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Help with a Crabb Anglo


AndyNT
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Hi,

 

My first post on the forum, as I tend to frequent the 'other' one, so hi to Melnet friends :)

 

I'm looking for information on history of my C/G Crabb Anglo, purchased many many years ago from Chris Algar who had obviously done some restoration work on it - new bellows, straps etc.

 

I've looked at the various items and images about Crabbs on the site, and touched some beautiful ones. But this one looks more like a 'Ford' than a 'Bentley'.

 

On LH, it is stamped Crabb 14141 Made in England . On the RH, H Crabb & Son Makers London N1

 

I've attached a couple of images - couldn't manage close ups of stamps but both oval.

IMG_1025.jpg

IMG_1026.jpg

IMG_1027.jpg

 

As you can see, it has been used! Could it have been made for Salvation Army perhaps?

 

Many thanks,

 

Andy

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Hi,

 

My first post on the forum, as I tend to frequent the 'other' one, so hi to Melnet friends :)

 

I'm looking for information on history of my C/G Crabb Anglo, purchased many many years ago from Chris Algar who had obviously done some restoration work on it - new bellows, straps etc.

 

I've looked at the various items and images about Crabbs on the site, and touched some beautiful ones. But this one looks more like a 'Ford' than a 'Bentley'.

 

On LH, it is stamped Crabb 14141 Made in England . On the RH, H Crabb & Son Makers London N1

 

I've attached a couple of images - couldn't manage close ups of stamps but both oval.

 

IMG_1025.jpg

IMG_1026.jpg

IMG_1027.jpg

 

As you can see, it has been used! Could it have been made for Salvation Army perhaps?

 

Many thanks,

 

Andy

 

 

Hi Andy,

 

14141 was made as one of a batch of 10 in 1960 made by my father and brother.

 

Made to an order of a wholesaler, and probably intended for eventual export, these instruments were made down to a price. To retain quality of reedwork, cost savings were limited mainly to fitting aluminium end plates with simple fretwork and omitting the veneers to the sides of the end boxes.

 

1960, being just before the first revival of the concertina, was still in the period of very little interest and to stay in business, what was made, although not always to the makers preference, had to conform to what was dictated by the market/customer.

 

I doubt if made for Salvation Army as by 1960 most work for them was for English and Duet instruments.

 

Picture of another from the same actual batch restored and how 14141 would have looked when made.

Note original strap adjustment on these models, another cost saving.

 

 

Click on picture to enlarge

 

Geoff C

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  • 3 years later...

Now the proud owner of the above - needs a little more work to one sticky key, one end bolt to replace (with a proper one, not a countersunk head screw...) and some cosmetic attention. New bridle leather straps made. Sounds great, even with me driving it. Thanks for the background Geoff - I went to the shop once in the sixties. I only wish I'd been able to buy one then!

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