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du LIebe Augustin - why do I know this tune for summat else?


Kautilya
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What non-German songs is melody used for? Driving me crazy as it is so familiar but could it have been around so long?

Or maybe it is played regularly by our George hurdy gurdier and it has become part of the subsconscious

Ta.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGJIxLkPW04

 

Marx Augustin oder Der liebe Augustin (eigentlich Markus Augustin; * 1643 in Wien; † 11. März 1685

Die Große Pest von Wien war eine Pestepidemie, der 1679 in Wien vermutlich rund 12.000 Menschen zum Opfer fielen. Zeitgenössische Berichte bezifferten die Anzahl der Toten mit 70.000 bis 120.000. Schriftlich nachweisbar sind rund 8.000 Tote, was allerdings nur als Untergrenze betrachtet werden kann.

... Mit der Pest wurde auch der Straßenmusikant Augustin berühmt, mit dem das Lied Oh du lieber Augustin in Verbindung gebracht wird. (Wikipedia)

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It's the same as the children's song, "The More We Get Together" so maybe that's it?

 

 

The more we get together,

together, together,

the more we get together,

the happier we shall be.

For your friends

are my friends,

and my friends

are your friends.

The more we get together,

the happier we shall be.

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What non-German songs is melody used for? Driving me crazy as it is so familiar but could it have been around so long?

Or maybe it is played regularly by our George hurdy gurdier and it has become part of the subsconscious

Ta.

 

 

The start of the tune sounds very similar to 'The more we are (get) together the merrier we will be' smile.gif

 

Foxtrot version on

biggrin.gif

 

 

 

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It's the same as the children's song, "The More We Get Together" so maybe that's it?

 

biggrin.gif you beat me to it ...... I remember my Dad singing this song to us when my brothers and I were very small; he'd have us skipping round as we sang, hand in hand, in a circle smile.gif

Edited by anlej
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Did you ever see a lassie,

A lassie, a lassie

Did you ever see a lassie

Go this way and that?

 

Go this way and that way,

Go this way and that way

Did you ever see a lassie

Go this way and that?

 

Edited to add:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Did_You_Ever_See_a_Lassie%3F

Edited by David Barnert
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Righteeho!!!!

Now the trickier part - if the peasants were using the melody back in 17thC as they dropped like flies that must mean it has been around since then.

 

I already tried and failed to get a source by playing the youtube into several "name that tune" sites

 

I assume David's lassie is not the same as a Bonnie Bonnie lassie??

 

Did you ever see a lassie,

 

I suppose someone on mudcat might know but I would be frightened to go looking over there at night without a head torch!

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Now the trickier part - if the peasants were using the melody back in 17thC as they dropped like flies that must mean it has been around since then.

I don't know anything about the song that's not in the Wikipedia article I linked to in my edit of the previous post.

Just wondering whether there is a type of ring a ring o roses link

 

altho-- it seems they are all arguing now about whether that was the plague as first print version showed up in 1884.

Have they not heard of oral tradition!

 

Anyway - back to the toon hunt...

I need to dig out my The Lore and Language of School-Children by the Opies

http://www.amazon.com/Lore-Language-School-Children-Iona-Peter/dp/0198272065?tag=duckduckgo-d-20

 

and I see Peter Opie is mentioned here in the ring o roses discussion.

 

 

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/ring-a-ring-of-roses.html

 

http://www.bing.com/search?q=ring+a+ring+o+roses+plague+pox&qs=n&form=QBRE&pq=ring+a+ring+o+roses+plague+pox&sc=0-20&sp=-1&sk=

Edited by Kautilya
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Just remembered. My mother used to sing:

 

Horsey, put your tail up,

Your tail up, your tail up.

Horsey, put your tail up,

The sun's in my eyes.

Just in time methodology from Japan I suppose, with a bit of Henry Ford thrown in.

 

We used to wait until it had dropped its load and then mothers allowed us to run to collect it, using a bucket and spade, to put on the rhubarb, although our neighbours put custard on their's. :rolleyes:

 

Now go see next quiz question thread for Xmas playing.

Edited by Kautilya
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