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PwH

64 key Aeola 29692

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Hi All,

 

I rather fancy this 64 key Aeola 29692 I've seen for sale and wondered if anyone knows anything about it? It looks like it has been heavily used, and the left end is rather badly cracked with at least one key wonky. Asking price is £3295. It's in the ledgers here http://www.horniman....ES/D1P1880S.HTM on May 11th 1923. Very sparse entry, would it be a tenor/treble or something else? Hopefully will get to see and handle it soon. Would this be a fair price in this condition? I suspect a refurb would cost getting on for a Grand?

 

Regards, Peter H.

Edited by PwH

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I would advise you to get in touch with Mr. Chris Algar before you buy that one. He has several TT Aeolas in stock and you can take your time and try them all before you decide...

Edited by conzertino

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It would be a 64key Tennor Treble ! Could be a very nice instrument too.

Good luck,

Geoff.

 

Geoff, I thought Tenor / Trebles were usually 56k while 64k were usually Baritone / Trebles?

 

Cheers,

Dick

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I have seen many 64 key TTs, which extend both up and down. I personally would prefer a 56 key TT ;-)

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...I thought Tenor / Trebles were usually 56k while 64k were usually Baritone / Trebles?

"Usually" is not the same as "always". I have a TT and a BT, both 64-key. And 56-key BT's are also found in the old price lists, and as I recall they appear as the "standard" model (of BT, as well as octave-down baritone), with 64 as an option.

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Dick,

This one (29692) is listed as a model 19a in the Ledgers and so it is designated in the Wheatstone price lists as a Tennor Treble 64key. Running from C below middle C, up four and a half octaves to G above the normal top C of a 48 Treble.

 

I have a 56key Baritone/Treble (which is a Model 14) and this starts at G (on the left hand side) one octave below the lowest note of a 48 Treble and on up four octaves to the highest G of the normal Treble.

 

Both of these leave the normal 48 Treble notes in their usual places (well the thumb straps are effectively shifted downwards a row of buttons on the the BT) which diferentiates them from the Baritones where the same position button is an octave lower.

 

Peter H,

The one thing I might suggest is that the very highest notes of a 64key Tennor Treble might suffer from such a large reed pan. In other words there is too much wood directly attached to these very small reeds which could have a dampening effect, instruments differ though and some could be better than others. Put another way, if you have a need to use these highest notes you would probably get a better tone from a smaller sized instrument, a 56k Extended Treble, which is normally no larger than a 48 Treble.

 

Cheers,

Geoff.

Edited by Geoff Wooff

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Thanks for the info. Geoff, good old Wheatstone, they seemed to cater for every eventuality.

 

I have a 56key Baritone/Treble (which is a Model 14) and this starts at G (on the left hand side) one octave below the lowest note of a 48 Treble and on up four octaves to the highest G of the normal Treble.

Geoff.

 

Ahh, now that sounds like the crème de la crème ... lucky you! B)

 

It's not this one, by any chance, is it? ;)

 

Cheers,

Dick

Edited by Ptarmigan

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Thanks for the info. Geoff, good old Wheatstone, they seemed to cater for every eventuality.

 

I have a 56key Baritone/Treble (which is a Model 14) and this starts at G (on the left hand side) one octave below the lowest note of a 48 Treble and on up four octaves to the highest G of the normal Treble.

Geoff.

 

Ahh, now that sounds like the crème de la crème ... lucky you! B)

 

It's not this one, by any chance, is it? ;)

 

Cheers,

Dick

 

No Dick,

not that one. I attach a picture of mine... Crème de 1927. Great for Classical, Song Accomp or adding some nice harmonies to melodies.This baby will play Jigs and Reels equally well at normal pitch or an octave below which is great fun.

Cheers,

Geoff.

 

PS; Hmmmmm.. looks like I need to do the bushes on this one :rolleyes:

post-8475-0-16606300-1322082651_thumb.jpg

Edited by Geoff Wooff

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