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Gold Stamping for Jeffries and Jeffries Bros.


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I wanted anyone in need of replacement bellows and end run stamping to know that I have Jeffries, Jeffries Bros., Lachenal and Jones stamps. 6 and 7 fold bellows available. The folds are deep, within 1/16 of an inch of Jeffries specs.

 

Greg

 

 

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I wanted anyone in need of replacement bellows and end run stamping to know that I have Jeffries, Jeffries Bros., Lachenal and Jones stamps. 6 and 7 fold bellows available. The folds are deep, within 1/16 of an inch of Jeffries specs.

 

Greg

 

 

Greg I am an accordion reed Anglo builder in Texas. I am very interested in where you got the gold stamp dies for the bellows end leathers. Can you give me a hint as to where to get them and something about cost.

My direct email is anglo@concertinas.com . My phone number is 214-703-0409, and I am here most of the time.

Harold Herrington

Rowlett, TX 75089

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I wanted anyone in need of replacement bellows and end run stamping to know that I have Jeffries, Jeffries Bros., Lachenal and Jones stamps. 6 and 7 fold bellows available. The folds are deep, within 1/16 of an inch of Jeffries specs.

 

Greg

 

 

 

Hi Greg,

 

The photographs look fine, but can you clarify, the original blocking was as much an embossing, or impressing process as a gold 'printing' process. How deep are yours pressed into the leather?

 

Dave

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I wanted anyone in need of replacement bellows and end run stamping to know that I have Jeffries, Jeffries Bros., Lachenal and Jones stamps. 6 and 7 fold bellows available. The folds are deep, within 1/16 of an inch of Jeffries specs.

 

Greg

 

 

 

Hi Greg,

 

The photographs look fine, but can you clarify, the original blocking was as much an embossing, or impressing process as a gold 'printing' process. How deep are yours pressed into the leather?

 

Dave

 

Hi Dave,

Embossed but so far not as deeply as original Jeffries. Still working on that aspect with the bookbinders who do the stamping for me on their Kensol machine. The Jeffries Bros. duet was an end run recover and did not get an embossed stamping.

 

Greg

Edited by Greg Jowaisas
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I wanted anyone in need of replacement bellows and end run stamping to know that I have Jeffries, Jeffries Bros., Lachenal and Jones stamps. 6 and 7 fold bellows available. The folds are deep, within 1/16 of an inch of Jeffries specs.

 

Greg

 

 

 

Hi Greg,

 

The photographs look fine, but can you clarify, the original blocking was as much an embossing, or impressing process as a gold 'printing' process. How deep are yours pressed into the leather?

 

Dave

 

Hi Dave,

Embossed but so far not as deeply as original Jeffries. Still working on that aspect with the bookbinders who do the stamping for me on their Kensol machine.

 

Greg

 

 

Greg, not an easy one, but if you are getting the gold below the surface so it does not rub off, then you are well in front of some of the competition.

 

Dave

 

 

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I wanted anyone in need of replacement bellows and end run stamping to know that I have Jeffries, Jeffries Bros., Lachenal and Jones stamps. 6 and 7 fold bellows available. The folds are deep, within 1/16 of an inch of Jeffries specs.

 

Greg

 

 

Greg I am an accordion reed Anglo builder in Texas. I am very interested in where you got the gold stamp dies for the bellows end leathers. Can you give me a hint as to where to get them and something about cost.

My direct email is anglo@concertinas.com . My phone number is 214-703-0409, and I am here most of the time.

Harold Herrington

Rowlett, TX 75089

 

I had a nice talk with Harold who has been making very nice concertinas for over 15 years.

 

Greg

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Wouldn't you just love to be a mouse in the corner of a room with Dave Elliot, Harold Herrinton, and Greg Jowaisas?? Now that would be an interesting evening! Makes me shiver just thinking about it. delicious. Michelle SE WI USA

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I'm surprised Greg and Harold don't already know each other. Maybe I spend too much time reading forums and they don't?

 

At the North East Squeeze-In you can hear conversations like that!

 

Ken

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Hi Dave,

Embossed but so far not as deeply as original Jeffries. Still working on that aspect with the bookbinders who do the stamping for me on their Kensol machine. The Jeffries Bros. duet was an end run recover and did not get an embossed stamping.

 

Greg

Hi, Greg,

 

Do you think the embossing could be made on an already made 'tina? It's because Suttner puts bellows papers on his instruments, but no gold embossing, And I was thinking about to talk to some bookbinders I know here, in Madrid. Thanks!

 

Fer

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Hi Dave,

Embossed but so far not as deeply as original Jeffries. Still working on that aspect with the bookbinders who do the stamping for me on their Kensol machine. The Jeffries Bros. duet was an end run recover and did not get an embossed stamping.

 

Greg

Hi, Greg,

 

Do you think the embossing could be made on an already made 'tina? It's because Suttner puts bellows papers on his instruments, but no gold embossing, And I was thinking about to talk to some bookbinders I know here, in Madrid. Thanks!

 

Fer

 

 

Fer,

The Jeffries Bros. duet stamping was a recover of existing end runs. The thin leather to accomplish a rebind will take a gold stamping but not offer much of an embossment to protect the stamp as Dave Elliot has pointed out. In the case of this stamping a protective spray was applied (from Tandy Leather)

 

A local bindery familiar with gold stamp embossing can provide much information.

 

Greg

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I want to do a friendly reminder and caution folks that before they attempt any modification on an instrument, especially a nice expensive instrument, to please make an honest evaluation of your skills and tools.

 

While much of concertina repair and maintenance is not brain surgery there are aspects that are best left to repair people and makers and specialists that have PRACTICED hundreds and in some cases thousands of times. In many cases they use or have developed special tools that help them to accomplish the work we all admire.

 

I'm a firm believer in concertina players being able to do basic maintenance on their instruments such as competently opening up their instruments, clearing reed tongues, changing a spring or replacing a bad valve. Other, more complicated adjustments, are within the range of some but beyond the range of others.

 

So know your limits. Be prepared to practice before attempting. And always keep the instrument's best interest at heart.

 

As RP3 reminded me just the other day, "We are not so much owners as caretakers of our concertinas for the next generations."

 

Greg

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Wouldn't you just love to be a mouse in the corner of a room with Dave Elliot, Harold Herrinton, and Greg Jowaisas?? Now that would be an interesting evening! Makes me shiver just thinking about it. delicious. Michelle SE WI USA

 

as a mouse, you would want cheese, we would have to deal with the beer...........

 

Dave

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I want to do a friendly reminder and caution folks that before they attempt any modification on an instrument, especially a nice expensive instrument, to please make an honest evaluation of your skills and tools.

 

While much of concertina repair and maintenance is not brain surgery there are aspects that are best left to repair people and makers and specialists that have PRACTICED hundreds and in some cases thousands of times. In many cases they use or have developed special tools that help them to accomplish the work we all admire.

 

I'm a firm believer in concertina players being able to do basic maintenance on their instruments such as competently opening up their instruments, clearing reed tongues, changing a spring or replacing a bad valve. Other, more complicated adjustments, are within the range of some but beyond the range of others.

 

So know your limits. Be prepared to practice before attempting. And always keep the instrument's best interest at heart.

 

As RP3 reminded me just the other day, "We are not so much owners as caretakers of our concertinas for the next generations."

 

Greg

 

 

 

Well said Greg,

 

It might be interesting to compare notes on well meant repairs that have caused us headaches, or drastically upped the cost, or viability of a repair,

 

typically:

  • epoxy gluing of valves;
  • tuning by grinding across reeds,
  • adhesive tape on bellows, and resultant residue
  • curing moth attack by spraying wood worm killer onto the reed pan.
  • varnishing reed pans

Is this worth a thread 'How not to kill your concertina', subtitle :' the road to hell is paved with good intentions'

 

What does the team think, it might just warn someone off a 'good idea'?

 

Dave

 

 

 

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I want to do a friendly reminder and caution folks that before they attempt any modification on an instrument, especially a nice expensive instrument, to please make an honest evaluation of your skills and tools.

 

While much of concertina repair and maintenance is not brain surgery there are aspects that are best left to repair people and makers and specialists that have PRACTICED hundreds and in some cases thousands of times. In many cases they use or have developed special tools that help them to accomplish the work we all admire.

 

I'm a firm believer in concertina players being able to do basic maintenance on their instruments such as competently opening up their instruments, clearing reed tongues, changing a spring or replacing a bad valve. Other, more complicated adjustments, are within the range of some but beyond the range of others.

 

So know your limits. Be prepared to practice before attempting. And always keep the instrument's best interest at heart.

 

As RP3 reminded me just the other day, "We are not so much owners as caretakers of our concertinas for the next generations."

 

Greg

 

 

 

Well said Greg,

 

It might be interesting to compare notes on well meant repairs that have caused us headaches, or drastically upped the cost, or viability of a repair,

 

typically:

  • epoxy gluing of valves;
  • tuning by grinding across reeds,
  • adhesive tape on bellows, and resultant residue
  • curing moth attack by spraying wood worm killer onto the reed pan.
  • varnishing reed pans
  • etc etc etc

Is this worth a thread 'How not to kill your concertina', subtitle :' the road to hell is paved with good intentions'

 

What does the team think, it might just warn someone off a 'good idea'?

 

Dave

 

 

 

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was embossing carried out originally on the binding unfitted, or onto the fitted binding by pressing against the bellows frame?

 

This is the key question in looking at deeper embossing on end wraps

 

Dave

 

 

 

Edited by d.elliott
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It might be interesting to compare notes on well meant repairs that have caused us headaches, or drastically upped the cost, or viability of a repair,

 

typically:

  • epoxy gluing of valves;
  • tuning by grinding across reeds,
  • adhesive tape on bellows, and resultant residue
  • curing moth attack by spraying wood worm killer onto the reed pan.
  • varnishing reed pans
  • etc etc etc

 

And I would add to that tightening the end bolts so hard in an attempt cure an air leak that the bolts end up drilling almost though to the bellows frame (I have one just like that in the pile for restoration :( ). It also exhibits the tape on the bellows headache and lateral scratching on the reeds.

Edited by SteveS
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was embossing carried out originally on the binding unfitted, or onto the fitted binding by pressing against the bellows frame?

 

This is the key question in looking at deeper embossing on end wraps

 

Dave

 

It can be done either way though it is much easier accomplished if the embossing/stamping is done before the leather is attached to the frames. On an instrument such as a Jeffries where you have lines that go all the way around the bellows, you almost have to do the embossing/stamping first. If you look closely at a Jeffries bellows near the corners, you can sometimes see in the lines where the pattern breaks and begins again.

 

The Suttner (discussed above) might be able to be stamped though it would be a difficult job (unless new end runs were made up with the stamping done first). Also, it should be noted that not all leathers take stamping well, and if there was a finish applied to the bellows, this also might present problems. I'm not certain but I seem to recall that Bob Tedrow might have mentioned somewhere that he does his stamping after the leather is attached to the frames. If this is true, and if you want to keep the original leather I would have him do the job for you rather than a local bookbinder. Otherwise, have Greg make up new endruns and attach them for you.

 

Wally

Edited by Wally Carroll
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