Jump to content

SEEK ADVICE IS THIS A BARITONE OR TENOR OR


StephenTx
 Share

Recommended Posts

HI StepehnTx, welcome to c.net.

 

Is this the Stagi that you mention in your other thread about the treble concertina that you bought? I think you mentioned that the lowest note was a C, which makes it a Tenor.

 

Button Box has a good description of the various Stagi concetinas on their website http://www.buttonbox.com/other-concertinas.html . If you could get the model number of the concertina in the picture you would know wxactly what you're looking at. I couldn't make out any numbers from the picture.

 

When I started playing, I too favoured the baritone and started on a Concertina Connection Jack. Based on opinions from this forum. I also had a brief fling with a Morse Albion but went to the dark side with Crane Duet.

 

Check out the Button Box site for Stagi descriptions .... and enjoy your squeezing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My friends can anyone tell me whether this is a Baritone, Tenor or Treble concertina. what do all the numbrs stand for? Any words of wisdom about this model of concertina? Thank you so much.

Stephen

48 button /

96 reeds /

8 folder Leather bellows?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...and in case you're thinking "well, dagnabbit, I said it was a Hohner in the subhead, why's he rabbiting on about Stagis?" I believe some Hohner concertinas are in fact re-badged Stagis. The numbers: 48 buttons, 96 reeds, no idea what 8L means. It might indicate its range; if not, there's nothing here to tell us whether it's a baritone or a tenor.

 

Too late anyway, if it's this one. Unless, of course, you're the winning bidder...

 

jdms

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My friends can anyone tell me whether this is a Baritone, Tenor or Treble concertina. what do all the numbrs stand for? Any words of wisdom about this model of concertina? Thank you so much.

Stephen

 

No it is a Hohner International C 48/96/8L, I found it on an English site I know the what the 48 and the 8L represents but not the 96. I looked on the Hohner site and could not identify it.

 

Are you a tenor and used a baritone?

 

Thank you so much,

Stephen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My friends can anyone tell me whether this is a Baritone, Tenor or Treble concertina. what do all the numbrs stand for? Any words of wisdom about this model of concertina? Thank you so much.

Stephen

48 button /

96 reeds /

8 folder Leather bellows?

 

Ah thank you ... Damn you all are great. Now I need a good but cost effective entry Tenor. From what I have read there is a debate as to whether an English 48 or a duet is the best for accompaniment... I kind of like the reasoning for the English what do you think? Is the duet much easier to learn to play.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My friends can anyone tell me whether this is a Baritone, Tenor or Treble concertina. what do all the numbrs stand for? Any words of wisdom about this model of concertina? Thank you so much.

Stephen

 

 

Rod, Thank you. You mentioned on starting out on the Jack and I have been bouncing this around. Do you play a 48 key now and was the transition difficult in terms of relearning the keying? I need to do some research on the Jack as I don't know if it performs like the English one note per key or a different on push and pull. and how the keys are arranged. I have been communicating with Bob Tendrow (sp) and I am sure he will fill me in plus I can go to the site. Rod, are you tenor? Were you a musician when you started playing...how long did it take you, I know it is heavily dependennt on practicing but I plan on at least an hour a day. Thanks Stephen and thank you for the welcome

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stephen,

 

The Jack is a Baritone EC and the Jackie (it's sister) is a treble English Concertina (EC). Both finger just like the Lachenal that you won (push and pull the same note). Just fewer buttons. Transitioning from the Jack to a more complete EC (your Lachenal or another one) is no big deal. Just some of those extra repeated notes that make chromatic scales easier. :lol:

 

I was a band director in my first life so learned how to make noise on various instruments of the same families (woodwind, string, brass, percussion). I'd never played concertina and always wanted to. I didn't easily grasp the Anglo because I'd never played harmonica. My attempts at Melodeon suffered a similar fate. EC was the best place for me to start because I also hadn't really played 2 handed instruments (piano) very much.

 

Am I a tenor. For short stretches on a good day. Otherwise a baritone. I hadn't really played anything in about 30 years when I got the bug and started concertina ... then Pedal Harp (again) ... then String Bass (again). I also tried other free-reed instruments but decided I'd better stick with one type and one fingering for the tme being. I have 3 Crane duet concertinas, a 35-key Lachenal, 55-key Wheatstone and 69-key Crabb. It's funny, I tried to play a Bass EC at a Festival this spring and have almost compeletely forgotten my EC fingerings.

 

I've been at this for just at 2 years and can pick out tunes fairly well ... one handed, I don't have too many problems ... but am still fighting the melody / accompaniment battle.

 

Where are you in TX? I know that it's a bit far from AZ but there are quite a few concertina players in TX. I met a number at the Palestine Old Time Music Festival this spring ... beginners and experts. It's the last weekend in March and I'll send you the info if you're interested.

 

Please let me know if I can help.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stephen,

 

The Jack is a Baritone EC and the Jackie (it's sister) is a treble English Concertina (EC). Both finger just like the Lachenal that you won (push and pull the same note). Just fewer buttons. Transitioning from the Jack to a more complete EC (your Lachenal or another one) is no big deal. Just some of those extra repeated notes that make chromatic scales easier. :lol:

 

I was a band director in my first life so learned how to make noise on various instruments of the same families (woodwind, string, brass, percussion). I'd never played concertina and always wanted to. I didn't easily grasp the Anglo because I'd never played harmonica. My attempts at Melodeon suffered a similar fate. EC was the best place for me to start because I also hadn't really played 2 handed instruments (piano) very much.

 

Am I a tenor. For short stretches on a good day. Otherwise a baritone. I hadn't really played anything in about 30 years when I got the bug and started concertina ... then Pedal Harp (again) ... then String Bass (again). I also tried other free-reed instruments but decided I'd better stick with one type and one fingering for the tme being. I have 3 Crane duet concertinas, a 35-key Lachenal, 55-key Wheatstone and 69-key Crabb. It's funny, I tried to play a Bass EC at a Festival this spring and have almost compeletely forgotten my EC fingerings.

 

I've been at this for just at 2 years and can pick out tunes fairly well ... one handed, I don't have too many problems ... but am still fighting the melody / accompaniment battle.

 

Where are you in TX? I know that it's a bit far from AZ but there are quite a few concertina players in TX. I met a number at the Palestine Old Time Music Festival this spring ... beginners and experts. It's the last weekend in March and I'll send you the info if you're interested.

 

Please let me know if I can help.

Thank you so much this is very helpful. Yes please send me the information about the festival.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

this all reminds me to ask....i've read that long thread about different kinds of ec voicing---i see it says a simple "Tenor" concertina goes down to the C below middle c on the low end, and up to "F" on the high end, but which F? The F above the C above middle C, or the F above "high C"?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

this all reminds me to ask....i've read that long thread about different kinds of ec voicing---i see it says a simple "Tenor" concertina goes down to the C below middle c on the low end, and up to "F" on the high end, but which F? The F above the C above middle C, or the F above "high C"?

If it's a 48-button English, it has a range of 3½ octaves.

If it's a "tenor" (or "tenor-treble" in the old Wheatstone naming convention), the bottom note is an octave below middle C.

 

So the F is the one 2½ octaves above middle C.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi, are you still looking for a starter tenor? if you scroll down on this linked page from Lark in the Morning's concertina listings, there is a photo-less listing for a cosmetically damaged stagi tenor. no clue if the listing is current, and Lark is closed during their august Lark Camp hoedown, but you could inquire when the mother ship reopens....http://www.larkinam.com/Concertinas.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...