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Left hand harmony on anglo


Sue W
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Hi everyone,

I could do with a little help and advice. I'm teaching myself to play English traditional music on a G/D anglo. So far I can play several tunes (melody only) on the right hand. I would like to add some left hand harmony but I'm unsure where to begin. I should say that I've come to music playing quite late in life and I'm having to learn 'music' as well as the instrument. I've looked at various books, all written for c/g anglo, and had a go at translating them for my instrument, but I'm still not sure where to start. Should I try playing in parallel octaves? should I be putting a baseline in , rather than chords - and if so what? I really need to start with something simple; if it's too complicated I will only become frustrated at my inability to make it work. I also wondered if anyone had any suggestions for exercises to get the left hand working along with the right hand. I'm happy to work at stuff everyday but I don't know what to try. It can be quite hard to make progress when you don't know if what you are doing will end up being helpful or a journey up a blind alley.

Look forward to your ideas.

Thanks. Sue

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Hallo Sue

Have a look at my free downloadable Anglo Tutor on concertinaman.com

It is recorded for a CG Anglo but just use the same fingering techniques and you will find it fairly simple on your GD. The early exercises are the most important, you will find them boring but if you move on to the tunes too quickly you will start to find it difficult to progress. The dots are also available there on the site.

If you hit difficulties feel free to contact me here for further info.

If you wish to play along with the music there are a number of free downloads available. See my recent posting regarding ITM A Favour you will be able to reduce the speed of the music to get it in tune with your instrument.

Al

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Hallo Sue

Have a look at my free downloadable Anglo Tutor on concertinaman.com

It is recorded for a CG Anglo but just use the same fingering techniques and you will find it fairly simple on your GD. The early exercises are the most important, you will find them boring but if you move on to the tunes too quickly you will start to find it difficult to progress. The dots are also available there on the site.

If you hit difficulties feel free to contact me here for further info.

If you wish to play along with the music there are a number of free downloads available. See my recent posting regarding ITM A Favour you will be able to reduce the speed of the music to get it in tune with your instrument.

Al

Hi Alan,

Thanks for this. I've just looked at your site but I'm afraid I can't work out what I have to do to download your tutor. Maybe I'm not looking in the right place.

Sue

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Hallo Sue

Have a look at my free downloadable Anglo Tutor on concertinaman.com

It is recorded for a CG Anglo but just use the same fingering techniques and you will find it fairly simple on your GD. The early exercises are the most important, you will find them boring but if you move on to the tunes too quickly you will start to find it difficult to progress. The dots are also available there on the site.

If you hit difficulties feel free to contact me here for further info.

If you wish to play along with the music there are a number of free downloads available. See my recent posting regarding ITM A Favour you will be able to reduce the speed of the music to get it in tune with your instrument.

Al

Hi Alan,

Thanks for this. I've just looked at your site but I'm afraid I can't work out what I have to do to download your tutor. Maybe I'm not looking in the right place.

Sue

Sue at the top of the page click on Concertina Tutorial ,then click the same detail in italic a whole page of MP3s will come up and you play each MP3 in turn down the page to get all the details. I will have to get my Son to increase the size of place to click as you are not the first to have difficulties with this and the sheet music.

Al

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Hi everyone,

I could do with a little help and advice. I'm teaching myself to play English traditional music on a G/D anglo. So far I can play several tunes (melody only) on the right hand. I would like to add some left hand harmony but I'm unsure where to begin. I should say that I've come to music playing quite late in life and I'm having to learn 'music' as well as the instrument. I've looked at various books, all written for c/g anglo, and had a go at translating them for my instrument, but I'm still not sure where to start. Should I try playing in parallel octaves? should I be putting a baseline in , rather than chords - and if so what? I really need to start with something simple; if it's too complicated I will only become frustrated at my inability to make it work. I also wondered if anyone had any suggestions for exercises to get the left hand working along with the right hand. I'm happy to work at stuff everyday but I don't know what to try. It can be quite hard to make progress when you don't know if what you are doing will end up being helpful or a journey up a blind alley.

Look forward to your ideas.

Thanks. Sue

 

 

One tip I've passed on to a lot of newbies that helped me: learn to play tunes in octaves - playing the melody simultaneously on right and left hands, as far as possible. That will give you a good feel for the way the two sides of the anglo operate. Then, gradually, start adding chords and harmony notes. Do that with a simple tune like Shepherd's Hey, gradually adding complexity to your left hand.

 

 

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Hi Sue W,

Or try the tutorial on John Kirkpatrick's website: http://www.johnkirkp...k/wr_Anglo1.asp (part 3 in particular), or "Faking it" by Roger Digby: http://www.concertin...aking/index.htm.

Oh, and I almost forgot to add the wonderfull study of Dan Worrall on William Kimber: http://www.angloconcertina.org/Kimber.html.

That should keep you busy for a while...

Cheers,

Mark

 

edited to add Kimber.

Edited by MarkvN
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Hi Sue

I have been playing for about four months although I already played the melodeon. I definately found it useful to practice playing ocataves. Then play around with changes on the left hand like playing one button down (or up). Then when the tune in your right hand requires a crotchet or minim play a little run with the left hand. You can also play two buttons on the left, especially the octave note and the button above it to give you a fifth (often known as a modal chord) This is great for English traditional music. Definately worth reading the three articles on John Kirkpatrick's website.

Good Luck !

Matt

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Hi everyone,

I could do with a little help and advice. I'm teaching myself to play English traditional music on a G/D anglo. So far I can play several tunes (melody only) on the right hand. I would like to add some left hand harmony but I'm unsure where to begin. I should say that I've come to music playing quite late in life and I'm having to learn 'music' as well as the instrument. I've looked at various books, all written for c/g anglo, and had a go at translating them for my instrument, but I'm still not sure where to start. Should I try playing in parallel octaves? should I be putting a baseline in , rather than chords - and if so what? I really need to start with something simple; if it's too complicated I will only become frustrated at my inability to make it work. I also wondered if anyone had any suggestions for exercises to get the left hand working along with the right hand. I'm happy to work at stuff everyday but I don't know what to try. It can be quite hard to make progress when you don't know if what you are doing will end up being helpful or a journey up a blind alley.

Look forward to your ideas.

Thanks. Sue

 

Sue, The Anglo is a relatively simple musical instrument. Never under estimate the value of trial and error. I'm one of those who has never read a tutor or listened to advice from other players. Haven't the patience. I searched for chords and harmony from the very first day that I laid hands on my Anglo and in the process was very soon having fun finding a wealth of chords and harmony for myself. Once discovered never forgotten ! Stick with it. Provided that the tunes and harmony are in your head and the music appropriate for the instrument your fingers will eventually get the message and you can then relax and concentrate on all the other aspects of the music.

Rod

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