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R. Morse & Co. "Geordie" English Concertina


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I have been eyeing it as well. It would be just what I am looking for depending on.....:

 

The guy at The Music Room in the UK apparently loves it and has posted an enthusiastic blurb about it...

http://www.themusicroom-online.co.uk/product_info.php?products_id=5115

 

But he apparently loves it for song accompaniment. I am yearning for a tenor EC to play instrumental dance music on, and wonder if it is as fast and responsive as needed for that rather than just chordal background stuff....

 

Also, I am intently wondering if the reeds in it are premium "a mano," aka TAM reeds, or factory such as durall/super-durall. Their site description is oddly vague and imprecise as to this factoid. This is an accordion-reeded instrument priced at essentially $3,000.00, which equals the price of some steel-reeded Wheatstone ECs. And fair play, provided that the reeds are premium-grade TAM accordion reeds. For the Three Large, I might well rather have a premium-grade accordion-reeded instrument brand-new with the great Morse action. I would, however, be unenthused about paying essentially $3,000.00 for an accordion-reeded instrument with factory reeds.

Edited by ceemonster
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Knowing the late Rich Morse, Doug Creighton, and Bob Snope, I find it very hard to believe they would go to all the work (multiple prototypes, etc.) I saw them put into designing this and their other models and then fill it with reeds that give any less than the best sound they can get. I would imagine this comment applies to all the makers we talk about here. If you search on Rich Morse's comments (over 1000) on this forum (he was number 10 overall in number of posts at the time of his passing), you will find amazingly detailed analyses of what makes a reed do what it does. You could always call Doug and ask him about the reeds; I'm sure he would tell you.

 

Whether the Geordie (or any model) is what would work best for you, is of course another matter, and a very personal decision. Good luck in making your choice.

 

Ken

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I got a one this summer as a long-awaited upgrade from my Stagi, and I've been really happy with it. It's a nice size and light and I think it sounds wonderful. It's got a very quick and crisp response, definitely suitable for quick dance tunes. It's got a nice dynamic range (for a concertina) as well, which is really nice.

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I own the original Morse Geordie Tenor which I acquired in July, 2010. It's a superb instrument. I bought it to have a more robust instrument for a klezmer project with a local colleague. The action is very quick, and the sound is as close to a traditional concertina as you're likely to find, but more robust if you want it to be. It's versatile and responds to how it is played. My reference for the sound is my Cavagnolo CBA as well as my concertinas with traditional reeds. There is absolutely nothing about this instrument that could even remotely be considered a compromise. Everything about it is first-rate. I played mine regularly for about a year without issue when contributing to Norma's project. I do not play mine regularly now, and I expect to part with it, given that I'm now devoting the bulk of my concertina time to my C-2 Stark duet. I hope is is helpful. Dan

Edited by danersen
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[Knowing the late Rich Morse, Doug Creighton, and Bob Snope, I find it very hard to believe they would go to all the work (multiple prototypes, etc.) I saw them put into designing this and their other models and then fill it with reeds that give any less than the best sound they can get.]

 

the late Mr. Morse posted himself on this site that the reeds in the Morses were perhaps not the ultimate for use at playing fast traditional irish dance music. he himself cited the Edgeley reeds at being aimed specifically at that use.

 

this was obviously some time ago. and it matters. it matters in the sense of, what you want your concertina for. but it also matters in the sense that prices have gone up, way up, since then. for all i know, the reeds may have been upgraded since the post i cited, and may have been upgraded since i purchased a morse ceili to learn on during the mid-aughts and upon inquiring was told the reeds were factory reeds, and that upgrades were not offered as it was not cost-effective for them from a production standpoint. the ceili i purchased cost $1600.00. the instrument under discussion in this thread costs just under $3,000.00. it is very true that materials and production costs have risen markedly over the last seven or so years, but $3,000.00 would not go to purchase a learner instrument for me. it would go to purchase a professional-quality accordion-reeded instrument with premium TAM, "hand-type" reeds. i personally would not be in the market to spend $3,000.00 on a factory-reeded instrument, period.

Edited by ceemonster
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Also, I am intently wondering if the reeds in it are premium "a mano," aka TAM reeds, or factory such as durall/super-durall.

An "a mano" reed is not aka TAM (Tipo a mano), at least according to the Voci Armoniche description under "The Grinder" heading here. "A mano" reeds are cut in batches of two, so the selection and processing of them would seem to be slightly more focused.

 

The two reed types are separated on the Voci Armoniche website. The material processing differs slightly but the text descriptions under "Workmanship" here and here are identical.

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okay. i think you know what i meant. the terminology for various types of premium reeds is all over the map. makers themselves often use the term "handmade" in advertisements when we're supposed to know they mean a not-literally-handmade-but-premium grade above super-durall, be it "TAM," "hand-type," etc. my position about this as a consumer might not be everyone's, but it is emphatic, in this price range, and it would apply to any maker, not solely the one under discussion here. i actually would prefer an accordion-reeded EC (or Anglo) for just about any genre but itm--particularly klezmer, tango, french musette. but in this price range, i definitely want premium reeds.

Edited by ceemonster
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I have been eyeing it as well. It would be just what I am looking for depending on.....:

 

The guy at The Music Room in the UK apparently loves it and has posted an enthusiastic blurb about it...

http://www.themusicroom-online.co.uk/product_info.php?products_id=5115

 

But he apparently loves it for song accompaniment. I am yearning for a tenor EC to play instrumental dance music on, and wonder if it is as fast and responsive as needed for that rather than just chordal background stuff....

 

Also, I am intently wondering if the reeds in it are premium "a mano," aka TAM reeds, or factory such as durall/super-durall. Their site description is oddly vague and imprecise as to this factoid. This is an accordion-reeded instrument priced at essentially $3,000.00, which equals the price of some steel-reeded Wheatstone ECs. And fair play, provided that the reeds are premium-grade TAM accordion reeds. For the Three Large, I might well rather have a premium-grade accordion-reeded instrument brand-new with the great Morse action. I would, however, be unenthused about paying essentially $3,000.00 for an accordion-reeded instrument with factory reeds.

There are at least three quality levels for reeds from the Italian makers:

-A MANO --- hand made quality.

-TIPO A MANO (TAM)--- hand finished

-DURALE --- machine made

 

TAM are not the same as hand-made quality (A MANO)

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