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Chris Ghent

Concertina In New Zealand

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I was reading a mag from home, the "New Zealand Listener" and reading an historical story when a picture suddenly jumped out at me. Titled, "troops assembling for the march to Parihaka 1881", I'm sure you will spot the same thing I did. I think it is an anglo because of the wrist strap, and imagine it is a 20 key without too much information. With the printer's screen through the picture, it is hard to make out much detail.

 

The picture was taken at an important NZ historical moment. The troops (British Imperial) were preparing for what they assumed would be a battle with rebel Maori. They were in fact met at Parihaka by children singing and bread baked for them. This particular tribe were into passive resistance and arms were not allowed in the village. It has been said (probably apocryphal but it is a nice touch) Gandhi heard the Parihaka story and was inspired by it. But the army were on a mission to confiscate land and although they were hoping to find resistance to use as an excuse they sacked the village anyway and imprisoned the chiefs.

 

It seems one man was carrying a concertina. It would be great to know his repertoire. Looks like a Lachenal to me, anyone have an idea?

 

Chris

 

Don't know why the picture looks so vertically stretched below but if you click on it the larger picture is OK. Edited to add this comment.

post-9-1089212317.jpg

Edited by Chris Ghent

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I think it is an anglo because of the wrist strap,....

Chris, does the word "wrist" mean something different in your dialect of English than in mine? :unsure:

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I think it is an anglo because of the wrist strap,....

Chris, does the word "wrist" mean something different in your dialect of English than in mine? :unsure:

They are frequently called "wrist straps" even though they actually cross the back of the hand (above the thumb).

 

In Latin, "wrist" is "carpus." The bones of the wrist are the carpal bones, and the bones of this part of the hand are the metacarpal bones.

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I think it is an anglo because of the wrist strap,....
Chris, does the word "wrist" mean something different in your dialect of English than in mine? :unsure:
They are frequently called "wrist straps" even though they actually cross the back of the hand (above the thumb).

Yep. And on eBay, concertinas are often described incorrectly.

..... Doesn't make it right.

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FOLKS: for what it's worth -- perhaps nothing: my Wheatstone no. 5899, a brass-reeded, meantone-tuned, English, which seems to have been purchased for the first time by William Peel, third son of the Prime Minister, on 5 March 1856, was rescued from a Christchurch antique shop about six or seven years ago...........William Peel, we might note, had close ties to NZ.............Allan

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Also, for what it is worth, my Jeffries English was purchased in the late 1970’s by a friend from a NZ Salvation Army family. There seem to only be 2 such creatures known.

 

New Zealand’s concertina history might be a very interesting research project.

 

Dan Madden

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