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Randy Stein

EC Etude Study

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I recently assisted a young man who is toying with a Stagi EC on getting used to reading notes and fingering patterns. The attachment is an etude study Boris Matusewitch gave me years ago and I still warm up my fingers with it.

If you read music and are learning to play and/or improve, this is a very good way to get to know your box and get some memory into your fingers.

just saying...

 

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Thanks for sharing that I always need something new to learn.Any chance you have something to help me with counterpoint?? I'd so appreciate some help there. There's so little to work with in the books i have. geoff

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Since étude is French for "study," the thread heading is a little redundant.

 

That's why I play it twice rolleyes.gif

 

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Since étude is French for "study," the thread heading is a little redundant.

 

That's why I play it twice rolleyes.gif

 

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Twice? I'm pretty pleased with having managed to slowly stumble through it once. Never mind 'warming up your fingers' with that, I think I need a lie down ....

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Any chance you have something to help me with counterpoint??

 

Do you mean just the music, or with annotations (e.g. fingering). If the former, then there is some here.

 

In order to play counterpoint you need to be able to be able to play both lines independently - even if top and bottom are moving at the same speed (e.g. crotchets) it just does not work, generally, to play them as a series of two note chords. In order to practice that I suggest:

 

1. Play an scale up and down one octave, e.g. in G starting on the left side. Make sure you articulate each note, i.e. give a little pulse to accent the start of each note, but each note has a full length, with very little gap between it and the next.

 

2. Now add the octave below. At first just play the upper and lower notes together, with the same duration, until you're happy with the fingering so that you don't need to jump fingers, and can play it easily at a reasonable speed (e.g. 120 notes per minute).

 

3. Next do the same, but this time play the lower note shorter - e.g. about half length. Also use the bellows to articulate the top note - it should sound exactly like in 1. above, just with the lower note playing too and not drowning out the top line.

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I brought copies of the first one to a tune session years ago and passed them out. After initial reactions, I said "Have a look at it at home, maybe we'll play it next week."

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The Etude looks like Regondi's Golden Exercise - it is found in Atlas book "Comtemplating the Concertina".

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