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Jim Besser

Theme Of The Month, February 2014: French Waltzes And Mazurkas

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Here is a first video attempt with my phone. Not enough remaining memory, the tune is cut before the end... It is a tune by Gus Viseur "Flambée Montalbanaise". Played here with my Dipper baritone duet.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=koxBvHtAWOk

Edited by tona

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Great one Thomas! And it's nice to finally see you playing. I must say, that your playing is the best example of what duets are capable of in hands of a skilled player!

 

Side note: I knew that you're playing Dipper custom, but I did'n knew that it has asymetric ends. Is the bass side thicker because it has two reedpans in two layers?

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Hi!

You are right for the multiple reedpan of the lefthand. It is because of the big low reeds...

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not really... but if Yann Tiersen is shortly the theme of a totm, why not?... ;)

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Here's my first contribution to theme of the month. It's a lovely French mazurka written by Maxou Heintzen, entitled L'inconnu de Limoise. A rough.melody only version, in the first instance.

 

http://soundcloud.com/aeolaman/linconnu-de-limoise

 

 

Chris

 

Edited to correct my mis-spelling of the composer's surname.

Edited by Chris Drinkwater

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Here's my first contribution to theme of the month. It's a lovely French mazurka written by Maxou Heitzen, entitled L'inconnu de Limoise. A rough.melody only version, in the first instance.

 

http://soundcloud.com/aeolaman/linconnu-de-limoise

 

 

Chris

Here's an ABC of one version of the tune along with a little note about the story apparently associated with it, and theo words. I don't have a translation of the words..

 

X:42
T:L'Inconnue de Limoise
C:Maxou (J.F.) Heintzen
M:3/4
K:G
D/ G>A|:B2-B>G c>B|B2-B>B c>d|c2-c>B A>G|D2-D>D G>A|
B2-B>G c>B|B2-B>B c>d|c2-c>B A>G|1A2-A>D G>A:|2A2-A>B c>d||
B/ c>d|:e2g>f e>f|d2-d>c B>A|G>F G>A B>G|D2 G2F2|
E2-E>F G>A|G2F2E2|F2-F>E F>G|1A2-A>B c>d:|2F2-F>G A>B|G2-G3/|]
W:
W:The name (The Stranger From Limoise) has a story behind it, as you might guess.
W: When they were doing some roadworks, or demolition, or moving a graveyard,
W: or something like that in Limoise they came across a grave containing both a skeleton
W: and the remains of a set of pipes. The grave was un-named, so the identity of the piper
W: was unknown, but the story caught the imagination of the French folk world and
W: M Heintzen penned the tune in the piper's honour. Words reflect on the pipes and their meaning
W: to the dead man.
W:

Il doit dotmia depuis tout ce temps

Rieû Bentimeû|, soûs trois pieds de tene V'là qu'on le déranse, impoliment

Quelle dûle d'idee, dchaneet d'cimetière Dcllans M tomhc. tout.ontre sa tê12

O a trcuvé son seul bagaqe

Sa cornem se, sû chère musette

Qui acîompaenë son srand vqraqe

Car on na pas pu les sépater

Et c'est peul-êtrc beaucoup nieu-\ ainsi

On les a trouvés, ik dorment dans le ûême lil

C'étai.t peut ètte pas uû maîlre-sonneur

Mais il ainait ce sacré bout de bois

Un peu comme une soeur que l'on vut gaftler pès de soi.

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Thanks for that, Chuck. It, indeed. was composed in honour of an unknown piper whose remains (including pipes) were unearthed unexpectedly during some excavations for construction work, so the story goes. I have since found out that this was the tune of the month in November 2009 on Melodeon.net, Knowing the story behind the origin of the tune, I was planning to put it up along with the ABC, in case anyone else wants to learn this delightful tune but you beat me to it! :)

 

Chris.

 

,

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Thanks for that, Chuck. It, indeed. was composed in honour of an unknown piper whose remains (including pipes) were unearthed unexpectedly during some excavations for construction work, so the story goes. I have since found out that this was the tune of the month in November 2009 on Melodeon.net, Knowing the story behind the origin of the tune, I was planning to put it up along with the ABC, in case anyone else wants to learn this delightful tune but you beat me to it! :)

 

Chris.

 

,

My pleasure Chris. It is always good to know someone appreciated what you did.

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Thanks for that, Chuck. It, indeed. was composed in honour of an unknown piper whose remains (including pipes) were unearthed unexpectedly during some excavations for construction work, so the story goes. I have since found out that this was the tune of the month in November 2009 on Melodeon.net, Knowing the story behind the origin of the tune, I was planning to put it up along with the ABC, in case anyone else wants to learn this delightful tune but you beat me to it! :)

 

Chris.

 

,

I've loved this tune for many years but hadn't heard the story of its naming until now - so here's another bit of appreciation for your efforts Chuck!

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Here is an other video attempt with "mazurka de lanternaire" which is a traditional tune from Auvergne (France). I like this very simple tune with a minor part A and a major part B.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bv456mCCFkg

 

But sound from mic of my Ipad is not very good and I can't resist to make a recording with my couple of studio mics.

 

https://soundcloud.com/thoon-1/mazurka-de-lanternaire

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