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I went back to the Mozart for my rendition.

 

I'm playing the 1st Violin part with my right hand and an accompaniment based mostly on the bassoon parts (Fagotti) with my left. I'd love to be able to work the 2nd Violin part in as well, but not in this lifetime.

 

Hear a real orchestra play it here. Cue to 2:29 (Trio of the 2nd German Dance).

 

Edited to add: As always, 46-key Hayden Duet. The Wheatstone this time.

 

Edited by David Barnert

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Very nice recording. I actually play this tune on the melodeon but have never played it on the concertina. I was reminded of it last weekend at the Scandinavian Squeeze-in though. Maybe will join in this month.

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I was reminded of it last weekend at the Scandinavian Squeeze-in though.

Really? :D

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I went back to the Mozart for my rendition.

 

I'm playing the 1st Violin part with my right hand and an accompaniment based mostly on the bassoon parts (Fagotti) with my left. I'd love to be able to work the 2nd Violin part in as well, but not in this lifetime.

 

For anyone who might find it useful, here's a leadsheet I put together with chords based on that Mozart scoring (I find it easier to have the harmony summarized like that, rather than have to always read down all the parts--particularly when there are transposing instruments involved).

 

I've never heard anyone play this in a folk context, so I don't know what chords, if any, are normally used when it's going under the name of "Michael Turner's". I'd imagine they're more or less on the Mozart lines, eh?

Mozart Deutsche Tanze 2 (Trio).pdf

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I've never heard anyone play this in a folk context, so I don't know what chords, if any, are normally used when it's going under the name of "Michael Turner's". I'd imagine they're more or less on the Mozart lines, eh?

 

Thanks. I'm sure most of us "folkies" would put an Am7 on the 3rd beat of the first full measure. Even the bassoon parts that I played have A and C (as does the melody), which suggests an A minor (or Am7) even though Mozart put an F# in the 2nd violin part at the same time, which makes it more of a D7 (or F# diminished) tonality.

 

 

 

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I've never heard anyone play this in a folk context, so I don't know what chords, if any, are normally used when it's going under the name of "Michael Turner's". I'd imagine they're more or less on the Mozart lines, eh?

 

Thanks. I'm sure most of us "folkies" would put an Am7 on the 3rd beat of the first full measure. Even the bassoon parts that I played have A and C (as does the melody), which suggests an A minor (or Am7) even though Mozart put an F# in the 2nd violin part at the same time, which makes it more of a D7 (or F# diminished) tonality.

It's just an Amin triad (or open fifth, as the third is in the melody) as for me, having no "G" note sounding at that point.

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For anyone who might find it useful, here's a leadsheet I put together with chords based on that Mozart scoring (I find it easier to have the harmony summarized like that, rather than have to always read down all the parts--particularly when there are transposing instruments involved).

So do I.

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