Jump to content

Double or triple fingers to give repeat notes?


Recommended Posts

I am working on Rolling in the Ryegrass in D on C/G anglo.and there is a 3 note triplet all on E possible

 

On melodeon (button accordion) it is common to use several fingers on the same button to get a same note triplet

 

Does anyone here do that or is it easier to do a shake or a slap (tap the plate) triplet?Or do you do a staccato repeat on the button. I use quite a few cuts (grace notes , eg ded or gbg with the bellows in teh same direction but one note triplets are sometimes found.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One way of doing it is by keeping the note depressed and using the bellows to create a triplet. Like a bellows shake but on the push.(takes gentle pressure on the bellows ) It takes a bit of practice , I think Mary McNamara uses this principle,not certain, but sounds like it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to admit that I have never really developed the technique of multiple fingers on the same key for speed. However, I do remember learning the technique when briefly a student of the piano. On the piano I had the benefit of a teacher. I've always thought that someday I'd run across a passage where I'd need it and then take the time to get the technique under my fingers. If it ever happens, I bet that I'll not regret taking the time to practice it. If you learn it, I'd like to know of your experiences.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depending on which E you refer to. A low E on the C row, I would lightly touch the first button rt hand c with second finger rt hand in a glancing blow followed by same sliding motion with first finger rt hand, effectively giving the following sequence. E-c-c-E. More times than not, I would also use all push on rt hand, of e, c, the to E on left. Sequence is

E-e-c-E. Now taste becomes an important part of doing either. Again if a low E on the C row, I am as likely to create a double stop by pressing the E and either an octave down on the third row, or a low B on the G row. If you mean the higher octave e, here is my choice. I find more power on the pull e of the g row. I either grace with the f# ( first finger rt hand), or if time permits I also use a pull high g from the third row ( using second finger rt hand) followed by f#, the the e. The sequence is e-g-f#-e. On a jig the rhythm allows the long roll nicely. Just my take on ornaments.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...