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Not An Anglo?


griffinga
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The 39s are a bit too stripped, I think. A step too far. I wonder if Messrs Lachenal were aiming at players who were mainly interested in playing single line tunes when they produced the 39?

 

Why on earth would someone "mainly interested in playing single line tunes" buy a duet concertina?

David, you have sliced through the fustian gloom of this discussion to strike the true heart. How could anyone possibly suggest play single notes on a tiny concertina when it is clearly labeled a 'duet'? How indeed?

 

Ah, but by that sort of "logic", one should never play more than two notes at a time, no? :ph34r: :D

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The 39s are a bit too stripped, I think. A step too far. I wonder if Messrs Lachenal were aiming at players who were mainly interested in playing single line tunes when they produced the 39?

 

Why on earth would someone "mainly interested in playing single line tunes" buy a duet concertina?

 

 

 

Why not? It has a number of advantages over an EC or an anglo and the Maccann goes a good way to having the best of both.

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I couldn’t possibly agree with you Ivan. The “white keys” as you call them are identical on the 39 key as are on the 46 key with the exception that the high notes E,F and G in the right hand of the 39 key are missing.

 

 

The 39 key plays very well in the keys of G and D, so if you are into Irish music and are not happy with the anglo then this could be the instrument for you.

 

You can verify from the pics of the concertina for sale that it has no low E in the LH. To make it easy, the names of the notes are on the heads of the keys, the LH end is shown in pic no 12 (only). Diagrams of 39-key Maccann key layouts in Maccan's own New Instruction Method and Gaskins chording book on concertina.com show no E, though Gaskins' wording gives some indication that this may not apply to every specific instrument. Every 46-key I have seen has this E, and it is shown in the diagrams in the same books mentioned above, though I think some early models may lack it.

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The 39s are a bit too stripped, I think. A step too far. I wonder if Messrs Lachenal were aiming at players who were mainly interested in playing single line tunes when they produced the 39?

 

Why on earth would someone "mainly interested in playing single line tunes" buy a duet concertina?

 

To get a good deal on a vintage concertina, perhaps?

 

 

Well, this may fit for today's market, but hardly for "Messrs Lachenal" back then, I'd guess.... B)

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post-392-0-94074000-1360012541_thumb.pngpost-392-0-63305100-1360012583_thumb.png

 

I couldn’t possibly agree with you Ivan. The “white keys” as you call them are identical on the 39 key as are on the 46 key with the exception that the high notes E,F and G in the right hand of the 39 key are missing.


The 39 key plays very well in the keys of G and D, so if you are into Irish music and are not happy with the anglo then this could be the instrument for you.

 

You can verify from the pics of the concertina for sale that it has no low E in the LH. To make it easy, the names of the notes are on the heads of the keys, the LH end is shown in pic no 12 (only). Diagrams of 39-key Maccann key layouts in Maccan's own New Instruction Method and Gaskins chording book on concertina.com show no E, though Gaskins' wording gives some indication that this may not apply to every specific instrument. Every 46-key I have seen has this E, and it is shown in the diagrams in the same books mentioned above, though I think some early models may lack it.

Yes Ivan, I think you are right. The attachments are not very good but you can probably see there is no low E in either the 39 or 47 Key.

 

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attachicon.gif47 key.pngattachicon.gif39 key.png

 

I couldn’t possibly agree with you Ivan. The “white keys” as you call them are identical on the 39 key as are on the 46 key with the exception that the high notes E,F and G in the right hand of the 39 key are missing.

 

 

The 39 key plays very well in the keys of G and D, so if you are into Irish music and are not happy with the anglo then this could be the instrument for you.

 

You can verify from the pics of the concertina for sale that it has no low E in the LH. To make it easy, the names of the notes are on the heads of the keys, the LH end is shown in pic no 12 (only). Diagrams of 39-key Maccann key layouts in Maccan's own New Instruction Method and Gaskins chording book on concertina.com show no E, though Gaskins' wording gives some indication that this may not apply to every specific instrument. Every 46-key I have seen has this E, and it is shown in the diagrams in the same books mentioned above, though I think some early models may lack it.

Yes Ivan, I think you are right. The attachments are not very good but you can probably see there is no low E in either the 39 or 47 Key.

My Lach' 46 (which I think is pretty standard) is slightly different to your pic. On the LH the low E is there but no high Bb or C#. I wouldn't normally expect to get the sharp on the top note of a LH keyboard anyway; they didn't seem to do that. I think this all points to the diagram being a very early one.

 

I had my G# slot fitted with a low D so I have a continuous natural scale up from the low C. I'd recommend that one, Tony.

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