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How About Baritone-Anglos?


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I've never seen or tried one but do you know the brilliant CD of Cormac Begley and Jack Talty, two anglos together, one of them a baritone. It's called Na Fir Bolg:

 

http://tradconnect.com/profiles/blogs/review-jack-talty-cormac-begley-na-bolg-irish-traditional-music

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwYVBzIffoQ

 

Glorious stuff.

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I am interested in a baritone anglo. Does anybody own one? I would like to see the inside and get an idea of the dimensions??? What keys do they come in? Who made them??

 

Robert, I recommend you search for old threads here on concertina.net. (I use Google's "Advanced Search", which is far more reliable than the built-in search here.) I just did a search, restricted to the domain "concertina.net" for the phrase "baritone anglo", and it turned up 86 results. Several of those were in the "Buy and Sell" section. I didn't look through them all, but makers' names I noticed included Lachenal, Wheatstone, Dipper, Geuns-Wakker, and Tedrow.

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I've never seen or tried one but do you know the brilliant CD of Cormac Begley and Jack Talty, two anglos together, one of them a baritone. It's called Na Fir Bolg:

 

Funnily enough, I sold that Lachenal Bb/F baritone to Cormac, and I was working on it - making a slight modification for him - only this morning.

 

In fact he kept me pretty busy on my Sunday and Monday "days off", doing work on his 38-key Ab/Eb Jeffries and on his Suttner 38-key C/G too. :(

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What keys do they come in? An old article of mine on the static side (not currently linked but clearly a candidate for it) is

Anglo keys article

I have a few more odd (non-baritone) keys to add to the list.

 

I should add that I have, since writing the article, become convinced that at least some Lachenals that were not C/G (made originally in other keys) nevertheless had C/G pitches stamped on the reed shoes - the tongues just aren't filed they way they would be for drastic changes in pitch.

 

Ken

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Here's a link to the a search result something like what Jim described: https://www.google.com/search?q=%22baritone+anglo%22+site%3Aconcertina.net .

 

I am interested in a baritone anglo. Does anybody own one? I would like to see the inside and get an idea of the dimensions??? What keys do they come in? Who made them??

 

Robert, I recommend you search for old threads here on concertina.net. (I use Google's "Advanced Search", which is far more reliable than the built-in search here.) I just did a search, restricted to the domain "concertina.net" for the phrase "baritone anglo", and it turned up 86 results. Several of those were in the "Buy and Sell" section. I didn't look through them all, but makers' names I noticed included Lachenal, Wheatstone, Dipper, Geuns-Wakker, and Tedrow.

 

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I have a 20 key Lachenal baritone No 113824 which I thought that I would use more for song accompaniment than I do. It measures 7 1/4 inches across the flats but has some very long reeds.

 

Other baritones I have seen (30 key Dippers) are smaller - probably 6 1/2 inches.

 

The reason for not using it more is that it sounds in more or less the same register as me and so occupies the same space in the spectrum and I often prefer to use my standard treble (32 key Wheatstone rosewood Linota) which stands out more. Frequently I am undecided!

 

I have attached a short sample file with the baritone used first and then the treble so that you can make the comparison.

 

David

 

Fakenham Fair Baritone & Treble comp.mp3

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I am acquainted with a brilliant Wheatstone C/G Linota baritone, serial number 30,000 or so. If you send me your email address I can send you pictures of the inside. The pictures all have a ruler in shot so you will get all of the dimensions you might want. The pictures are not small files so if you can do Dropbox it would be easier.

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A friend of mine back in the USA bought a Tedrow Baritone C/G and received it last spring. He is delighted with it, and does use it to accompany singing. I had a chance to try it out only briefly last time I visited, but I liked it very much. I usually play more toward the low end (left hand) anyway because I prefer the sound there. With the baritone that puts the melody very low indeed, and so I would use it to work the melody back into the right hand like most everyone else apparently does with the standard box, and save the bass notes for chords.

 

I saw a used Tedrow baritone listed for sale over here on the site for the Music Room in Cleckheaton last autumn, but I hesitated a couple days while I considered the money involved, and by the time I decided to go for it, it had already gone. :( I then phoned Bob Tedrow to see what his waiting list looked like, but at the time he wasn't taking orders because he felt the waiting list had become too long. :o

Edited by Tradewinds Ted
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I expect that we'll have some baritone anglos to offer in the coming weeks and months. A used, 30-key Dipper C/G (Jeffries layout, 7-1/2" raised rosewood ends, 8-fold bellows) is expected in the next few weeks, and our own R. Morse & Co. baritone anglo model will be available soon (??) in either C/G or D/A.

 

-- Doug

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I tried out the prototype of Doug's new baritone Button Box Anglo C/G at my Will Quale house concert event last month.

 

Will had just screwed it together and was very proud to show it off. It's an octave below the standard C/G. I couldn't keep my hands off of this beauty, as it played so nicely. The sound was excellent and I thought it was an exceptionable player. I look forward to this low growler being in production. It seemed to excel at accompaniment for singing but could also play tunes in the upper reaches just fine and up to speed. Though large, it was light and loud as you would expect from the Button Box line.

Edited by Jody Kruskal
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Well I can't vouch for hybrid baritone anglos since I have never handled one, but Anne's Morse English baritone has a tone rather closer to true concertina reeds than my Morse anglo. I would be in the market for hybrid bass anglo (one octave below G/D) but I suspect that might be impossible.

 

Chris

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I would be in the market for hybrid bass anglo (one octave below G/D) but I suspect that might be impossible.

 

Not a hybrid (of course!) but did you know Colin has made at least one in that tuning? Cormac Begley got to play it, and was raving about it.

 

 

Indeed I have. In fact I've met a couple and like all C&R's work they were both things of great beauty. But I only have one lifetime to live.

 

Chris

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