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Tune Of The Month For March, 2013: The Fiery Clockface


Jim Besser
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I haven't been here since 2009 but was prompted to visit by the mention of this thread on melodeon.net.

 

So here's Fiery Clockface in D on an Andrew Norman Anglo, just single notes.

 

I then started to look at playing it in G and whilst playing about, it came out as a polka. I played the A music on the right hand side but then played the B music an octave lower than normal. Then I thought I could also play this in G on my Wheatstone C/G just the same as the version in D on the Norman. The A music will be in the same pitch as the Norman but the B music will be an octave higher. And then why not on my Lachenal baritone in C/G so the A music is an octave lower and the B music at the same pitch as the Norman. Adding them all together this is how it came out.

 

Regards
Howard Mitchell
Edited by Howard Mitchell
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Just so I get this done before April...

 

Here's a recording. Could be better and maybe I will redo it later.

 

Is played on the Albion. I will try to add The Geordie later.

 

The Fiery Clockface

 

If that won't open:

https://www.box.com/shared/21bjvdi539lamcfamc4s

 

LATER:

 

Okay here's the file for the same tune but on the Geordie baritone:

https://www.box.com/shared/x20qcixw74kt1bsfbq9u

 

I should mention That my recording standards and equipment are probably quite atrocious. I use a simple digital voice recorder, then the results go through uploads and downloads and various edits and whatever.

 

Here's the ABC code With my own counterpoint added:

 

X: 1

T:The Fiery Clockface

M:6/8

L:1/8

N:As played by Wendy Stanford

K:D

[F2d2][Fd] D2E|F2G A2B|[G2=c2][Gc] E2F|G2A B2c| [F2d2][Fd] D2E|F2G A3|

Bcd edc|d3 [F3A3d3]:||:[A2f2][Af] def|[b2g2][Af] [G2e2][Fd]|[E2c2]B A2B|[E2c2]d [G3e3]|

[A2f2][Af] def|[b2g2][Af] [G2e2][Fd]|[E2c2]a gfe|d3[F3A3d3]:|

Edited by bellowbelle
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I haven't been here since 2009 but was prompted to visit by the mention of this thread on melodeon.net.

 

So here's Fiery Clockface in D on an Andrew Norman Anglo, just single notes.

 

I then started to look at playing it in G and whilst playing about, it came out as a polka. I played the A music on the right hand side but then played the B music an octave lower than normal. Then I though I could also play this in G on my Wheatstone C/G just the same as the version in D on the Norman. The A music will be in the same pitch as the Norman but the B music will be an octave higher. And then why not on my Lachenal baritone in C/G so the A music is an octave lower and the B music at the same pitch as the Norman. Adding them all together this is how it came out.

 

Regards
Howard Mitchell

 

I totally love it!

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Here is the same tune but on the Geordie baritone ( my previous one was done on the Albion treble).

 

 

https://www.box.com/shared/x20qcixw74kt1bsfbq9u

 

I've also added this to my previous post.

 

My recording methods are primitive so I'm probably not the best source for the ultimate audio

 

cool! I particularly like the accentuation in the accompaniment! Did you come up with that yourself, or is that sort of standard practice?

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I haven't been here since 2009 but was prompted to visit by the mention of this thread on melodeon.net.

 

So here's Fiery Clockface in D on an Andrew Norman Anglo, just single notes.

 

I then started to look at playing it in G and whilst playing about, it came out as a polka. I played the A music on the right hand side but then played the B music an octave lower than normal. Then I though I could also play this in G on my Wheatstone C/G just the same as the version in D on the Norman. The A music will be in the same pitch as the Norman but the B music will be an octave higher. And then why not on my Lachenal baritone in C/G so the A music is an octave lower and the B music at the same pitch as the Norman. Adding them all together this is how it came out.

 

Regards
Howard Mitchell

 

I totally love it!

I particularly like the passing F natural in the B section (of the D version, Bb in the G version). Actually, I guess my old theory professor would insist on calling them E# and A# in this context.

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Here is the same tune but on the Geordie baritone ( my previous one was done on the Albion treble).

 

 

https://www.box.com/shared/x20qcixw74kt1bsfbq9u

 

I've also added this to my previous post.

 

My recording methods are primitive so I'm probably not the best source for the ultimate audio

 

cool! I particularly like the accentuation in the accompaniment! Did you come up with that yourself, or is that sort of standard practice?

 

Thanks, Ruediger! I enjoyed your rendition, the medley with the polka added, too... and speaking of polkas, yes, I really liked Howard's version as well.

 

Well, I don't even know if the accentuation I used is 'standard' with anyone, really. I am quite unused to playing traditional tunes of any kind, at all, outside of all the childhood church songs I learned (and THAT'S a large archive!).

 

This time, I decided to learn the basic tune, then let my fingers pick out what harmony they felt like adding, but especially including those... m6's... minor sixths (I hope I'm not wrong and it's actually M6's, major sixths. Anyway -- the sixth intervals).

 

I seem to have one way to play, and that's how I'm going to do it!

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This time, I decided to learn the basic tune, then let my fingers pick out what harmony they felt like adding, but especially including those... m6's... minor sixths (I hope I'm not wrong and it's actually M6's, major sixths. Anyway -- the sixth intervals).

Minor 6ths, they are, at the beginning of the tune, but the neat thing about 3rds and 6ths is that as long as you stay within the key signature, harmony lines will contain both, and that's what happens in the B section where you play the melody and a harmony line a 6th below it, going back and forth between major and minor as the key signature requires.

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I particularly like the passing F natural in the B section (of the D version, Bb in the G version). Actually, I guess my old theory professor would insist on calling them E# and A# in this context.

 

 

I've always known the tune with that passing note. I had to look back in my tune library to where I first had it and it's in the tune book for a band called North and South that we had in about 1970-74. It's hand written in G with the note as a A#. I guess your prof was right.

 

Howard

Edited by Howard Mitchell
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I was game to have a go at this but I looked at the suggested music, thought "If that's a 'cracking good jig' you can spare me a dull one" and decided to leave it for others.

 

Then I put my back out (weilding a bog brush of all things). Punishment for such a cavalier attitude to a fine tune? You decide. Anyway I spent the day lying flat on the bed with only the 46 key for company and learnt it almost despite myself. A few days later I am bored with it again and this is the best you'll get from me.fierycrock.mp3

 

Enjoy if you will: The off tune and dischordant reeds. The high note that doesn't shut off immediately when requested. The general effect of teetering on the edge of chaos as I try and play it fast enough to be interesting yet faster than either I or the instrument really want to go. Note particularly the strange arrangement second time round. I don't know where that came from but I thought it was better than the standard oompah stuff. On the other hand I'm rather proud of using the dischordant reed for the trumpet effect at the end; that was deliberate.

 

So for the record this is a rather beaten up (at the moment) brass reeded 46 key Lachenal Maccan with a low D in the G sharp slot.

 

Ok someone else's turn.

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So for the record this is a rather beaten up (at the moment) brass reeded 46 key Lachenal Maccan with a low D in the G sharp slot.

 

 

 

Sure it wasn't a barrel organ or a player piano?

 

Sounds quite different that way, I like the approach. Now all the best for a speedy recovery. When it's YOUR turn to pick a TOTM, it'll be my turn to bail out (but certainly not on grounds of the tune being too uninteresting or too easy... ;-)) Thanks for taking a turn (no, I won't extend the thanks to the bog brush though it's tempting); it's very enlightening to see (hear) just how far a simple tune can be taken by a competent player!

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Note for those non 'English' english readers.. a' Bog Brush' is a tool used for cleaning a Toilet (water closet)... the mind boggles Dirge ! :wacko:

 

On a brighter note I spent four hours yesterday trying to play this piece in D on my Maccann Duet.. perhaps I will not succeed in making a good enough performance of it before the end of March but at least it really got me working and I learnt quite a lot too. After all that is the real purpose of this Tune of The Month forum surely ?

 

Happy St;Patricks day to all,

Geoff.

Edited by Geoff Wooff
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Minor 6ths, they are, at the beginning of the tune, but the neat thing about 3rds and 6ths is that as long as you stay within the key signature, harmony lines will contain both, and that's what happens in the B section where you play the melody and a harmony line a 6th below it, going back and forth between major and minor as the key signature requires.

 

Aha, yes... and thanks for stating this, Dave, because although I "sort of" knew this, the logic of it hadn't really sunk in. Now it has! :)

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Thanks to all for the contributions so far! I find this initiative really stimulating, although I'm not yet ready to submit an entry of my own. However, here is some interesting background information on the 'Fiery Clock Fyece':

 

Robert (Bobby) Nunn 1808 - 1853

Bobby was a slater by trade but lost his sight following a fall from a roof. Thereafter he used his abilities as a musician to earn a living. He played the fiddle, sang and wrote songs. He was a regular at pubs, clubs around Tyneside. Apparently many songs were rather coarse, full of innuendo - much to the delight of audiences (men and women) with the benefit of a few drinks inside them. His songs include The Pitman and the Blackin, The Newcastle Lad, Drucken Bella Roy ’O and a classic - the surreal Fiery Clock Fyece, a tale of an illusion caused by drink whilst passing St Nicholas Cathedral.

(from http://www.rolyveitch.20m.com/dialect_songwriters.html)

 

I'm not sure whether this means that Nunn wrote the lyrics only or both lyrics and melody, but his was the title by which the melody became known.

 

And a version of this song by Dennis Weatherly:

 

https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/5yJXGU8b7EE?rel=0

 

The accompanying pianist and Jim Besser here on this forum seem to have had a similar idea about the intro.

Cheers,

Mark

Thanks for this info and the links!

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Here I go, my take on the Fiery Clock Face, my first ever recording in cyberspace...

It's not yet perfect, but it'll have to do. Played in G on a Wheatstone 30k C/G, recorded with a zoom H-2.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/4496965/Fiery-Clockface-in-G-MarkvN-Wheatstone30k-CG.mp3

 

Good use of the basses to get a bouncy lift. Like it in G!

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