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Dirge = getting a Handel on bassoon and oboe


Kautilya
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Just finished on bbc radio 3 so you can get it soon on iplayer (i was listening live outside UK so radio must be accessible === I lie! - it is there for seven days from now.....

 

Basically the basson is chased by the oboe not to be so boring and come out to play!

 

composer of the week

George Frideric Handel Sonata in B flat major HWV.357, ed. Dart for oboe and continuo

 

Performer: George MALCOLM - Harpsichord Performer: Graham SHEEN - Bassoon Performer: Neil BLACK - Oboe

 

PHILIPS, 4124982, 1-3

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01kptv0

 

We look forward to enjoying from your box (and it goes fast later on, as you like it!)

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I just want to make sure everyone reading this understands what "continuo" is all about (as in "Sonata in B flat major HWV.357, ed. Dart for oboe and continuo").

 

Continuo is a kind of instrumental accompaniment used frequently by baroque composers where neither the instrumentation nor the actual notes are specified by the composer. All the composer sets down are a bass line and some numbers associated with it ("Figured Bass") that suggest what notes to play over the bass line. It usually takes two people to play a continuo part: one (a bassoon or cello or bass viola da gamba, etc.) playing the bass line and the other (a harpsichord or lute, etc.) also playing the bass line and filling in the upper notes by improvising on the figured bass. So in the recording in question, the oboe is playing the solo part, the harpsichord is playing the bass line with the left hand and filling in the figures with the right (most modern music publishers supply a suggested right-hand part that follows the figures so the performer doesn't have to make it all up on the spot) and the bassoon is doubling the bass line.

 

By the way, "ed. Dart" means "edited by Dart" which is Thurston Dart, a harpsichordist and musicologist.

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I just want to make sure everyone reading this understands what "continuo" is all about (as in "Sonata in B flat major HWV.357, ed. Dart for oboe and continuo").

 

Continuo is a kind of instrumental accompaniment used frequently by baroque composers where neither the instrumentation nor the actual notes are specified by the composer. All the composer sets down are a bass line and some numbers associated with it ("Figured Bass") that suggest what notes to play over the bass line. It usually takes two people to play a continuo part: one (a bassoon or cello or bass viola da gamba, etc.) playing the bass line and the other (a harpsichord or lute, etc.) also playing the bass line and filling in the upper notes by improvising on the figured bass. So in the recording in question, the oboe is playing the solo part, the harpsichord is playing the bass line with the left hand and filling in the figures with the right (most modern music publishers supply a suggested right-hand part that follows the figures so the performer doesn't have to make it all up on the spot) and the bassoon is doubling the bass line.

 

By the way, "ed. Dart" means "edited by Dart" which is Thurston Dart, a harpsichordist and musicologist.

which, without the harpsichord,spells out why it is perfect for a two-handed tina player with a Dirgeload of buttons! Einstein was just commenting at the barber's the other day that of course the space-time continuum is much fuller when string theory is brought into play so in fact, he suggested, these toons are probably more suitable for fiddlers....

 

Dirge - is this score any use (tho for orgue)

http://conquest.imslp.info/files/imglnks/usimg/c/c3/IMSLP222394-WIMA.7c46-H_II_Org.pdf

Edited by Kautilya
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in fact, he [Einstein] suggested, these toons are probably more suitable for fiddlers....

 

Well, Einstein was a violinist himself!

 

Basso continuo is a nice thing, even for an "Irish" folk goup like ours. Carolan's pieces are very popular nowadays, and a quick look at his biography shows that he was an elder contemporary of J.S. Bach - which makes him baroque. So we do things like Planxty Irwin and Sí bheag sí mhor (AKA She begs for more) with anglo and violin on melody and alto line, plus steel-string guitar and bowed double bass. We've got the melody, someone writes or borrows a second line, the guitarist plays by the chord symbols, and the bass player (who has usually arranged the whole thing anyway) takes the bottom line.

It still works, even today!

 

Cheers,

John

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I just want to make sure everyone reading this understands what "continuo" is all about (as in "Sonata in B flat major HWV.357, ed. Dart for oboe and continuo").

 

Continuo is a kind of instrumental accompaniment used frequently by baroque composers where neither the instrumentation nor the actual notes are specified by the composer. All the composer sets down are a bass line and some numbers associated with it ("Figured Bass") that suggest what notes to play over the bass line. It usually takes two people to play a continuo part: one (a bassoon or cello or bass viola da gamba, etc.) playing the bass line and the other (a harpsichord or lute, etc.) also playing the bass line and filling in the upper notes by improvising on the figured bass. So in the recording in question, the oboe is playing the solo part, the harpsichord is playing the bass line with the left hand and filling in the figures with the right (most modern music publishers supply a suggested right-hand part that follows the figures so the performer doesn't have to make it all up on the spot) and the bassoon is doubling the bass line.

 

By the way, "ed. Dart" means "edited by Dart" which is Thurston Dart, a harpsichordist and musicologist.

which, without the harpsichord,spells out why it is perfect for a two-handed tina player with a Dirgeload of buttons! Einstein was just commenting at the barber's the other day that of course the space-time continuum is much fuller when string theory is brought into play so in fact, he suggested, these toons are probably more suitable for fiddlers....

 

Dirge - is this score any use (tho for orgue)

http://conquest.imslp.info/files/imglnks/usimg/c/c3/IMSLP222394-WIMA.7c46-H_II_Org.pdf

Sorry K.; I was enjoying the fine West Country drizzle on Exmoor for a few days, so I've only just seen this.

 

Well I probably could do something with it but I think I do better to stick to Handel's keyboard stuff as a rule. This needs me to bring out 2 tunes prominently and add in a harmony quietly in the background (I realise you are suggesting I forget the continuo but...) It is more of a challenge than something written for keyboard where Handel KNEW the player would have little control over individual note volume. This is why I like baroque music; I can add dynamics that handel could only dream of and otherwise do all he would expect.

 

Nice piece though, I thoroughly enjoyed listening to it, and I have worked out that we share a common admiration for Uncle George.

 

But I couldn't (on a quick listen) tie in the score to the music. Is it the same piece/ It's easy enough and sounds great. The only catch here is the H2 is in NZ...

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But I couldn't (on a quick listen) tie in the score to the music. Is it the same piece/

It's the 2nd movement, starting at index number 0:54:40 of the radio broadcast. The pdf doesn't include the oboe part, just the continuo, and it is realized differently than in the recording (see my previous post on this thread). The bass line is the same line that the bassoonist is playing and the harpsichordist is playing with his left hand. But everything else in the pdf is Michel Rondeau's suggestion of how to realize the figured bass on the organ, and in the broadcast recording the harpsichordist is making different decisions as to what to do with his right hand.

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Ah. Thanks for that. I didn't twig that it's an oboe solo short of a six pack.

I never saw any six pack when you were playing at ECMW in your vest -- more of a six-fold beer bellows.... :lol:

 

Re:OBuggerOe!

We now know,as the saying goes "You can't drag a horse to Dirgemoor in order to drown it in the river":

 

So you must now go from Exmoor to PYongyang via Albany (watch our for commission agents Shanghaiing beer drinkers with chloroform to force em to play tina in HM Royal Navy) then Copenhagen, then Trondheim where your destiny will be fulfilled (well... I keep on hoping!) :)

Cant pull up the link to thread but look for North Korea accordion y'day or so.... :) :)

Edited by Kautilya
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