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Simon H

As new baritone

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David always makes a lovely job of his restorations, his is the standard we should all seek to emulate.

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Aye, but as he said, this only needed valves as they'd stiffened a bit with age, the rest is as- new !

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umm. well a bit more than just valves. tuned to modern pitch plus new thumb straps and finger rests. thats 96 reeds to work on. 96. its an exercise in zen meditation. try it sometime. its good for the soul.

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Just re-pitched a 48 key treble today, brain now shrivelled.

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Yes, been there done that on my 64 TT.

 

I guess my point was to point out to this group there was a nice baritone for sale in remarkable condition.

 

Never mind.

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So this is what a Baritone layout looks like proper.

 

I suppose this would be the model 20 9, which looks like it swaps the sides so that middle C transfers onto the RHS, i.e. unlike the slightly different model 14 Baritone-Treble where middle C remains on the LHS.

 

I first surmised this on a different post prior to Geoff showing me the actual model 14 and 16 layouts of the [variant] Baritone-Trebles.

 

I'm glad I've now seen the evidence of what I'd first surmised: that standard Baritones would have to swap sides to keep to the standard button layouts to which model 14 B-Ts digress.

 

I'll need to update my scholarly entry on the teaching forum post I'd replied to. Will do in a moment, where there's an interesting discussion going on RE the differences in EC button layouts.

 

I'd personally feel inclined to avoid the model 20/20a layouts 9s/10s [possibly model 20/20a Aeola equivalents too] due to the cerebral difficulty in swapping hands after acclimatising to the middle C on the LHS.

 

If this is indeed the model 9 (walnut 48k) then it's coming in at quite a bargain as I'd have thought 1.6k would be more correct, based on second hand. However if this really is as good as new then you x2 that figure to 3.2k, in my opinion. Would this be right thereabouts, although perhaps there's an intermediate value between 1) good-as-new and 2) good-condition. Such as perhaps reconditioned or recently-overhauled, which might be the good-condition price plus the cost of overhaul (?)

Edited by kevin toner

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Kevin.

I fear you have got it wrong. A standard Baritone, as per the instrument illustrated, is in every way similar to a standard 48 treble, but every note plays an octave lower. No brain power needed to effect the change. If you look at the photograph the third button on the outer of the two midle rows is coloured red, indicating that it plays a C, exactly where a C should be, just an octave lower than the note a similarly placed C would play on a 48 treble. Simples! Give one a try at the earliest opportunity - you'll never look back.

Les

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Kevin.

I fear you have got it wrong. A standard Baritone, as per the instrument illustrated, is in every way similar to a standard 48 treble, but every note plays an octave lower. No brain power needed to effect the change. If you look at the photograph the third button on the outer of the two midle rows is coloured red, indicating that it plays a C, exactly where a C should be, just an octave lower than the note a similarly placed C would play on a 48 treble. Simples! Give one a try at the earliest opportunity - you'll never look back.

Les

 

Yes true, the red button here is a 'middle C' (C4), but I'd rather play this as a C5 since I'm a sight reader and read from the stave; and therefore prefer to feel for 'middle C' on the LHS handing instead!

 

Simple yes!

 

The complex side might be that we can pretend its C5 C4 is a C4 C5, but then in doing so we'd lose the advantage of having those extra few more bass notes that we hanker for when trying to interpret bass clef in piano score work.

 

You're right, in that I'd need to try one first to determine whether or not swapping hands from what I'm used to will be taxing. I trust it might be, but I really wouldn't know yet before trying.

Edited by kevin toner

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Lovely baritone in incredible untouched condition spotted on EBay. Wish I had the right excuse to buy it : http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Early-Wheatstone-baritone-concertina-/280906549442?pt=UK_MusicalInstr_Keyboard_RL&hash=item416755c8c2#ht_500wt_922

 

Simon

 

Excuse? Surely you've heard the wise old Norfolk saying:

"When rosebuds do burst and the bumblebees drone,

'Tis time to invest in a nice baritone!"

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In some of the past discussions regard the "colored buttons" there seems to be a general thought that these instruments were tutors and not perhaps of equal quality to those that do not have the colored buttons. Your thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

StephenTx

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coloured buttons do not a tutor makerolleyes.gif

My Joseph Scates has coloured buttons - it is made of Amboyna - you wouldn't use a wood like Amboyna for a 'tutor' concertina.

My Wheatstone Baritone (almost identical to the one on ebay) with coloured buttons is not a tutor. One thing I would say is that brass reeded Baritones can be a bit slow at the lower end. Dave Elliott improved mine significantly by adding springs that prevent the lower valves from opening more than they need tosmile.gif

I think this would still be a very good Baritone to own

chris

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Argh...I've been on the lookout for a baritone just like this, but unfortunately I just put down a thousand quid for a Lachenal new model tenor, and another concertina purchase so soon just isn't in the cards. I hope it goes to a good home.

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coloured buttons do not a tutor makerolleyes.gif

My Joseph Scates has coloured buttons - it is made of Amboyna - you wouldn't use a wood like Amboyna for a 'tutor' concertina.

My Wheatstone Baritone (almost identical to the one on ebay) with coloured buttons is not a tutor. One thing I would say is that brass reeded Baritones can be a bit slow at the lower end. Dave Elliott improved mine significantly by adding springs that prevent the lower valves from opening more than they need tosmile.gif

I think this would still be a very good Baritone to own

chris

 

 

My 1854 Wheatstone Baritone, has identical fretwork to the one David is selling, but has metal buttons. I believe, as a purchaser, in those days, when you placed your order for a concertina, you could specify whether you wanted it to have bone buttons or metal buttons, and later on, even glass buttons, regardless of the model type. Mine's serial number is 5199. I wonder what this one for sale's, is?

 

Chris

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Mine's serial number is 5199. I wonder what this one for sale's, is?

 

Chris

 

5180, Chris - just a few months older than yours.

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Mine's serial number is 5199. I wonder what this one for sale's, is?

 

Chris

 

5180, Chris - just a few months older than yours.

 

 

Thanks for that, David. It's nice to know that there is another survivor from the period. Now, all I need to do, is buy it, and swap my metal buttons and serial number over, to make mine like new! :)

 

Chris

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mine's 9408 so a little bit later - looks identical tho'

chris

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