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daviseri

What's the best way to keep my instrument at correct humidity leve

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I've taken to using a "Humistat" (with hygrometer) in the case of my large duet during the hot, dry central Texas summers. Otherwise, there can be a bit of air leakage between reed chambers.

 

Hmmm.

 

Sounds like this happens from time to time- air leakage between the chambers. I had this happen in a lachenal- but I think it was due to a crack of some sort. And it's juuuuuuust starting to happen with the Wheatstone, even though I used a dampit.

 

Any idea where I can learn more about dealing with Air leakage between chambers? threads etc? or things to look out for? Ways of dealing with it?

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I have an early 1900s lachenal and had quite a few problems with it until I drilled some holes in a plastic soap container and kept a wet sponge in it (looks like Jody and I think alike). A good source for humidifiers is cigar stores. They like to keep those cigars perfect! I have an oasis tube that I got from a cigar store for my other concertina, which lacks a compartment for a soap dish-sponge arrangement. The problem with that is you have to fill it more often.

 

I've read that using distilled water is best. Any comments on that? Does it really matter? I use distilled if I have it, but mostly use tap lately.

 

I live in New England.

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I have an early 1900s lachenal and had quite a few problems with it until I drilled some holes in a plastic soap container and kept a wet sponge in it (looks like Jody and I think alike). A good source for humidifiers is cigar stores. They like to keep those cigars perfect! I have an oasis tube that I got from a cigar store for my other concertina, which lacks a compartment for a soap dish-sponge arrangement. The problem with that is you have to fill it more often.

 

I've read that using distilled water is best. Any comments on that? Does it really matter? I use distilled if I have it, but mostly use tap lately.

 

I live in New England.

Hi Kate from New England,

 

I think the distilled water is for powered humidifiers where mineral deposits can destroy the unit in a season. The sponge or dampit solution is more forgiving. Tap water is fine for simple evaporating wicks and if your sponge needs washing after a while... no problem.

 

Remembering to refresh my humidifier is the main problem for me. That is why I like my small room plug in humidifier in the display case solution. I only need to fill it up 3 or 4 times per season and when it's low I see the end coming long before it's out of water.

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I use a wick based cool air humidifier to humidify a whole room.

 

This is the type that uses a filter and a fan, and the water wicks up and evaporates out of the filter. The advantage? Tap water is fine. The disadvantage? You have to replace the filters from time to time. Also, they are noisier than an ultrasonic humidifer. Mine has a humidity setting, so I keep the room at 55% humidity or so in the winter and summer. In the fall and spring, it tends towards 60% humidity because that is what the humidity in the region is.

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I've been using a Venta air purifier for two years now and it works quite well. Using a humidistat I make sure the humidity is always between 50-55%. The reason why I love the Venta is that it doesn't require a filter and works with tap water. It's simply using a fan that makes some type of disk stacks rotating in the water, which purifies the air AND humidifies it. Venta suggests to add some special liquid (sold separately of course...) every few weeks, but it's really low maintenance overall.

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I've been using a Venta air purifier for two years now and it works quite well. Using a humidistat I make sure the humidity is always between 50-55%. The reason why I love the Venta is that it doesn't require a filter and works with tap water. It's simply using a fan that makes some type of disk stacks rotating in the water, which purifies the air AND humidifies it. Venta suggests to add some special liquid (sold separately of course...) every few weeks, but it's really low maintenance overall.

 

Wow, that Ventra looks very nice but pricey at $200 for the small model. My Sunpentown Digital Ultrasonic Humidifier with Hygrostat Sensor is less than $50 though it may well not last as long... we'll see.

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I've been using a Venta air purifier for two years now and it works quite well. Using a humidistat I make sure the humidity is always between 50-55%. The reason why I love the Venta is that it doesn't require a filter and works with tap water. It's simply using a fan that makes some type of disk stacks rotating in the water, which purifies the air AND humidifies it. Venta suggests to add some special liquid (sold separately of course...) every few weeks, but it's really low maintenance overall.

 

Wow, that Ventra looks very nice but pricey at $200 for the small model. My Sunpentown Digital Ultrasonic Humidifier with Hygrostat Sensor is less than $50 though it may well not last as long... we'll see.

 

I don't think it's worth buying a Venta just to keep your concertinas humidified. But if you also want an air purifier, that will keep the air quality in your room to a good level, it's worth it in my opinion.

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