Jump to content

How to play 4th intervals on Crane duet


Mary B
 Share

Recommended Posts

I just got a 48 button Lachenal Crane duet yesterday. I have downloaded the Wilton-Bulstrode and Salvation Army tutors, but have not studied them much. After practicing the C scale, I tried playing some of my favorite tunes. When I played "Amazing Grace" I used the fingering method I learned for 5th's on my English concertina (tucking a different finger under or over) whenever there was a 4th interval. I was dismayed at how difficult it was, especially with my short pinky finger. Today I started working through the exercises in the tutors. I noticed that both authors say to jump the same finger up or down to play a 4th interval. I was wondering how the experienced Crane players do this. I really prefer the legato sound one gets by tucking fingers. Is it possible to do this on a Crane?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi there,

 

we had this before - the person you want to refer to primarily is Mr. Crane, aka Kurt Braun (who also offers excellent Skype lessons for Crane duet) - see here for example, post #3 (please ignore my preceding rubbish in the thread):

 

http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=12765

 

 

This here probably is the definite guide to starting fingering on the Crane (also by Kurt):

 

http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=12821

 

welcome to the Crane community! If you haven't done so, why not check here:

 

http://www.craneconcertina.com/

 

And yes, fourths are the achilles heel of Crane duet playing - every system has its problems...

Edited by Ruediger R. Asche
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi there,

 

we had this before - the person you want to refer to primarily is Mr. Crane, aka Kurt Braun (who also offers excellent Skype lessons for Crane duet) - see here for example, post #3 (please ignore my preceding rubbish in the thread):

 

http://www.concertin...showtopic=12765

 

 

This here probably is the definite guide to starting fingering on the Crane (also by Kurt):

 

http://www.concertin...showtopic=12821

 

welcome to the Crane community! If you haven't done so, why not check here:

 

http://www.craneconcertina.com/

 

And yes, fourths are the achilles heel of Crane duet playing - every system has its problems...

 

Maybe I'm wrong but 4ths are the easiest. you just use the same finger on two buttons. For example c/f on the 1st finger, d/g on the 3nd, e/a on the 2nd etc. It does fall down a bit on f/Bb, I'll admit. When I play a C chord from middle c in the RH, it's c(1), e(2), G-c1(3) with the third finger covering both g and c1. Same with G, g(3), b(1), d-g(2).

 

Covering two buttons is a requirment in my book.

 

Hope this helps! Kurt didn't tell me it was a non-starter.

Edited by saguaro_squeezer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe I'm wrong but 4ths are the easiest. you just use the same finger on two buttons.

There's a difference between playing the two notes at once and playing them separately but one right after the other... especially if you want the sequence to be legato. That seems to be what Mary is asking about.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I played "Amazing Grace" I used the fingering method I learned for 5th's on my English concertina (tucking a different finger under or over) whenever there was a 4th interval. I was dismayed at how difficult it was, especially with my short pinky finger.

  • Though not nearly as good on the Crane as I wish I were, I do regularly use different fingers when playing fourths. Sometimes, though, it requires planning ahead, to use an alternate finger (or two, or more) before getting to the fourth-interval, so that I then have a pair of fingers available that can be used comfortably in succession for the notes I want.
  • In which key are you playing Amazing Grace? I.e., what note do you end on? I ask, because using only the notes of the C scale, that melody can still be played in C, F, or G. Alternatively, you could tell us where in the tune you're using your little finger.
  • My fingers are not long, though I doubt they're uncommonly short, either. But my pinkies are much shorter than my other fingers, and I sometimes find it easier to reach some of the higher accidentals -- e.g., the high Bb in the right hand -- with my ring finger than with my pinky. (I realize that's probably not what you were talking about.) But if your fingers are uncommonly short, it might be worth seeing if the hand rests can't be moved slightly closer to the buttons. I've heard from both Maccann and anglo players that even a small shift -- maybe as little as 1/8", or 3 cm -- can make a significant difference.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ruediger, thanks for the links to Kurt's answers. I forgot to do a search to see if the topic had been covered before.

 

 

Saguaro-sqeezer, I have not tried to play chords yet. I am starting with melodies, and trying to play them with the right or left hand, and then in octaves with both hands together (I haven't managed the octaves yet).

 

Jim, I was playing Amazing Grace in G, but I noticed that C uses the same location of notes just one row higher. I used my right pinky on the low D at the beginning of the tune, and my ring finger on the G that follows. I think my problem may be that my pinky is much shorter than my other fingers like yours is. I appreciate your advice about the high B flat. I have not tried any tune in F yet. I should try Amazing Grace in that key since there is no B flat in it, and it would start with an index/middle sequence. I was playing Aura Lee and Shenandoah in G today, and realized that they start with the same fourth interval jump of D to G. I hope I will get better at the pinky/ring combination with more practice, since it happens quite often. Thanks for telling me that fourths need planning ahead. I do not have any problems playing index/middle and middle/ring sequences because my fingers are used to those from the EC. I had no idea that hand rests could be moved. I haven't tried to play anything on the really high notes, so I do not know how well my fingers reach them. Thanks for all your suggestions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had no idea that hand rests could be moved.

It's not a common procedure, as they aren't really designed to be moved, but for someone with unusually short -- or long -- fingers, it can make a significant difference.

 

And not all vintage instruments have them in the same place. The issue was first brought to my attention by a Maccann player, who noticed a difference in his ability to reach certain notes on his two instruments. He measured and found that there was a slight difference in the distance from the bar to the buttons, had the less comfortable one altered to match the more comfortable, and was very pleased with the result.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Mary,

 

Your original instincts, or more, the transfer of what you learned on the English, is the correct path. When doing a melody line, you will need to use a separate finger for each note (not so critical with chords) if you expect to be able to control articulation. It will come with time. The strategy will also become useful with playing chords on the palm (lower) end of the keyboard. Using one finger on two notes can be useful when playing chords, especially on the upper studs.

 

I'm not a fan of fingering suggestions on the earlier (The Salvation Army) tutors, though that is where I started.

 

Good luck with your efforts,

 

Kurt

Edited by Kurt Braun
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I minimise 'out-of-column' fingering as much as possible.

 

If moving a 4th interval in the fourth column on the right-hand I use my 3rd and 4th fingers. As I mainly play in C and G these fingers get a lot of use.

 

If moving a 4th interval in the second or third columns, I usually use the same finger to slide down a 4th, but always use different fingers when going up a 4th. Whether I use the in-column or out-of-column finger first depends on the situation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...