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Yes, I know it's not a chair, but...


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Thought I'd share this recent discovery. A good friend of mine, a skilled woodworker, put me on to something called "Chair Doctor". It's intended for injecting glue into dodgy mortice and tenon joints in chairs - and injecting is the right word, because it is a very low viscosity adhesive that comes complete with a sort of hypodermic syringe. This is the easiest way I have yet found of getting glue into delaminated areas of wooden concertina ends, or under areas of lifting veneer. The very fine needle (it comes with a choice of three) will reach places that are out of range of a brush, and it seems to do a good, sound job. Read all about it here.

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Looks good. The method works even better with hot hide glue, which can be mixed very thin. Easy to clean up with warm water as well.

Hide glue might be preferred for wooden ends because it dries hard and strong and is completely reversible.

Although injecting any sort of glue won't work if the joint is poor. If the joint is not good, you need to fix the joint.

 

 

 

 

Thought I'd share this recent discovery. A good friend of mine, a skilled woodworker, put me on to something called "Chair Doctor". It's intended for injecting glue into dodgy mortice and tenon joints in chairs - and injecting is the right word, because it is a very low viscosity adhesive that comes complete with a sort of hypodermic syringe. This is the easiest way I have yet found of getting glue into delaminated areas of wooden concertina ends, or under areas of lifting veneer. The very fine needle (it comes with a choice of three) will reach places that are out of range of a brush, and it seems to do a good, sound job. Read all about it here.

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David

 

I've used this for some time and I agree, it's a great product for veneer repairs. It's an aliphatic resin I believe, similar to Titebond, but flows much more easily. When I was re-veneering ebony onto a Jeffries, I did a few trials and Chair Doctor also gave the best bond.

 

The only thing to be careful of is that the syringes are so small they gum up very easily. so you have to be careful to blow air through after glueing. I also used the inside of a wire tie as a "reamer" to clear the bore of the syringe

 

Alex West

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David

 

The only thing to be careful of is that the syringes are so small they gum up very easily. so you have to be careful to blow air through after glueing. I also used the inside of a wire tie as a "reamer" to clear the bore of the syringe

 

Alex West

No need, Alex. Whatever the glue is, it's water soluble, so just squirt the leftovers back into the bottle, fill the syringe with warm water, reattach the needle and squirt it through a few times.

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David

 

The only thing to be careful of is that the syringes are so small they gum up very easily. so you have to be careful to blow air through after glueing. I also used the inside of a wire tie as a "reamer" to clear the bore of the syringe

 

Alex West

No need, Alex. Whatever the glue is, it's water soluble, so just squirt the leftovers back into the bottle, fill the syringe with warm water, reattach the needle and squirt it through a few times.

Let me revise that opinion. Returning to the finest needle a week after the first use, I find it irremediably blocked, in spite of what I thought was thorough sluicing through. You were right, Alex, and I'm now going in search of a wire tie and a small slice of humble pie...

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Not to get too far off topic, it performs as advertised. I've used it a few times on old wooden chairs and stools that had become a bit loose and wobbly. It did a stellar job of penetrating and then securing the joints tight. It's been some years and the repairs are still solid.

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Go to your local Pharmacy and buy a box of hypodermic syringe barrels and a box of the largest gauge hypodermic syringe needles. I think that the boxes each contain 100 items, and my needles are, I think 16 gauge. Dirt cheap, disposable (carefully) and enough to last you many years. Choose your own glue.

 

Loading is done by sucking the glue into the barrel without the needle on, then screw on the needle and eject air from the unit by doing what you have seen the TV docs do. When you are done just throw the whole thing away after recovering any glue that you want to keep.

 

Just today, I was using this technique to inject thickened epoxy into some teak (no not a teak concertina although that would be nice). Anyway it works a treat. Do be careful not to stick yourself as they are razor sharp points.

 

While you are at the Pharmacy buy a box (100) of little graduated medicine cups for precise measurement of two part glues - these cost me $5 for 100, and a box of 500 large tongue depressors for mixing your potions - another $5.

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