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Jim Besser

Tune Of The Month For July 2013: Roslyn Castle

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These may not be on anyone's "favorites" list of ITM (and indeed at least one is probably English in origin), But they are tunes I like well enough to recommend:

 

Random (Random Notes or Random Jig too all same tune)

Frieze Britches (Freeze Breeches and other variants of the name)

The Big Reel of Ballynacally (sp?)

The Dances at Kinvara (Barn Dance)

The Woods of Old Limerick

Padraig O'Keefe's Slide (The first tune in Sharon Shannon's Blackbird set...not O'Keefe's Slide)

 

I suppose one should mention Concertina Reel, but frankly I think it is a bit of a bore.

 

I'm an EC player, so Anglo Players may have quite a different list...

 

abcs available if needed.

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Common session tunes might be a possiblity. But the hard core ITM folks might find them too common.

Here one small list;

Kid on the Mountain
Out in the Ocean
Connaughtman’s Rambles
Tripping Up the Stairs
Kesh Jig
Cooley’s Reel
Silver Spear
Old Copperplate
The Sally Gardens
Mountain Road
Lilting Banshee
Inisheer
Si Bheag Si Mhor
Blarney Pilgrim

From The Session http://thesession.org/discussions/25239

 

I can play many on a whistle but my concertina fu is far behind.

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While recording summertime I got out the tiddler and did this because it's one I play anyway.roslyn 50K.mp3

 

That's what I do with it, nothing earth shaking... and I must keep off those low bass notes a bit more.

 

This is the 53 key Weatstone duet.

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While recording summertime I got out the tiddler and did this because it's one I play anyway.attachicon.gifroslyn 50K.mp3

 

That's what I do with it, nothing earth shaking... and I must keep off those low bass notes a bit more.

 

This is the 53 key Weatstone duet.

 

There is definately too much Left hand in the recording mix.. How have you placed the microphone? Could it sound better with the mic set to favour the Right side ?

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While recording summertime I got out the tiddler and did this because it's one I play anyway.attachicon.gifroslyn 50K.mp3

 

That's what I do with it, nothing earth shaking... and I must keep off those low bass notes a bit more.

 

This is the 53 key Weatstone duet.

 

There is definately too much Left hand in the recording mix.. How have you placed the microphone? Could it sound better with the mic set to favour the Right side ?

 

Yes I did forget to do that; just slapped it on the coffee table in front of me.

Edited by Dirge

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<never mind, i can take a hint...>

Edited by Ruediger R. Asche

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Stefan, your example of "tremolo" reminded me of this great song: American Wheeze by 16 Horsepower - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THlgU-8dMYg . I was able to replicate this effect on an anglo, but never came anywhere close on a duet. Thank you for showing me, that this can be done to such extent. Very inspiring!

 

[side note: I've been quiet this month, just lurking and listening only, as I'm still working on my version - not much time on my hands this month. And counter melody playing proved to be a bit of a challenge for me, but hopefully I'll post my version before the end of the month :)]

Great performance! Yes, that´s what I meant. I wonder why accordion players (or similar instruments) don´t use it more often. It adds nicely to the rythm and turns the instrument into a kind of comping keyboard.

 

Here is an amazing accordian player using the "bellows reverse" technique:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i0QQIf2-sqQ

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He's really quite wonderful, but somehow all I can think of is "Lady of Spain>" :blink:

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