Jump to content

Big Songbook Recommendations


JohnMoncton
 Share

Recommended Posts

As a novice to the English Concertina, I'm finding it challenging to find songbooks with more than twenty or so selections.

There's O'Neill's Music of Ireland, and Ye Yaille Chere, but are there any other major compendiums that folks would recommend?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've really enjoyed the tunes shared here in the "Something for the Weekend (in case it rains)" thread. There is a tremendous amount of music available free on line. What kind of music are you looking for? My problem is too many tune books, not too few. Selection is the hard part.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like the Paul Hardy session tune book which is available free on his website. It has about 360 tunes with a variety of styles.

 

Another free online source for the English concertina is tangosite.com/concertina. It includes many styles too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've really enjoyed the tunes shared here in the "Something for the Weekend (in case it rains)" thread. There is a tremendous amount of music available free on line. What kind of music are you looking for? My problem is too many tune books, not too few. Selection is the hard part.

 

I guess I'm interested in having some massive book that can keep me occupied when I'm away from a computer for a long weekend, where I can flip through it and find a bunch of awesome tunes.

Considerations about style are secondary, but diversity is good.

 

It'd be neat to have a lot of standards, like "Happy Birthday," "La Danse De L'Ours," "Squid Jiggin' Ground," etc.

Like "Rolling Stone Sheet Music Classics, Vol 2: 1970s-1990s," is pretty great, although some songs are tricky.

 

Oh, and thank you so much for all your helpful feedback.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about getting a 'Fake Book' one of those huge ringbound tomes that you may have seen the band at a party fumbling through when asked to do a request. I got one at a S/H book sale and it covers all genres and claims to have (I think) 1000 tunes. All you get is melody line, chords, and words, but it's fun to explore.

 

For example, thanks to my fake book I can now tell you that 'Goldfinger' (Bond theme) shows promise as a concertina tune.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Resources in the form of tunebooks:

 

Paul Hardy's session books:

http://www.pghardy.net/concertina/tunebooks/index.html

lots of useful stuff here.

 

Victorian era, from Juliette Daum's web site: This is a book collected in the 1880's and scanned in. I don't know if it has found a permanent home but back in April 2011 Ruediger Asche said

"ok, upload is now complete. There are 2 sets of files: On

http://www.ruediger-asche.de/jdbook/ , there is a collection of 54 pages of tunes, and on http://www.ruediger-...e/jdbook/book2/ there are 28 pages of excercises, scales and so forth. Please let me know if anything is missing, but I don't think so (Alan has strictly numbered the files consecutively)."

 

Lester Bailey's session tune book:

http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=667

 

Lewes session books:

http://www.lewesarmsfolkclub.org/LAFC/LFTunes.html

 

Hornpipes: from a discussion on concertina.net:

http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=13563

 

On concertina.com, a resource you should explore for lots of information:

http://www.concertina.com/english/index.htm

in particular, look at Butler's concertina tutor

 

tangosite.com/concertina, a blog with tunes from the Netherlands:

http://www.tangosite.com/concertina/pub/ec-blog

 

Danny Chapman's page has lots of early music written specifically for EC:

http://www.rowlhouse.co.uk/concertina/music/

 

A complete O'Carolan with links to O'Neill and Allan:

http://www.oldmusicproject.com/occ/tunes.html

 

The tunebook for the Montreal session:

http://music.gordfisch.net/montrealsession/index.html

 

Jack Campan's web page with lots of Scottish material:

http://www.campin.me.uk/

 

Hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Larry; you offered some internet solutions and got this response:

 

I've really enjoyed the tunes shared here in the "Something for the Weekend (in case it rains)" thread. There is a tremendous amount of music available free on line. What kind of music are you looking for? My problem is too many tune books, not too few. Selection is the hard part.
I guess I'm interested in having some massive book that can keep me occupied when I'm away from a computer for a long weekend, where I can flip through it and find a bunch of awesome tunes.Considerations about style are secondary, but diversity is good.It'd be neat to have a lot of standards, like "Happy Birthday," "La Danse De L'Ours," "Squid Jiggin' Ground," etc.Like "Rolling Stone Sheet Music Classics, Vol 2: 1970s-1990s," is pretty great, although some songs are tricky.Oh, and thank you so much for all your helpful feedback.

 

So you give this lot as a follow-up:

 

 

Resources in the form of tunebooks:Paul Hardy's session books:http://www.pghardy.net/concertina/tunebooks/index.htmllots of useful stuff here.Victorian era, from Juliette Daum's web site: This is a book collected in the 1880's and scanned in. I don't know if it has found a permanent home but back in April 2011 Ruediger Asche said "ok, upload is now complete. There are 2 sets of files: On http://www.ruediger-asche.de/jdbook/ , there is a collection of 54 pages of tunes, and on http://www.ruediger-...e/jdbook/book2/ there are 28 pages of excercises, scales and so forth. Please let me know if anything is missing, but I don't think so (Alan has strictly numbered the files consecutively)."Lester Bailey's session tune book:http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=667Lewes session books:http://www.lewesarmsfolkclub.org/LAFC/LFTunes.htmlHornpipes: from a discussion on concertina.net:http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=13563On concertina.com, a resource you should explore for lots of information:http://www.concertina.com/english/index.htmin particular, look at Butler's concertina tutortangosite.com/concertina, a blog with tunes from the Netherlands:http://www.tangosite.com/concertina/pub/ec-blogDanny Chapman's page has lots of early music written specifically for EC:http://www.rowlhouse.co.uk/concertina/music/A complete O'Carolan with links to O'Neill and Allan:http://www.oldmusicproject.com/occ/tunes.htmlThe tunebook for the Montreal session:http://music.gordfisch.net/montrealsession/index.htmlJack Campan's web page with lots of Scottish material:http://www.campin.me.uk/Hope this helps.

 

I felt some might have missed your elegant attempt to circumvent this sad man's obsession with obsolete printed matter and gently guide him into the level and verdant pastures of electronic writings, and that I should, therefore, draw attention to this valiant attempt to save him from his strange, possibly perverted, obsession with the printed word, so others can appreciate it as the laudable and praiseworthy effort it is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

What about getting a 'Fake Book' one of those huge ringbound tomes that you may have seen the band at a party fumbling through when asked to do a request. I got one at a S/H book sale and it covers all genres and claims to have (I think) 1000 tunes. All you get is melody line, chords, and words, but it's fun to explore.

 

For example, thanks to my fake book I can now tell you that 'Goldfinger' (Bond theme) shows promise as a concertina tune.

 

Thanks for the tip, I bought a few Fake Books and they've been an excellent resource. It's amazing that so many TV theme songs and 80's power ballads can fit so naturally on an English Concertina. A fair number don't, but the diverse selection of keys & rhythms have made it easy to develop skills.

 

For other folks looking for Big Songbook Recommendations,

Dave Mallinson's compendiums of Irish session tunes (on books & CDs) are great. 100 Vital Irish Session Tunes seems most appropriate for a beginner, with the other compendiums being a little more aspirational.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Worth mentioning: Peter Barnes's The Barnes Book of English Country Dance Tunes

 

And if you like that, you can move on to: The Barnes Book of English Country Dance Tunes, Vol 2

 

And for good measure: A Little Couple-Dancemusik (also from Peter Barnes).

 

You're from Boston. Perhaps you know Peter. Many there do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Worth mentioning: Peter Barnes's The Barnes Book of English Country Dance Tunes

 

And if you like that, you can move on to: The Barnes Book of English Country Dance Tunes, Vol 2

 

And for good measure: A Little Couple-Dancemusik (also from Peter Barnes).

 

You're from Boston. Perhaps you know Peter. Many there do.

 

That's a terrific suggestion. I picked up both Barnes books, and I'm amazed at the tremendous diversity of rhythms, compared to my Irish tune books. Are there any shortcuts to getting the rhythms right, or Youtube channels with demonstrations? Jamaica is a fine tune, btw.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a terrific suggestion. I picked up both Barnes books, and I'm amazed at the tremendous diversity of rhythms, compared to my Irish tune books. Are there any shortcuts to getting the rhythms right, or Youtube channels with demonstrations? Jamaica is a fine tune, btw.

Thanks. I'm not sure what you mean by "shortcuts." Start with strict counting, and listen to as many sources as possible. Boston is rife with English Country Dancing. Attend one. You don't even have to dance (but please consider it). You might even find one that Peter is playing at with his band, Bare Necessities. They have many CDs available at cdss.org and elsewhere. As for youtube, many English Country Dance groups post videos, usually more focused on the dance thatn the music. Just search for [english country dance xx] (without the brackets), where xx is the name of the dance (generally the same as the name of the tune). You won't find a video for every title, but you will find many. For instance, here is what pops up for jamaica:

It starts in the middle of the tune and you can hardly hear the melody until the recorder picks it up from the top at about 9 seconds in.

 

Another book to look at is Hardcore English. A collection of the kind of tunes popular at English pub sessions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi all,

 

 

Thanks for mentioning my site. Actually, I'm from Flanders, so there's a lot of Flemish stuff on it ;-)

 

http://www.tangosite.com/concertina

 

 

 

Michel

Hurrah == Tangoman comes out from the darkness!

 

swaledale bending\

 

Dear Michel - I sent a few emails to you and Pauline to ask about getting some 'bending' videos from our guitar & Wakker expert -- but came there no response.

 

Can u ask Gerd to do some more examples, on video and put them up here, or on youtube please?

People still don;t believe it is possible but he did it brilliantly on a variety of tinas in Harry's workshop at Grinton.

Tks!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...