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Who made this?


Marien
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This is a very old english concertina I bought in Wales last year.

The action has pivot posts, but unlike lachenal's the tops are rounded.

 

The fretwork is different from what I know.

Does anyone recognize the fretwork pattern?

 

post-1783-0-42200600-1352222790_thumb.jpg

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Do you think the ends are original to the concertina? They look a little heavy handed, possibly a simplification of floral motifs used on the likes of Jones concertinas e.g. http://www.concertinamuseum.com/CM00334b.htm Having read a number of accounts of people making and repairing concertinas, the cutting of elaborate end frets sounds like a very time consuming activity that would test the patience of a saint.

 

This is quite intriguing, any chance of a photo of the inside?

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Do you think the ends are original to the concertina? They look a little heavy handed, possibly a simplification of floral motifs used on the likes of Jones concertinas e.g. http://www.concertinamuseum.com/CM00334b.htm Having read a number of accounts of people making and repairing concertinas, the cutting of elaborate end frets sounds like a very time consuming activity that would test the patience of a saint.

 

This is quite intriguing, any chance of a photo of the inside?

 

I think that the ends are originals. I agree that this could be a Jones - i guess an early one. The ends are cut out of 1 solid layer of rosewood.

May also be a Nicholds.

 

This concertina is a real shipwreck, not for playing. (the other and came in 4 parts). I bought it on a flea market just for the complete set of brass reeds, and it has been taking a rest in the same plastic bag I got it... In fact, it is nearly complete and I am thinking about restoring it. But at this time most of the inside is on the outside. After a good clean I may find some more numbers, signs and texts on the reed pans or the baffles. Hoping to make more pictures later today.

Edited by marien
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I think that the ends are originals. I agree that this could be a Jones - i guess an early one. The ends are cut out of 1 solid layer of rosewood.

May also be a Nicholds.

 

Nicholds used a distinctive action post design which you can clearly see in the example in your link. Like a Lachenal with a slotted post, but unlike Lachenal has an opening in one side of the post.

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I think that the ends are originals. I agree that this could be a Jones - i guess an early one. The ends are cut out of 1 solid layer of rosewood.

May also be a Nicholds.

 

Nicholds used a distinctive action post design which you can clearly see in the example in your link. Like a Lachenal with a slotted post, but unlike Lachenal has an opening in one side of the post.

 

Thanks Theo,

 

I only looked at the fret work.

I overlooked the posts, and you are right. The posts are open on one side. The picture shows not only that it needs more than an average clean, but it also shows the posts. So it is a Nickolds...

 

post-1783-0-17440200-1352470361_thumb.jpg

 

Marien

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The picture shows not only that it needs more than an average clean...

post-1783-0-17440200-1352470361_thumb.jpg

Marien

That looks mighty unpleasant - please wear a face mask if you disturb any of that detritus.

You never know just what may be lurking in there.

Steve

Edited by SteveS
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The picture shows not only that it needs more than an average clean...

post-1783-0-17440200-1352470361_thumb.jpg

Marien

That looks mighty unpleasant - please wear a face mask if you disturb any of that detritus.

You never know just what may be lurking in there.

Steve

 

You bet, it may be very unpleasant to inhale or to touch these white micro monsters.

when I took it out of its plastic bag, I saw far too much of this prehistoric mold powder.

In stead of restoring I guess it is a better plan just save some parts, clean them in quarantaine and get rid of the rest....

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I don't think it's a Nickolds. I have seen this action in a couple of Chidley concertinas - one an Anglo and one an English - not top of the range though - see The Concertina museum

My link

 

 

My link

 

 

 

(think I've done the links ok)

chris

Edited by chris
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I don't think it's a Nickolds. I have seen this action in a couple of Chidley concertinas - one an Anglo and one an English - not top of the range though - see The Concertina museum

My link

 

 

My link

 

 

 

(think I've done the links ok)

chris

Thanks Chris,

It looks like it's an action of a Chidley concertina indeed.

In the meanwhile I removed some dirt and it has a serial number 2223 and there is an R stamped in the right side in the wood (one of the six pieces of the rim of the end plate or the action board).

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In stead of restoring I guess it is a better plan just save some parts, clean them in quarantaine and get rid of the rest....

 

That would be a rash decision until everything is clean and you can see what you are dealing with. A large part of that mess could be moth debris form moths consuming the felt from the pads. I see nothing in the photos so far that would not be restorable.

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In stead of restoring I guess it is a better plan just save some parts, clean them in quarantaine and get rid of the rest....

 

That would be a rash decision until everything is clean and you can see what you are dealing with. A large part of that mess could be moth debris form moths consuming the felt from the pads. I see nothing in the photos so far that would not be restorable.

 

There is some white powder, which could be funghi - not sure, and I am working slow to remove that on a safe way - not to damage anything, including my health...

 

I found the maker´s label, 80% plain white, and after a gentle rub it showed a part of the maker´s name text P.....LEY on top.

The P will be an incomplete R. Also parts of `LONDON`, the street name is unreadable. This indicates once more that it is a Rock Chidley.

 

Well, you may be right, not to be afraid of little moths and other insects. It would be a waste to throw away a historical concertina that´s maybe 150 to 170 years old. My impression is that parts have been made with a very high precision - all levers are in place and moving as they should (of course it is in need of new valves, pads and springs). The position of the buttons and the button holes in the fretwork - it's all constructed very precise. So I will take my time for cleaning first.

 

Thanks

Marien

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In stead of restoring I guess it is a better plan just save some parts, clean them in quarantaine and get rid of the rest....

That would be a rash decision until everything is clean and you can see what you are dealing with. A large part of that mess could be moth debris form moths consuming the felt from the pads. I see nothing in the photos so far that would not be restorable.

I agree with Theo - the 'tina appears complete enough to suggest that it can be restored.

Edited by SteveS
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