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Lachenal Edeophone For Sale Advice


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Hello Everyone,

 

I've come here to hopefully get some advice regarding selling the concertina shown below. I know very little about these instruments.

It belonged to my wife's father, how long he had it before it was left in storage for the last 40ish years!, we don't know.

 

She took it to a couple of specialist musical instrument shops last week and they both said it was in excellent condition, as it is now and dated it around 1900/10, it's numbered 60388. It appears to be in full working order, no splits in the bellows or fretwork, 2 or 3 keys are slightly sticky and apparently played fine.

 

When she asked about value, they both said around the £3000 mark, as is.

Now, I appreciate it would need a few £100 spending on it to bring it up to top condition and tune.

How realistic is this value?

 

We'd prefer to sell it through this site (not ebay!), so if anyone is interested, please get in touch.

 

I can take as many more full size pictures and post them up as you would like to see.

We're in Manchester (UK) if anyone wants to have a proper look and try it out.

 

Thanks

Andy

 

Edeophone1.jpg

 

Edeophone2.jpg

 

EdophoneBox.jpg

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I think it is fairly well established that serial numbers for Lachenal English concertinas had reached just over 60,000 when they went out of business in the mid 1930s, so this one is definitely a 1930s built concertina. It is also possible that it is one of the instruments that was finished by Wheatstone from parts they acquired with Lachenal's bankrupt stock.

The value will depend on its musical range, whethet it is a tenor treble (lower pitch) or a treble extended up to higher notes. The tenor treble is more sough after and generally worth more.

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Well, for a supposedly late Edeophone, it's interesting to note that it has bowing levers. I thought only pre-1920 English concertinas sometimes had them fitted. My 48 key Edeophone, has the serial number 58856 and has been fairly accurately dated to having been made sometime in 1922, as a reference. As to its value, judging by what Barleycorn is currently asking for them and recent Ebay prices that similar Edeophones have sold for, I would suggest a value somewhere between £2500-£3000, depending on condition.

 

Chris

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Well, for a supposedly late Edeophone, it's interesting to note that it has bowing levers. I thought only pre-1920 English concertinas sometimes had them fitted. My 48 key Edeophone, has the serial number 58856 and has been fairly accurately dated to having been made sometime in 1922, as a reference. As to its value, judging by what Barleycorn is currently asking for them and recent Ebay prices that similar Edeophones have sold for, I would suggest a value somewhere between £2500-£3000, depending on condition.

 

Chris

 

£3000 sounds a little optimistic to me. I have sold two tenor/treble Eddie's recently, and both fetched around £3000. The earlier of the two, 54648, had bowing levers, while the later one, 57942, which may well have been assembled by Wheatstone, had none - make of that what you will. Anyway, I would expect a late treble to make around £2500 restored - and although this one looks pretty good cosmetically, if it has been sitting around for 40 years, it is sure to need some work.

David

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I can take as many more full size pictures and post them up as you would like to see.

We're in Manchester (UK) if anyone wants to have a proper look and try it out.

 

Hi Andy,

 

Depending on whereabouts in Manchester you are, I could come over and see how it plays. (I would like to upgrade my concertina for something like this but probably not until next year at the earliest - so I probably would be able to think of buying it, but would be happy to review it). I'm in Cheshire.

 

Chris

Edited by spindizzy
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  • 2 weeks later...

Sorry if this is a silly question, but are the thin rods that extend out above the thumb straps a standard thing or a modification?

(I am assuming they are to stop the thumb protruding too far through the strap)

 

Cheers, Dave.

Dave

The levers are bowing valves - an optional factory-fit item - which supposedly allowed the concertina to immitate the bowing of a fiddle.

Steve

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  • 3 weeks later...

Was interested in the discussion regarding above mentioned concertina. I also have an english edeophone which I am trying to date. It looks almost identical to the one pictured. Serial # is 58892. Chris, your posting was really helpful, as your's has a serial number which is really close. My concertina was my late grandfother's and it has always been thought that he bought it new when he was 16 (ish). As he was born in 1907, the dates would jive. Could someone please explain to me what is meant by "bowing levers"

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"bowing levers"

An optional factory-fit item - which supposedly allowed the concertina to immitate the bowing of a fiddle.

As never having dealt with those levers, my understanding is that the "bowing effect" should have been created by slowly (and well-controlled) increasing the volume of air passing thru just to immitate the smooth attack of the common violin or viola sound.

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