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A tune on the English Concertina


fernando
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Hi everybody!

 

I hope you like this, this is me playing a Wheatstone model 22. I'm trying to play a Muñeira, this is a 6/8 type of tune that they play in different places in the North of Spain, this one is from Asturias.

 

I hope you enjoy!

 

 

nice!

Edited by fearfeasog
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Nice tune Fernando !

 

Is this sounding 'more Irish' than it would do, due to your time and absorbtion in Irish music ? Or is this really the way a player from northern Spain would play it ?

 

Just a question, not a criticism ?

 

Best regards,

Geoff.

 

Hi Geoff! Actually, I found a video of the Asturian band I learnt the tune from, they start playing it in the minute 0:47:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kN4pAnFGf7U&feature=related

 

I would say that in the North of Spain (Galicia, Asturias and Cantabria) they play very similar to Irish Music. The difference are the melodies, they are different, you can tell It is not Irish Music.

 

Best Regards,

 

Fernando

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Nice, what does Muneira mean? i've heard similar played in Catalunya, Spain on those reeded oboe-like instruments that are very loud ,like bombardes.Was it a graile (I've see and heard them in France too)

 

Hi Sam! I don't know the meaning of the word muñeira. But I doubt it there are some of these in Catalonia, they have their own distinct music the catalans. The word muñeira is associated to Galicia, Asturias and Cantabria. The gralla is a beautiful instrument, I know better the dulzaina, It is the one they play in Castille. I tried to play one of those and I had to gave up, I couldn´t cope with the pain I had in the lips! :D

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Nice playing fernando; mainieras, monferrinas and the like sit very well on EC, as you've demonstrated.

 

I can remember when the English Country Music crowd were first introduced to the wonderful likes of La Musgana and Milladoiro by, IIRC, Rod Stradling, and many people, myself included, were struck and captivated by how like Southern English tunes they are - I guess you hear similarities with what you're used to!

 

[Edit: fixed spelling of Milladoiro]

Edited by Steve Mansfield
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ha, sorry, perhaps i have you confused with the gent who is in ireland and who has professed that goal! anyway, your spanish folk playing IMHO is excellent evidence that irish "lift" and articulation can be achieved dandily on EC....:)

 

Hi! you are right, I'm one of those that are living in Ireland and want to prove that Irish Music can be played on the English System. I play Irish Music as well. This is the eternal discussion, a lot have been written about this. I still think that It can be done. I'm trying to use the bellows in the Anglo style, I'm not using them like a Piano Accordion. Anyway, with his own distinct style of playing, I think Simon Thoumire has already proved it. Me, I'm 33 years old now, I started a bit late, and I only play when I feel like playing, I don't think I will get to prove this way of playing on my own, but I hope I'm giving ideas to people and maybe they can be useful to them. Once I saw one American concertinist, playing the English System, doing with the bellows exactly the same as me, I don't remember his name now..

 

Nice playing fernando; mainieras, monferrinas and the like sit very well on EC, as you've demonstrated.

 

I can remember when the English Country Music crowd were first introduced to the wonderful likes of La Musgana and Milladoiro by, IIRC, Rod Stradling, and many people, myself included, were struck and captivated by how like Southern English tunes they are - I guess you hear similarities with what you're used to!

 

[Edit: fixed spelling of Milladoiro]

 

Hi! La Musgaña and Milladoiro, are bands that are very important to me, I enjoyed listening them a lot and many times I've been trying to play their music. I like English Music as well, I have a few tunes that I play with the concertina Steve, lovely music indeed.

Edited by fernando
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  • 4 weeks later...

Nice, what does Muneira mean? i've heard similar played in Catalunya, Spain on those reeded oboe-like instruments that are very loud ,like bombardes.Was it a graile (I've see and heard them in France too)

 

Hi Sam! I don't know the meaning of the word muñeira. But I doubt it there are some of these in Catalonia, they have their own distinct music the catalans. The word muñeira is associated to Galicia, Asturias and Cantabria. The gralla is a beautiful instrument, I know better the dulzaina, It is the one they play in Castille. I tried to play one of those and I had to gave up, I couldn´t cope with the pain I had in the lips! :D

 

 

Well, here's what I found about it:

 

La Muñeira

The word Muñeira etymologically comes from the Galician muiño (mill) and it is the most characteristic dance from Galicia. It is of an uncertain origin and some authors find its origin as far as the pre-roman dances, whilst others consider it to be in the festivals that took place in the mills whilst peasants waited for their flour. The dance has different steps throughout the various regions and begins with a row of men and a row of women facing each other. The man performs with strong and impetuous movements the turns and pirouettes with his arms up high whilst the woman performs with slow, timid movements and her arms down. It has at least two main parts: the punto, which has many variations depending on the dancers' skill and the volta, or wheel dancers perform changing positions. The dance is accompanied by bagpipe music, bass drums and tambourines. The best known amongst the different varieties are the tocadas, the cantadas, the acordadas and the no acordadas. The most popular being the muñeira do espantallo, inspired by a scarecrow.

 

Chris

 

PS Nice tune and lovely playing, Fernando.

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