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Making metal ends


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I am contemplating making a set of metal ends for a Wheatstone Aeola. The current Wooden ends are in reasonable condition and the instrument sounds fine but for some occasions I could do with a little more volume and 'bite'. So,I'm thinking, what if I produce new top frames with Metal grills that can be exchanged for the wooden ones.

 

Perhaps it is simpler and cheaper to just attach a microphone to each end.. well yes that might be true and I have done that but, in a noisy situation ( when playing with a band) it is more a case that I cannot hear what I am playing. I took to using a guitar amplifier placed just behind my chair so that I could balance the Concertina output to the ambient noise level around me. This solution worked well for a while untill I bought a metal ended Treble EC which needs no artificial boost. This means that I don't have to haul all the electrical paraphenalia to gigs... but then I do not have the range of my big Aeola.

 

So, I am looking to produce Octagonal Raised ends for this 8 inch Aeola and pierce them in a traditional patern.

 

Any suggestions or advice ?

 

 

Geoff :)

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I am contemplating making a set of metal ends for a Wheatstone Aeola. The current Wooden ends are in reasonable condition and the instrument sounds fine but for some occasions I could do with a little more volume and 'bite'. So,I'm thinking, what if I produce new top frames with Metal grills that can be exchanged for the wooden ones.

 

Perhaps it is simpler and cheaper to just attach a microphone to each end.. well yes that might be true and I have done that but, in a noisy situation ( when playing with a band) it is more a case that I cannot hear what I am playing. I took to using a guitar amplifier placed just behind my chair so that I could balance the Concertina output to the ambient noise level around me. This solution worked well for a while untill I bought a metal ended Treble EC which needs no artificial boost. This means that I don't have to haul all the electrical paraphenalia to gigs... but then I do not have the range of my big Aeola.

 

So, I am looking to produce Octagonal Raised ends for this 8 inch Aeola and pierce them in a traditional patern.

 

Any suggestions or advice ?

 

 

Geoff :)

 

Yes. Save yourself a lot of grief and pay a little money to PX yours for a metal end version from one of the big dealers. Make another set of pipes to pay for it.

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Geoff

 

Go for it, none of it is rocket science. A jewllers saw and drill press will do most of it, slightly trickier is some sort of bezel around the edge for strength. You could fold it like a lachenal or make a crude press tool for a Jeffries style bend. I have a tool made from two pieces of 16 gauge steel which is very usable. You also have to make a bushing board.

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Dirge;

I would do as you suggest but this is a Baritone/Treble EC and these are not exactly plentifull in the Dealer's inventories.

 

Two metal ended versions came up recently.. the last one was bought by Ptarmigan of this parish... but I could not buy them because I had agreed with the owner of mine to buy it,which I have since done, and could not justify buying two such expensive Concertinas.

 

Another option; I have old friend who has a 64key Baritone Aeola EC that I might possibly persuade him to sell me but... the fingering between a Baritone and a Baritone/ treble is quite different... it is as if the reedpan for the left side has been put in on the right side.... which might appear to be a simple enough thing to change them about but, as always, it ain't quite so.

 

 

Chris;

 

I suppose I could make the ends in the manner of a Jeffries (or Lachenal) ... that would be the simplest method for me.... though I had thought to either insert the metal plates inboard of a moulded wooden edging , thus using tiny screws to fix the plates down to the top frames or, turn the edges down through 90° in the form of tabs, like cutting out the models on the back of Cornflakes packets, and screwing through these to the top frames on the insides as was done by Wheatstone.

Both of these second options could be quite a bit more difficult.

 

If making a 'Raised Metal End' would it be best to do the piercing whilst the plate is still flat ?

 

Cheers,

Geoff.

Edited by Geoff Wooff
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I suppose I could make the ends in the manner of a Jeffries (or Lachenal) ... that would be the simplest method for me.... though I had thought to either insert the metal plates inboard of a moulded wooden edging , thus using tiny screws to fix the plates down to the top frames or, turn the edges down through 90° in the form of tabs, like cutting out the models on the back of Cornflakes packets, and screwing through these to the top frames on the insides as was done by Wheatstone.

Both of these second options could be quite a bit more difficult.

 

More difficult but nicer, ie. the theory of relativity is in good shape! I don't think you would find either of those methods a huge challenge, but you might need to play with the materials a little first. Not sure but I think they soldered the vertical joins in the Cornflakes style ends.

 

The most exacting part will getting the button holes in the right place.

 

If you do it to a paper pattern get the lines on the pattern to be grey rather than black, they are easier to distinguish from the blade.

 

 

If making a 'Raised Metal End' would it be best to do the piercing whilst the plate is still flat ?

 

I have not made raised ends, but I have always put the design in before creating the bezel in a Jeffries style end. I see no problem with doing it the other way around though you would then need to cut it from the back with all of the complication in reversing the pattern.

 

I can't help feeling this is a group of questions Geoff Crabb could give answers to best. He gave me the tip about grey lines.

 

Chris

Edited by Chris Ghent
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If making a 'Raised Metal End' would it be best to do the piercing whilst the plate is still flat ?

 

Geoff - when I made the raised ends for the TT in my avatar I pressed the uncut ends.

 

Mind you they are laminated wood - my reasoning was that cutting before pressing may run the risk of damaging the ends and wasting perhaps 60 hours or more time invested in the cutting the fretwork. The only risk then is to materials and relatively little time, not materials and loads of time.

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Geoff,

your quest for tips or advice has attracted replies that cover some points but there are many other considerations that have to be taken into account. Unfortunately, I am not good at impromptu replies on 'paper' and will add further comments when I have composed them. In the meantime....

 

Before attempting changing wood tops for metal replacements on a concertina in the hope of increasing the volume, it really is, if possible, worth trying an existing metal top version of the same model. This may save many hours of work and a possible disappointing result.

 

I am not going to engage in techno-babble as to why but octagonal instruments are usually more mellow than hexagonal whether wood or metal top. Also the size of an instrument can affect output unless designed specifically for loudness in which case some response may be compromised. Of course, every individual instrument, even new, can have its own 'unexplained' characteristics so my comments are personal.

 

You have not said if the metal topped Treble EC you acquired is hex. or oct. and I think that it may not be best to expect a similar performance purely by converting your Baritone/Treble Aeola to metal tops.

 

If an instrument considered for change other than repair or as an experiment which is regarded as a good, working, possibly valuable example then great care should be exercised in preserving any original parts intact so that the work can be reversed should results not be as expected.

 

Geoffrey

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If making a 'Raised Metal End' would it be best to do the piercing whilst the plate is still flat ?

 

Geoff - when I made the raised ends for the TT in my avatar I pressed the uncut ends.

 

Mind you they are laminated wood - my reasoning was that cutting before pressing may run the risk of damaging the ends and wasting perhaps 60 hours or more time invested in the cutting the fretwork. The only risk then is to materials and relatively little time, not materials and loads of time.

 

 

Thanks for that Steve,

I agree it makes sense, at least for the first time, to press the shape first.

 

Geoff.

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Geoff,

your quest for tips or advice has attracted replies that cover some points but there are many other considerations that have to be taken into account. Unfortunately, I am not good at impromptu replies on 'paper' and will add further comments when I have composed them. In the meantime....

 

Before attempting changing wood tops for metal replacements on a concertina in the hope of increasing the volume, it really is, if possible, worth trying an existing metal top version of the same model. This may save many hours of work and a possible disappointing result.

 

I am not going to engage in techno-babble as to why but octagonal instruments are usually more mellow than hexagonal whether wood or metal top. Also the size of an instrument can affect output unless designed specifically for loudness in which case some response may be compromised. Of course, every individual instrument, even new, can have its own 'unexplained' characteristics so my comments are personal.

 

You have not said if the metal topped Treble EC you acquired is hex. or oct. and I think that it may not be best to expect a similar performance purely by converting your Baritone/Treble Aeola to metal tops.

 

If an instrument considered for change other than repair or as an experiment which is regarded as a good, working, possibly valuable example then great care should be exercised in preserving any original parts intact so that the work can be reversed should results not be as expected.

 

Geoffrey

 

 

 

Geoffrey,

many thanks for your well considered points and it has made me think about the instruments I have more clearly.

 

I had thought to make the new ends in such a way that all the original parts were kept, as you suggest.

 

The 48 Treble is a Wheatstone metal ended Hex model with Flat Reedpans from 1898 so it sounds quite similar to a Linota Anglo. Whilst not being as loud as some of the Lachenal New Model's with metal ends it does project its voice briliantly, clearly and with sweetness. This one is doing its job wonderfully well in the front line of a dance band where all the other instruments have big voices.

 

I cannot expect my Baritone /Treble Aeola to have the same power, agreed, and I realise that it was designed with a different purpose in mind. Thinking about what you have said and in regard to the style that I have been developing on it I can see that it is the way it is for a reason. I think that these Baritone/Trebles were destined for people who wished to add bass lines and harmonies to an already developed Treble playing style and not particularly to play Baritone range parts.

Therefore the lower notes are not meant to be loud but to play a suporting role to the melody line. The result can be quite Duet like and since taking up the Maccann during the last year I have been trying to emulate the Duet effect, on the B/T, by playing pieces from Piano scores.

The instrument in question is a very good playing example and perhaps I should not, as you say, do anything to to "improve" it before trying a similar metal ended model.

 

Again many thanks for the 'reality check'.

 

Best regards,

Geoff.

Edited by Geoff Wooff
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Henrik,

 

here it is...

 

It is made from 16 gauge galvanised steel which is adequate because nickel silver is very soft.

 

I cut the inner male from the outer female with a completely inadequate tool, a scroll saw, because it was in front of me. The tricky part, not very tricky, was deciding how much of a gap to have between the inner and outer parts. I recollect it was 2mm. I shaped the underside of the outer ring to allow a nice shape to the curve. I fixed the inner male to another piece of galv steel as a base plate.

 

To operate it, I first place the nickel silver, which is a few mm oversize, on the top of the inner, aligning the design, which I have cut out, to a picture of the design I have fixed to the top of the jig since taking this photo. I then place the outer ring over the top, aligning the holes with the pins you can see in the lower part. I clamp the sandwich temporarily with large plastic spring clamps, carry it to the vice and squash each side in turn in the vice.

 

Understand this is a crude device, but I made it to do one in experimental mode, and ended up making ten sets with it without a single wasted piece.

post-74-0-16452900-1335227996_thumb.jpeg

post-74-0-16634300-1335233404_thumb.jpg

Edited by Chris Ghent
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