Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Geoffrey Crabb

'Edeophone'

Recommended Posts

Whilst derivation of the term 'concertina' may remain a mystery, :(

'Aeola' can probably be associated with Aeolus (mythology),:)

but any ideas where the term 'Edeo' in 'Edeophone' derives from???:blink:

 

Geoffrey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not often I get to use my Greek these days!!

The 'phone' part is Greek meaning 'sound', hence telephone, gramophone, phonograph.......

It is the convention to avoid hybrid coinings so we can assume the 'edeo' is Greek also. ('Television' is an exception, but 'proculvision' doesn't have much of a ring to it!)

'edeos' is the genitive case of the noun 'edos' meaning 'delight, enjoyment, pleasure'. That seems eminently appropriate to me.

Incidentally, Greek has two 'e's, - a short 'e' (epsilon) as in 'wet' and a long 'e' (eta) as in 'email' or 'edict'. The Greek 'edos' begins with a long eta so that indicates a correct pronunciation of 'EEEdeophone'.

I shall now have to vacuum my room to remove all the dust that's fallen from my trusty Greek - English Lexicon!

Quod erat demonstrandum?

 

Best wishes everyone!

Roger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not often I get to use my Greek these days!!

The 'phone' part is Greek meaning 'sound', hence telephone, gramophone, phonograph.......

It is the convention to avoid hybrid coinings so we can assume the 'edeo' is Greek also. ('Television' is an exception, but 'proculvision' doesn't have much of a ring to it!)

'edeos' is the genitive case of the noun 'edos' meaning 'delight, enjoyment, pleasure'. That seems eminently appropriate to me.

Incidentally, Greek has two 'e's, - a short 'e' (epsilon) as in 'wet' and a long 'e' (eta) as in 'email' or 'edict'. The Greek 'edos' begins with a long eta so that indicates a correct pronunciation of 'EEEdeophone'.

I shall now have to vacuum my room to remove all the dust that's fallen from my trusty Greek - English Lexicon!

Quod erat demonstrandum?

 

Best wishes everyone!

Roger

 

Thank you, Roger!

In the face of this eloquent ane erudite reply who can doubt the value of a classical liberal arts education!! :lol:

 

Liberal Arts majors can only chuckle as those who have taken a more lucrative vocation path mispronounce the names of the multiple

Ed-a-fones, Ay-ee-oel-us, and Jeff-er-ees that they can readilly afford. :o

 

Now, back to the dictionary where I can use my hard won education degree to look up the spelling and definition of "destitute"! :P

 

Greg

 

All the above said tongue in cheek with only the mildest touch of rue and with genuine appreciation of Roger's well crafted and lucid explanation. ;)

Edited by Greg Jowaisas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greg,

Just make sure that you don't get confused with American English and English English when you select your dictionary!!!!

 

Ann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, by the way, The Iliad makes a very good read and you can find out all about the Gods, wind and otherwise, as you read!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It is the convention to avoid hybrid coinings so we can assume the 'edeo' is Greek also.

Hi, Roger. That may have been true in Lachenal's day, but my 35 year old Stedman's Medical Dictionary laments the popularity of words like "cardiovascular."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...