Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Henrik Müller

(Being) born again -

Recommended Posts

Hi, all -

 

For a couple of years I've been fascinated by the reed pan routing machine

that can be seen in the short, historic film about the Wheatstone factory, on

the British Pathe site.

 

In all likelihood a machine made for Wheatstone by Louis Lachenal - at least

the large sums paid to "Mr. Lachenal" in the "Payments" books 1845, 1846,

1848, 1849: approx. £1670, indicates that he made something "big" for Sir

Charles.

 

So the last six months I've been hammering away on what hopefully will be a

modern version of the machine. Today it took its first step, not altogether a great

success, but a proof of the concept:

 

post-448-0-71088100-1355949555_thumb.jpg

 

No - I will not use plywood! It's only a test to see if the concept works, and it does,

though order is wrong:

 

The machine should perform three operations:

  • Rout the tapered, dovetailed tracks for the reeds
  • Rout the long tracks for the walls
  • Rout the air holes

The order should be walls, reeds, air, because when the walls are mounted,

they are used a guide or reference for routing the reed tracks. When they are

done on both sides, the air holes are done. At least that's the idea.

 

Today, on the kitchen table (it's built upstairs, but demoed in the kitchen), it looks

like this:

 

post-448-0-42984400-1355950052_thumb.jpg

The handle is missing - what handle?

A handle on the left hand side that can push the router table to the right.

A proof-of-concept has been done (out of wood...), worked fine.

 

The center piece - a 28 mm diam piece upon which the reed pan is lowered.

The top clamp - a large (as large as possible), round piece that goes on top

of the reed pan

The top screw - not a screw, more like a fat, knurled thumb screw that screws

on to M5 shaft you can see sticking up.

 

The more intricate part is here:

 

post-448-0-33111700-1355950156_thumb.jpg

 

Router arm in the center, with the guide pin sticking up. This pin is runs into a straight

track, routed in a 4mm plate below the table. The plate can turn around the center of the

track's end circle - which is also the center of the router bit.

 

Hang on - but it looks like the router bit is not in center with the pin?!

 

Right, it isn't: the guide pin is attached a part of the arm that can be offset. In clear

language it means that the track will be routed, say, 4 mm to the left of the wall track

- because otherwise it would rout into the wall.

 

Anyway - the outcome of today's exercise is that the intricate looking thingies in the left

side of the table need to go and be replaced by something more stable and sturdy.

 

It will take a while - the owner of the workshop I use is in Spain, will be back March 1st.

 

Merry Christmas to all!

 

/Henrik

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve Dickenson still has and uses the original machine.

Wouldn't a Computer controlled Routing machine be the best option ? I believe that is what Wim Wakker uses.

I have seen Chinese made small computer controlled routing machines for sale on eBay for as little as £500; I have no idea if they are any good.

Inventor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to see the progress after the shots you showed us on your smartphone at Bradfield in Summer, great work.

 

Happy Christmas from Sunny Sheffield !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve Dickenson still has and uses the original machine.

Wouldn't a Computer controlled Routing machine be the best option ? I believe that is what Wim Wakker uses.

I have seen Chinese made small computer controlled routing machines for sale on eBay for as little as £500; I have no idea if they are any good.

Inventor.

Yes, Steve DIckinson has a machine, maybe the one we can see in the Pathe film.

 

I know that "Use CNC..." is the fast-draw answer today, but I find a certain logic and beauty

in using machines which are built to perform one or a few operations very quickly and without

any heavy intellectual requirements for use.

 

It isn't only a question of acquiring a machine, it also means having the room for it, buying

a Windows/Linux computer to run it, buy the program, learn the program, buy router bits, etc.

To me, that is endless - making my own is not.

 

Though two days ago I thought it might be ;-) because I suddenly realised that my offsetting

scheme (the moveable arm with the guide oin, on top of the router arm) is based on wrong

thinking. Grrr!

 

Luckily, I know what to do to fix it - but we'll have to wait till March to see it done!

 

In the meantime I'll continue the Christmas celebrations,

 

/Henrik

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...