Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
MarkvN

Scottish, Irish and English music at the NLS

Recommended Posts

I’m not sure if this collection has featured here before; if so, I guess it’s worth a second mention. The National Library of Scotland has put its collection of traditional music on the internet, and it’s a treasure trove – more than 200 volumes digitised!

http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=collection%3Anlsmusic&sort=-publicdate&page=1

 

And when you’re at it, also have a look at a set of rare Dutch prints from the mid-17th century in their collection, the Fluyten Lusthof by recorder player van Eyck, and the second volume of ’t Uitnement Kabinet: http://www.archive.org/details/acompositemusicv02rugg.

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The National Library of Scotland has put its collection of traditional music on the internet, and it’s a treasure trove – more than 200 volumes digitised!

http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=collection%3Anlsmusic&sort=-publicdate&page=1

As if I didn't have enough in the queue already! :ph34r: ;)

 

And when you’re at it, also have a look at a set of rare Dutch prints from the mid-17th century in their collection, the Fluyten Lusthof by recorder player van Eyck, and the second volume of ’t Uitnement Kabinet: http://www.archive.org/details/acompositemusicv02rugg.

An intriguing coincidence. Many years ago I picked up second hand a more modern edition of Fluyten Lusthof, in modern notation and a somewhat larger paperback format. At the time my reaction when I read through a number of the pieces was more "interesting" than "exciting", so I just stored it away. I think I should now find where I put it and see if my opinion has changed. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Many years ago I picked up second hand a more modern edition of Fluyten Lusthof, in modern notation and a somewhat larger paperback format. At the time my reaction when I read through a number of the pieces was more "interesting" than "exciting", so I just stored it away. I think I should now find where I put it and see if my opinion has changed. B)

 

Der Fluyten Lusthof and T Uitnement Kabinet are not your normal folk music fare. The first one is 'obligatory' stuff for Renaissance recorder players. Often based on popular folk tunes of the day, it builds variations by 'breaking up' the notes - an often used technique of the time, but not everyones cup of tea.

 

T Uitnement Kabinet, though closely related to the Fluyten Lusthof, containes more classical oriented material (though at the time the distinction between folk and classical may have been different or non-existent). That said, much of it is in a two-part, 8 (or 16) bars per part structure, typical of the music of 'speelmannen' or 'speellieden' (Dutch). (Not sure about the English translation: minstrel and troubadour seem too infer a different age). If Turlough O'Carolan is considered appropriate for folk music, why not this repertoire...?

 

I find it especially interesting to see how the dance culture changes from the 17th to the 18th century: in T Uitnement Kabinet, it's all (courtly) pavanes, galliardes, sarabanden, couranten, etc.

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...