Jump to content

Geo Jones labelled early accordion


SteveS
 Share

Recommended Posts

Heads up on this one - what appears to be a very early accordion and labelled Geo Jones, and made by Busson Brevete on eBay.

Early accordion and connection with Jones concertina maker and music dealer.

Edited by SteveS
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heads up on this one - what appears to be a very early accordion and labelled Geo Jones, and made by Busson Brevete on eBay.

Early accordion and connection with Jones concertina maker and music dealer.

On the name: it probably means patented (breveté)by Busson, and Busson did make their own instruments too, and flutinas.

This link shows an accordion whereas the one you have spotted above is more a harmonium perhaps.

http://orgs.usd.edu/nmm/Exhibitions/BeethovenBerlioz/BBBussonaccordion.html

 

 

 

Tho, intriguingly a Busson comes up in another context =

\The Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors:

breveté s.g.d.g. (Fr.), patented without government guarantee (sans garantie du gouvernement). du Maurier (George Louis Palmella Busson) 1834-96, English artist and author; -- (Sir Gerald), 1873-1934...

koapplib.ru/english/diction/book11.htm

 

But, ho ho, it seems George Louis Palmella Busson Du Maurier (1834-1896) was an artist .....

 

Another Busson connection:

Busson? FlutinaSerial/Year: ca 1870

 

Nice early example of a french flutina, mother of pearl keys and inlaid with brass and coloured laquer, it is all there but will need some restoring, with original oak carrying box

 

http://www.palmguitars.com/page.php?page=For%20Hire%20Only

 

ever more mysteries ...!

Edited by Kautilya
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Found in my archive 'The Buskers Pianette'

 

 

Geoff

George - you should know better from your misspent youth, bunking off from the office down to Chapel Market where these were sold in a number of shops.

 

Their brand name "Singer" indicates they were vocal instruments and the faster you pedalled the faster you sang The Tailor's Song!

I'm not stitching you up - honest! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I won this item.

Not sure whether it's an accordion or harmonium.

But the connection with Geo Jones is interesting.

Fantastic - and only 5,550 ()!!

Will we get to see it at the George? - our player of an INdian harmonium, he came a few times, seems to be stuck in Brighton...........

Edited by Kautilya
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I won this item.

Not sure whether it's an accordion or harmonium.

But the connection with Geo Jones is interesting.

 

If the same as those restored/repaired in the Crabb workshop, probably more akin to Harmonium as being 'single action' the air is 'pushed' through the reeds as the bellows is compressed. Large flap valves in the heel end allowed the bellows to be expanded quickly.

The instruments seen were double reeded i.e. two tongues, tuned wet, riveted side by side on invidual, screwed-on, rectangular brass frames.

If fitted, a single stop, when operated, caused a rod running the length of the instrument to turn and lower attached 'fingers' to mute one reed in each pair if desired.

To adjust the volume, the end with the keyboard partially slides out from the main body uncovering a fretworked section which increases air flow through the reeds (see picture in my previous posting).

 

Be interesting, Steve, if this tallies with the subject instrument.

 

Incidentally the folding stand shown in the picture of The Buskers Pianette was purpose built, the instrument being attached by elasticated straps. When used by itinerant buskers it was a convenience that allowed rapid transport i.e. 'legging it' when confrontation with the constabulary was eminent.

 

 

Geoffrey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the same as those restored/repaired in the Crabb workshop, probably more akin to Harmonium as being 'single action' the air is 'pushed' through the reeds as the bellows is compressed. Large flap valves in the heel end allowed the bellows to be expanded quickly.

The instruments seen were double reeded i.e. two tongues, tuned wet, riveted side by side on invidual, screwed-on, rectangular brass frames.

If fitted, a single stop, when operated, caused a rod running the length of the instrument to turn and lower attached 'fingers' to mute one reed in each pair if desired.

To adjust the volume, the end with the keyboard partially slides out from the main body uncovering a fretworked section which increases air flow through the reeds (see picture in my previous posting).

 

Be interesting, Steve, if this tallies with the subject instrument.

Geoffrey

Very interesting - my technical curiosity is aroused.

It looks very similar to the one in the pic you posted.

Not sure about it being a practical instrument to play though - might be fun trying.

Steve

Edited by SteveS
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heads up on this one - what appears to be a very early accordion and labelled Geo Jones, and made by Busson Brevete on eBay.

Early accordion and connection with Jones concertina maker and music dealer.

A little more info....

After doing some research, this is apparently called variously 'Organ-Accordion', 'Harmoniflute', 'Organine' or 'Piano-Flutina'. Being made by Busson Brevete there are features in common with the flutina. This one is probably from around 1855, around the time the PA was invented.

It it supposedly played placing it across the lap, using one hand for playing the keyboard, and the other operating the bellows.

I like the idea depicted in Geoff's picture though - I might rig up something.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heads up on this one - what appears to be a very early accordion and labelled Geo Jones, and made by Busson Brevete on eBay.

Early accordion and connection with Jones concertina maker and music dealer.

Being made by Busson Brevete...

Before the cops catch you dahn Chapel market, (as the knicker elastic braces snap on your collapsible "Mr Crabb Patent" stand), probably good idea to get your stories in sync! :blink: !

I would check out what I said earlier so you get your cataloguing right now rather than later. In the olden days when u got a name wrong, you would have to throw out your catalogue cards and rewrite new ones: tho "search and replace" makes it easier today to correct errors!

You don't won't to find you are under attack on Mudcat or sometwhere!

 

As far as I can work out it is Patented and probably manufactured by (Monsieur) Busson (and or his Société).

So you can just say ...made by Busson, not "Made by Busson Patent[breveté]". Just as you would say made by Hohner (not made by Hohner Patent)

 

This will help with the provenance when you sell it for 55,000 quid at auction!

 

I think I sent you here already - http://www.accordeon.com/index/squ/fr_squ_00_05_05.shtml

 

I have to admit I am not having much luck tracking down the company directly on French Web*, so it must be long gone bust (like Rushworth and Dreaper who sold tinas and all kinds of instruments in Liverpool http://duckduckgo.com/?q=Rushworth+and+Dreaper

 

*But there must be something in the French patent archive:

http://www.inpi.fr/fr/outils-transversaux/recherche.html?no_cache=1

 

Here is more stuff - you will see the museum says this Busson instrument has a slash separating surname from French word for patent.

http://finchcocks.co.uk/pages/instruments/instrument.php?number=35

 

:)

*

Edited by Kautilya
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as I can work out it is Patented and probably manufactured by (Monsieur) Busson (and or his Société).

So you can just say ...made by Busson, not "Made by Busson Patent". Just as you would say made by Hohner (not made by Hohner Patent)

 

This will help with the provenance when you sell it for 55,000 quid at auction!

 

Here is more stuff - you will see the museum says this Busson instrument has a slash separating surname from French word for patent.

http://finchcocks.co.uk/pages/instruments/instrument.php?number=35

ah, I see, brevete means patent - you should have just said so ;)

Thanks for the Finchcocks link (and the other patent links) - shame that there isn't a picture.

Selling it for 55,000 quid? Any offers?? :ph34r:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...