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Looking for a English Baritone Vintage Concertina


StephenTx
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Colleagues, If any of you should hear of or have an English Vintage Baritones, I am thinking I might like to acquire such. As most of you know I began my journey last July and acquired in fairly rapid succession a Lachenal Brass Reeded tutor, Wheatstone (1852) steel and and Edeophone metal ended that I purchased through cnet. Greg has done a fantastic job in restoring the Lachenal and Wheatstone and the Edeophone is schedule to go for a check up but she's in tune and in good shape (may need some new pads or minor work). It has been a great process having all three to play and to get a feel for the variety. But what I am coming to realize is that while there are differences between the Wheatstone and the Edeophone I would probably be better off in having a Baritone and either trade or selling one of them to do so to acquire the Baritone. I would also appreciate your wisdom and thoughts with my perceptions---as I have found that there are many time altered when taping into this vast knowledge pool. I have communicated with C.Algar but would prefer to find one (for obvious reasons) US based. Stephen in Texas

Edited by StephenTx
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*nudge* Bring them all to the Old Palestine festival so that I can check them out...the only other 'tina I've been able to put hands on other than my Jackie was a 20-button Lachenal Anglo just this past weekend, for about five minutes. B)

Edited by Reed Bellows
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I'm quite fond of my baritone. It has nickel silver reeds in hand cut reed shoes, so must date from 1849 or so. A very mellow instrument if a bit temperamental. It is nice to have the variety. It took a little while for the baritone to come along--it was languishing in Australia and went to Wim Wakker for rehab after I got it. It's better traveled than I am.

 

I have also played a steel reeded Lachenal baritone which was much louder and more brash. I guess part of my point is that a baritone could be an early parlor instrument or a later band instrument and the character of the sound could be quite different.

 

Good luck in your search. I'm going to hang on to mine, though my heirs might not!

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I'm quite fond of my baritone. It has nickel silver reeds in hand cut reed shoes, so must date from 1849 or so. A very mellow instrument if a bit temperamental. It is nice to have the variety. It took a little while for the baritone to come along--it was languishing in Australia and went to Wim Wakker for rehab after I got it. It's better traveled than I am.

 

I have also played a steel reeded Lachenal baritone which was much louder and more brash. I guess part of my point is that a baritone could be an early parlor instrument or a later band instrument and the character of the sound could be quite different.

 

Good luck in your search. I'm going to hang on to mine, though my heirs might not!

 

I have a Wheatstone Baritone, Wakker refurbished, and it's just beautiful! 1851 or so, with brass reeds, rosewood. The bass notes are just so deep and... well you know. I lucked out with an eBay auction from the UK, it needed a fair bit of work and I don't think the sellers knew what they had. It doesn't speak quick, but when it does... ahhhh!

 

I'm not willing to sell it yet though. :)

 

Patrick

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*nudge* Bring them all to the Old Palestine festival so that I can check them out...the only other 'tina I've been able to put hands on other than my Jackie was a 20-button Lachenal Anglo just this past weekend, for about five minutes. B)

I am certain there will be plenty of "candy" to entice you at Old Palestine.

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I'm quite fond of my baritone. It has nickel silver reeds in hand cut reed shoes, so must date from 1849 or so. A very mellow instrument if a bit temperamental. It is nice to have the variety. It took a little while for the baritone to come along--it was languishing in Australia and went to Wim Wakker for rehab after I got it. It's better traveled than I am.

 

I have also played a steel reeded Lachenal baritone which was much louder and more brash. I guess part of my point is that a baritone could be an early parlor instrument or a later band instrument and the character of the sound could be quite different.

 

Good luck in your search. I'm going to hang on to mine, though my heirs might not!

 

I have a Wheatstone Baritone, Wakker refurbished, and it's just beautiful! 1851 or so, with brass reeds, rosewood. The bass notes are just so deep and... well you know. I lucked out with an eBay auction from the UK, it needed a fair bit of work and I don't think the sellers knew what they had. It doesn't speak quick, but when it does... ahhhh!

 

I'm not willing to sell it yet though. :)

 

Patrick

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I know that you said "vintage," but I would not rule out the Button Box baritone which is very light.

I assume you are referencing the Morse concertinas they make? I have listened to a couple of them Baritone being played on you tube and they don't have the mellowness of sound that I am looking for. I am certain you are aware that they use accordion type of reeds and they just don't hit the mark for what I am looking for. Do you have one...I realize that you tube does produce high fidelity sound but.....

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I know that you said "vintage," but I would not rule out the Button Box baritone which is very light.

I assume you are referencing the Morse concertinas they make? I have listened to a couple of them Baritone being played on you tube and they don't have the mellowness of sound that I am looking for. I am certain you are aware that they use accordion type of reeds and they just don't hit the mark for what I am looking for. Do you have one...I realize that you tube does produce high fidelity sound but.....

What about adding baffles to sweeten the tone? Anyone have experience with playing a Morse with baffles?

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I know that you said "vintage," but I would not rule out the Button Box baritone which is very light.

I assume you are referencing the Morse concertinas they make? I have listened to a couple of them Baritone being played on you tube and they don't have the mellowness of sound that I am looking for. I am certain you are aware that they use accordion type of reeds and they just don't hit the mark for what I am looking for. Do you have one...I realize that you tube does produce high fidelity sound but.....

What about adding baffles to sweeten the tone? Anyone have experience with playing a Morse with baffles?

Baffle...I am clueless as to what that means/entails. Enlightenment would be appreciated. Thank you.

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Laitch, Thank you this is a very interesting article and now I am anxious to try it on my Lachenal metal ended Edeophone as it seems like it might soften and mellow the tone a bit. Very appreciated. I see you are from Vermont...what type of music (pardon the expression) are you primarily into playing on the concertina?

Stephen

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