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Thumb Straps - Make Them Swivel For Easy Playing (See Video Link)


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To make my Tenor Stagi concertina much easier to play, today I did a thumb strap modification - mounting the thumb strap on one screw, not three - so the strap now swivels comfortably when my hand twists up or down to reach the far notes.

 

I'm loading the video onto YouTube - it will be at...

 

 

Bruce (Tomo) Thomson20

Lyndhurst St. Chelwood Village,

Palmerston North06 357 7773

021 176 9711 palmytomo@gmail.com

 

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Yes, well... whilst I see your point Tomo and not disputing that it could be a good idea.. I have to point out that thumbs have three joints and thus it should be possible to articulate to a comfortable position within a reasonable arc of playability.

 

The English Concertina has been around for something like 170 years .. perhaps this idea has been tried before.... but I think that most players would prefer a fixed anchorage especially when employing all four fingers to play the keyboard or when standing up.

 

Also I would suggest it could be dangerous, on a vintage instrument, to just remove the extra two screws and expect the long screw to take all the force that can be applied during spirited playing. :o

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  • 3 weeks later...

Now, having had the pleasure of being in the company of Simon Thoumire for a few days about a month ago, I find that idea interesting. His thumbstraps seems permanently twisted about 45 degrees, since he plays about 45 degrees ACROSS the rows (instead of up & down), hence the twist. My guess is that with this change you find the low notes easier to reach?

 

I don't use thumb straps at all, but that is another story ;-)

 

/Henrik

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But - I forgot to add - I can only agree with Geoff about the dangers of doing this on a vintage instrument:

 

"Don't do this at home, kids" - unless it's on something modern and cheap! I had, at some point, a damaged Edephone with ebony ends. The damage was a major rip-out of the (too thin, IMHO) ebony fretwork, on both sides, because a screw or screws had loosened some time in its history...crack, crack!

 

/Henrik

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