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Antique Jeffries Concertina For Sale


martin8107
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Trying Chris' method #1 playing the note a few times pushing, then playing same note by pushing then

immediately pulling out the sound is definitely different, especially noticeable on left side buttons.

 

Trying Chris' method #2 playing the lowest note on left hand side pulling in and out

I can definitely here the difference of the sound one way is a higher pitch than the other way.

 

I wonder if the difference can be heard over a phone.

 

Thanks, Mike

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I was not refering to a 62 button Jeffries Duett, but a 44/45 button instrument of the 6"/6.25" size. The one that I saw on eBay, I am fairly certain was the same instrument that I had spotted on Chris's stall at Sidmouth about 6 months earlier.

Note that Gavin Atkin has been superbly playing a Jeffries Duet of this size for many years.

Inventor.

 

Inventor,

My apology.

To clarify, (and for future reference) the one I referenced sold on eBay on 3rd Sept 2012 for £1800.

Be Well,

Dan

Edited by danersen
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I Just got off the phone with Greg Jowaisas,

He was very helpful.

My concertina is a Anglo.

By listening to concertina over phone Greg thinks the key is B flat.

Mike

Outstanding!

Congratulations.

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Hi, just clarifying.... is this a Bb/ F? (for all the Irish lads that would call an Ab/Eb a Bb concertina)

 

They would? First I've heard of that.

 

Then do they call a C/G a "D concertina"?

And what if it's only a 20-button? :unsure:

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Yep, We'd call a C/g our 'd' concertina, a Csharp/Gsharp an 'Eb' concertina and a Bb/F a 'C' concertina etc. suppose its the association with other instruments (a 'D' flute/tin whistle etc.) the main key we're playing in.

An for 20 button, I have never come across a 20 button in a session/ concert here ever. Maybe it would be a new trend to start though. :)

Edited by ofearghail7
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Hi, just clarifying.... is this a Bb/ F? (for all the Irish lads that would call an Ab/Eb a Bb concertina)

 

They would? First I've heard of that.

 

Then do they call a C/G a "D concertina"?

And what if it's only a 20-button? :unsure:

 

Maybe Ofearghail7 meant " those Irish lads that do call" ... so not all do.... but as a Bb/F would be used to play a tone flat of the normal Concert Keys of D and G ( normally called playing in D).. then some would call this a C concertina ( as in " we are having a C session")...

 

Likewise an A/E anglo would be a B concertina and the Ab/Eb would be a Bb instrument. This all relates to the flute, whistle and¨Pipes keys.

 

This is all due to the modern cross-row style of playing which is hardly possible on a two row C/G.

(cross posted with Ofeargail7) :)

Edited by Geoff Wooff
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Maybe Ofearghail7 meant " those Irish lads that do call" ... so not all do.... but as a Bb/F would be used to play a tone flat of the normal Concert Keys of D and G ( normally called playing in D).. then some would call this a C concertina ( as in " we are having a C session")...

 

Likewise an A/E anglo would be a B concertina and the Ab/Eb would be a Bb instrument. This all relates to the flute, whistle and¨Pipes keys.

Ah, the wonders of the human mind! B)

 

This is all due to the modern cross-row style of playing which is hardly possible on a two row C/G.

Yet the 2-row was once a strong tradition, no? How soon the memory fades.

 

Meanwhile, it seems to me that in this "adjusted" (my characterization) terminology, a 2-row G/D anglo, played in a normal "D" session, should be termed a concertina "in A", which clearly it ain't. :ph34r:

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Maybe Ofearghail7 meant " those Irish lads that do call" ... so not all do.... but as a Bb/F would be used to play a tone flat of the normal Concert Keys of D and G ( normally called playing in D).. then some would call this a C concertina ( as in " we are having a C session")...

 

Likewise an A/E anglo would be a B concertina and the Ab/Eb would be a Bb instrument. This all relates to the flute, whistle and¨Pipes keys.

Ah, the wonders of the human mind! B)

 

This is all due to the modern cross-row style of playing which is hardly possible on a two row C/G.

Yet the 2-row was once a strong tradition, no? How soon the memory fades.

 

Meanwhile, it seems to me that in this "adjusted" (my characterization) terminology, a 2-row G/D anglo, played in a normal "D" session, should be termed a concertina "in A", which clearly it ain't. :ph34r:

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People who take their Bf/F to a C session, their C#/G# To a Eb session or their G/D to an A session (never actually heard of an A session) do not learn a new fingering, they ignore the actual note values and pretend to play a C/G. Consequently when they play in D on a G/D it comes out in A.

 

I suspect when the two row had its day people more commonly played in C (actual C, not as in the para above) and along the rows.

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Mike,

 

All the above chaps are being jolly helpful. I'm with Danersen however in suspecting this would have been a slightly limited instrument as a duet. One of the best Jeffries duettists I ever knew was a chap called Chris Beale when he and I both danced with Chingford Morris in the seventies. He owned two machines - each with 88 keys if I remember right - and was a brilliant player of just about anything from folk to ragtime to classical pieces.

 

I don't for a moment doubt those who say these were occasionally adapted from duet to anglo but I have two such boxes - each with 46 keys and, so far as I can tell, neither has been altered in this fashion so I can only conclude they were both Anglos from birth as it were. When I first got the G-D 46key (whose history is listed elsewhere on this site) It was fairly knackered so I took it in about 1972 to Dave and Neville Crabbe in Islington Road. They told me it was an anglo and always had been and I've never had cause to doubt it.

 

Now, old man Jeffries was a chap with an eye to the main chance so who's to say he didn't come up with a catch-all design whereby one layout could be sold as either system?

 

If yours is an anglo, it's certainly worth a good deal more than a duet of this size would be. That's because they are so versatile. You can still play with all the usual anglo punch for the Morris but the entended keyboard allows far greater opportunity for legato playing, with wider chord variety and extra flexibility in bass runs, making the instruments great for song accompaniment. At some point I shall be selling one myself as I don't really use the C-G 46key as much as I ought or thought I would.

 

Don't sell before you know exactly what you have and, if sell you must, try to ensure it goes to someone who can and will play. There are too many collectors out there who can't and don't play and there are too many good players out there waiting for an instrument such as this, who never get their hands on one.

 

Good luck!

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