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low-cost tinas refurbed for beginners


Kautilya
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I bet it goes for at least 500 pounds!

 

Well I don't think that's usually his intention (AFAIKnow!) but....

 

See post #28 here from Aug 2010

 

http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=11634&st=18

 

Whoops - I have hit a wrong key and the text has suddenly dropped to about 8 point and is hardly readable... wot have I done?

Only affecting my Cnet view.

Edited by Kautilya
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Kautilya,

I really don't think that concertina (

http://www.ebay.co.u...=item4ab0fb40c8 ) is a cheap German one, it looks to be a Lachenal, or Lachenal made Wheatstone at the very least....the cheap German made ones you mentioned in your referenced post would never(as far as I know)have had serial numbers, or, been made of rosewood...(though a rosewood Lachenal with brass reeds seems a little odd? Anyone???) I just think he came across a 28 button Lachenal that he fixed up a bit(if he did the repairs himself at all) and is re-selling, without a thought as to who is buying it....there is no "buy it now for 100 Lbs." on there, is there? I just think he is like any regular person in this case, he found something good, and he is selling it, let the auction take it where it will...and that concertina will probably go for at least 500 pounds...that doesn't make him a bad guy, or any less of a good guy for earlier good deeds, does it? I don't think so...just a thought, who knows....take care,

Don

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a rosewood Lachenal with brass reeds seems a little odd? Anyone???

The issue here is that people often say "rosewood-ended Lachenals" to refer to what Lachenal themselves called their "Newly-Improved" model which indeed had rosewood ends but is more reliably identified by its complex fretwork. This concertina has simple fretwork so it's probably the more basic model, even though it may have rosewood or perhaps rosewood-stained-mahogany ends. It may be the model listed in this 1895 dealer's catalog as "Anglo-German concertina with yellow metal reeds", Rosewood, 28 keys. The Newly-Improved models (which are usually called "rosewood-ended" today) are listed farther down the page.

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Nice to see "someone" is still keeping up their mission to rescue and refurb the occasional tired tina and offer them at a price young players can afford to get started!

Keep it up! :)

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Wheatstone-Lachenal-28-button-Concertina-number-75067-/320796836040?pt=UK_MusicalInstr_Keyboard_RL&hash=item4ab0fb40c8

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Kautilya,

I really don't think that concertina (

http://www.ebay.co.u...=item4ab0fb40c8 ) is a cheap German one, it looks to be a Lachenal, or Lachenal made Wheatstone at the very least....the cheap German made ones you mentioned in your referenced post would never(as far as I know)have had serial numbers, or, been made of rosewood...(though a rosewood Lachenal with brass reeds seems a little odd? Anyone???) I just think he came across a 28 button Lachenal that he fixed up a bit(if he did the repairs himself at all) and is re-selling, without a thought as to who is buying it....there is no "buy it now for 100 Lbs." on there, is there? I just think he is like any regular person in this case, he found something good, and he is selling it, let the auction take it where it will...and that concertina will probably go for at least 500 pounds...that doesn't make him a bad guy, or any less of a good guy for earlier good deeds, does it? I don't think so...just a thought, who knows....take care,

Don

Whoops = this is getting too confabulating!

I did not mean Bryanclocks only handled German ones (with the wooden levers!) - it was a general point I made in August 2010 about his stated approach/philosophy of regularly rescuing stuff and himself (yes) fixing em up to keep them alive. Let's still hope this 'better' one ends up in the hands of a young beginner at a reasonable price, unless my innocent reference to it and remark about this tina Samaritan means it gets pushed beyond their reach. But then, he will have a few quid more to rescue others for more young beginners. Simples!

Take care.

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Nice to see "someone" is still keeping up their mission to rescue and refurb the occasional tired tina and offer them at a price young players can afford to get started!

Keep it up! :)

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Wheatstone-Lachenal-28-button-Concertina-number-75067-/320796836040?pt=UK_MusicalInstr_Keyboard_RL&hash=item4ab0fb40c8

Tk u Stephen and I do agree with you and Pauline.

 

http://www.concertina.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=13468&pid=130026&st=0entry130026

 

BTW I must confess to having a few German wooden lever jobs as well as a few battered 'better' ones in various states of dis-ongoing=repair with the idea that young beginners could use em to get going on.

 

It's also why I usally carry half a dozen v cheap but v useable, new, Swan harmonicas (chromatics even with slides!)in my bag which I dole out to get a group of instrumentless, young, foot-tapping watchers to have a go on. And if it clicks then they get to keep them in the hope they will carry on trying and learning and be ready for an Anglo-and-or--German. Perhaps I am dumb but there u go. :blink: :blink:

 

Further, over the years I have found that kids with general learning difficulties often suddenly shine through music -- and one such offspring of a neighbour recently certainly got great fun from one of my cheapo Chinese harmonicas(they are made in the Shanghai factory and I have been buying them for a decade and more).

 

I have to admit that I have no idea for most of them whether the ploy works as you meet families with the kids at some event and never see them again = maybe the parents are cursing me because of the subsequent noise :rolleyes:

 

I should say that the small cheap "harp" mouth organs (usually in C) at Lidl and Aldi are not so good or easy for a starter and I wonder if the difficulty of getting a good tune out of them unskilled may in fact put em off. :lol:

 

What we need now is someone with pots of dosh to hand out free Jeffries at sessions to the under-21s...........

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Nice to see "someone" is still keeping up their mission to rescue and refurb the occasional tired tina and offer them at a price young players can afford to get started!

Keep it up! :)

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Wheatstone-Lachenal-28-button-Concertina-number-75067-/320796836040?pt=UK_MusicalInstr_Keyboard_RL&hash=item4ab0fb40c8

 

alas, no international shipping ..

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Kautila,

I wasn't remotely aware of your previous posting about Bryanclocks and his good works, most admirable, I might say....maybe that is why he won't ship internationally, to keep the price down? At this time,(with the clock ticking), the price is only up to 175 lbs., which I am surprised at, but there are still five hours to go....I might have to eat my hat, or, my lachenal, or at the very least, my words! Anyway, on to your other situation, or should I mention it elsewhere?

One thing that I am aware of to bring musical instruments to young people who may not be able to afford them is the music clearinghouse department of the Joe "Banjo" Burke festival/committee,

http://joebanjoburke.org/gpage5.html

They accept instruments for donation, and people looking for instruments can contact them saying they are in need of one....Father Charlie Coen, one of America's great Irish Concertina players, has donated several instruments to this cause...Handing out cheap harmonicas is nice, and I myself over the years have handed out many tin whistles to children who were interested...and the same goes, wondering what the parents thought of it.???

Over the last 25-30 years, home made, accoustic music in all forms has been steadily growing in interest and participation, as evidenced by the dozens, if not hundreds, of new musical instrument makers, from guitars, whistles, and banjo's, all the way through to concertinas, this last 30 years has been a great renaissance for accoustic music and the instruments that make it. One thing I noticed back in the 80's was that Elderly Instruments in Lansing, Michigan, USA, has been promoting ukeleles as the "up and coming thing", or, the "new revival instrument", or something to that effect for many years. And what has happened(not necessarily because of them, but, it has happened!) is that right now there is a big resurgence in interest in the ukelele, with lots of people making, selling, and I suppose, playing them, which is a good thing...The same needs to be done for

the concertina. Great Britain has a ukelele orchestra, and they made a really cool recording of the theme song of "the good, the bad, and the Ugly"

Couldn't something similar be done with/for, the concertina? It would be a smash, and it would get people's interests going...something to think about, eh? Anyway, hope all is well, take care,

Don

 

PS-I apologize for any spelling errors, it is late, and there is something wrong with the spell check!(or, maybe me!)

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Kautila,

I wasn't remotely aware of your previous posting about Bryanclocks and his good works, most admirable, I might say....maybe that is why he won't ship internationally, to keep the price down? At this time,(with the clock ticking), the price is only up to 175 lbs., which I am surprised at, but there are still five hours to go....I might have to eat my hat, or, my lachenal, or at the very least, my words! Anyway, on to your other situation, or should I mention it elsewhere?

One thing that I am aware of to bring musical instruments to young people who may not be able to afford them is the music clearinghouse department of the Joe "Banjo" Burke festival/committee,

http://joebanjoburke.org/gpage5.html

They accept instruments for donation, and people looking for instruments can contact them saying they are in need of one....Father Charlie Coen, one of America's great Irish Concertina players, has donated several instruments to this cause...Handing out cheap harmonicas is nice, and I myself over the years have handed out many tin whistles to children who were interested...and the same goes, wondering what the parents thought of it.???

Over the last 25-30 years, home made, accoustic music in all forms has been steadily growing in interest and participation, as evidenced by the dozens, if not hundreds, of new musical instrument makers, from guitars, whistles, and banjo's, all the way through to concertinas, this last 30 years has been a great renaissance for accoustic music and the instruments that make it. One thing I noticed back in the 80's was that Elderly Instruments in Lansing, Michigan, USA, has been promoting ukeleles as the "up and coming thing", or, the "new revival instrument", or something to that effect for many years. And what has happened(not necessarily because of them, but, it has happened!) is that right now there is a big resurgence in interest in the ukelele, with lots of people making, selling, and I suppose, playing them, which is a good thing...The same needs to be done for

the concertina. Great Britain has a ukelele orchestra, and they made a really cool recording of the theme song of "the good, the bad, and the Ugly"

Couldn't something similar be done with/for, the concertina? It would be a smash, and it would get people's interests going...something to think about, eh? Anyway, hope all is well, take care,

Don

 

PS-I apologize for any spelling errors, it is late, and there is something wrong with the spell check!(or, maybe me!)

nema problema!

" It would be a smash, and it would get people's interests going...something to think about, eh? ............"

 

Duets at dawn! On the step's of St Paul's with a massed band of seconds with Mcannons, Anglos, English etc.

 

Just recently - George Formby and the Uke.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b016fpz0

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  • 2 weeks later...

Kautila,

I wasn't remotely aware of your previous posting about Bryanclocks and his good works, most admirable, I might say....maybe that is why he won't ship internationally, to keep the price down? At this time,(with the clock ticking), the price is only up to 175 lbs., which I am surprised at, but there are still five hours to go....I might have to eat my hat, or, my lachenal, or at the very least, my words! Anyway, on to your other situation, or should I mention it elsewhere?

One thing that I am aware of to bring musical instruments to young people who may not be able to afford them is the music clearinghouse department of the Joe "Banjo" Burke festival/committee,

http://joebanjoburke.org/gpage5.html

They accept instruments for donation, and people looking for instruments can contact them saying they are in need of one....Father Charlie Coen, one of America's great Irish Concertina players, has donated several instruments to this cause...Handing out cheap harmonicas is nice, and I myself over the years have handed out many tin whistles to children who were interested...and the same goes, wondering what the parents thought of it.???

Over the last 25-30 years, home made, accoustic music in all forms has been steadily growing in interest and participation, as evidenced by the dozens, if not hundreds, of new musical instrument makers, from guitars, whistles, and banjo's, all the way through to concertinas, this last 30 years has been a great renaissance for accoustic music and the instruments that make it. One thing I noticed back in the 80's was that Elderly Instruments in Lansing, Michigan, USA, has been promoting ukeleles as the "up and coming thing", or, the "new revival instrument", or something to that effect for many years. And what has happened(not necessarily because of them, but, it has happened!) is that right now there is a big resurgence in interest in the ukelele, with lots of people making, selling, and I suppose, playing them, which is a good thing...The same needs to be done for

the concertina. Great Britain has a ukelele orchestra, and they made a really cool recording of the theme song of "the good, the bad, and the Ugly"

Couldn't something similar be done with/for, the concertina? It would be a smash, and it would get people's interests going...something to think about, eh? Anyway, hope all is well, take care,

Don

 

PS-I apologize for any spelling errors, it is late, and there is something wrong with the spell check!(or, maybe me!)

nema problema!

" It would be a smash, and it would get people's interests going...something to think about, eh? ............"

 

Duets at dawn! On the step's of St Paul's with a massed band of seconds with Mcannons, Anglos, English etc.

 

Just recently - George Formby and the Uke.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b016fpz0

 

No Kautila, I don't think that is quite what I meant....On another note, I did see that I was off by nearly 100 Lbs.,on the BryanClocks auction that started this topic. I don't know if that was due to the economy, the fact that is wasn't for sale outside of Great Britain, or what, but I was very surprised at how low that concertina sold for....what surprised me even more was this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/130607579820?ssPageName=STRK:MEDWX:IT this is a 24 button, steel reeded, Rosewood ended Lachenal, which should have gone for at least 400-450 USD, but only sold for 305 USD...Two years ago I bought(after several years of trying) a 20 button Rosewood ended, steel reeded Lachenal on ebay, and paid 355 USD or so.... Things are strange right now....only thing to do is to" keep squeezing!"

Don

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http://www.ebay.com/itm/130607579820?ssPageName=STRK:MEDWX:IT this is a 24 button, steel reeded, Rosewood ended Lachenal, which should have gone for at least 400-450 USD, but only sold for 305 USD...Two years ago I bought(after several years of trying) a 20 button Rosewood ended, steel reeded Lachenal on ebay, and paid 355 USD or so.... Things are strange right now....only thing to do is to" keep squeezing!"

Don

 

I was watching that one as well, but was put off by the condition of the bellows, possibly stuck key, and lack of mention of tuning of reeds to modern pitch. I'm a pretty much complete novice at concertinas though, just looking to upgrade my current Hohner D40. Right now I'm more into playing and repair of antique simple system flutes (often called, inaccurately, Irish flutes). I'm a little flute "rich" at the moment, so if anyone is interested in a flute for concertina trade... I've got a nice 6-key, cocus Metzler that isn't getting much play time now.

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